Here & Now

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Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Who Is In Your Thoughts On Memorial Day?

Let us know who you are remembering on our Facebook page or in the comments.

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Washington Concertgoers Fill Nearby Hospital

The Gorge Amphitheater, a week before Sasquatch. When 25,000 people pack the Gorge, its population exceeds every other town in Grant County. (Jessica Robinson/Northwest News Network)

This weekend, rock and indie music fans from across the country make their annual pilgrimage to a corner of the Northwest’s farm country, for the annual Sasquatch Music Festival.

Over three days, 25,000 rollicking concertgoers turn the picturesque Gorge Amphitheater along the Columbia River in central Washington into the largest city in the county.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Clive Owen Gets Wordy In New Romantic Comedy

British actor Clive Owen, who stars in "Words and Pictures," is pictured here on May 20, 2013 in Cannes, France. (Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

British actor Clive Owen is known for his roles in thrillers such as “Killer Elite,” the dystopian “Children of Men” and Spike Lee’s heist drama “Inside Man.” But for his latest film, he goes into academia.

In “Words and Pictures,” Owen plays a poet turned prep school English teacher. His job is in jeopardy: he drinks too much and his teaching has become lackluster.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

California Counties Sue 5 Narcotics Makers

The prescription medicine OxyContin is displayed in 2001 at a Walgreens drugstore in Brookline, Mass. (Darren McCollester/Getty Images)

Two counties in California — Orange and Santa Clara — are suing five major drug companies, accusing them of causing the growing prescription drug epidemic across the country.

The complaint, filed on behalf of the state of California, accuses the companies, which make painkilling drugs such as Oxy­Con­tin, of deceptive marketing. The lawsuit seeks financial damages.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Americans Are Working Less, So Why Are We So Stressed Out?

Americans are working less hours overall, but among the white-collar crowd, time spent working is at a high, while leisure is at a low. (Phil Whitehouse/Flickr)

The amount of hours worked in the U.S. is considerably less than it used to be. And we’re not alone — every other advanced economy around the world is working less, too. But single parents are working more, as are the highly educated and wealthy.

Derek Thompson of The Atlantic joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss some of the reasons why it seems like we all have less leisure time.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Natasha Trethewey Ends Her Tenure As U.S. Poet Laureate

As her tenure as U.S. Poet Laureate comes to an end, Natasha Trethewey reflects on her work and poetry in our country today. (W.T. Pfefferle/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 2:13 pm

The role of the United States Poet Laureate is to raise the country’s consciousness about poetry and to spark passion for the craft.

At the conclusion of her two-year tenure as the 19th U.S. Poet Laureate, Pulitzer Prize winner Natasha Trethewey has done that and more.

As her term comes to an end, she joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to reflect on her work, her unique past and the state of poetry today.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Pennsylvania Becomes Latest Gay Marriage State

Peg Welch, center left, and her wife Delma Welch gather with others at a gay marriage rally on the steps of the state Capitol Tuesday, May 20, 2014, in Harrisburg, Pa. Pennsylvania's ban on gay marriage was overturned Tuesday by a federal judge in a decision that makes same-sex marriage legal throughout the Northeast. (Matt Rourke/AP)

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 2:28 pm

Pennsylvania’s Republican Governor Tom Corbett says he won’t appeal yesterday’s ruling from a federal judge striking down a state law that banned gay marriage.

Hundreds of gay couples are rushing to get married in the state, which as of today has become the 19th state where gay marriage is legal.

On Monday, a federal judge in Oregon struck down a voter-approved ban on gay marriage and a federal judge in Utah ordered state officials to recognize more than 1,000 gay marriages performed there in the two weeks before the U.S. Supreme Court issued an emergency stay.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Fare-Dodging Movement Strengthens In Sweden

A fare dodger is pictured in this 2011 photo on Planka.nu's Flickr. (Planka.nu/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 2:13 pm

They’re the nemesis of public transportation agencies across the world: fare dodgers. But a growing number say they’re not bandits, rather participants in an important social movement.

Case in point: a group in Stockholm, Sweden, that wants fares to be abolished altogether and transport to be 100 percent tax-funded (it’s currently 50 percent tax-funded).

Alex Berthelsen is a longtime member of that organization, called Planka.nu (roughly translated to “Free-Ride.Now”).

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Catching Up With Michelle Chamuel Of 'The Voice'

Michelle Chamuel is pictured in the cover photo for her single "Go Down Singing." (Courtesy)

Tonight is the season finale of NBC’s hit singing competition, “The Voice.” That means it’s been about a year since Michelle Chamuel came in second, after her breakout run on the fourth season of the show.

Chamuel was a huge fan favorite, with her big black-framed glasses that inspired the hashtag #foureyesontheprize.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

NIH: Scientists Must Include Female Animals In Testing

The National Institutes of Health will soon begin requiring scientists to test new drugs on both male and female animals. Researchers now tend to use mostly male animals in pre-clinical tests, even for drugs that will also be used by women.

But that has had some major consequences for women.

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