Here & Now

Weekdays at Noon

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
12:46 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Spain's Population Declines Amid Economic Crisis

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 10:50 am

The economic crisis in Spain, where the unemployment rate is a record 27 percent, is forcing people to leave the country to look for work.

The BBC’s Tom Burridge reports the birthrate in Spain is also falling, because couples believe they can’t afford to have children under the economic circumstances.

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The Salt
11:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Do Diet Drinks Mess Up Metabolisms?

Some researchers think that artificial sweeteners, most frequently consumed in diet drinks, may confuse the body.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 4:10 pm

It may seem counterintuitive, but there's a body of evidence to suggest that the millions of Americans with a diet soda habit may not be doing their waistlines — or their blood sugar — any favors.

As the consumption of diet drinks made with artificial sweeteners continues to rise, researchers are beginning to make some uncomfortable associations with weight gain and other diseases.

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NPR Story
2:21 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Advice Columnist Margo Howard Retires

Margo Howard is retiring from the advice business, and now working on a book about her life.

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:17 am

Margo Howard is the only child of the beloved advice columnist Ann Landers. Her mother’s twin sister, Pauline Phillips, was Dear Abby.

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NPR Story
2:21 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

The Tricky Business Of Farming — CSA Style

Michael Baute farms three acres in Fort Collins, Colo. One-third of Spring Kite Farms goes to the farm’s CSA, or Community Supported Agriculture, clients. (Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media)

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 2:46 pm

Within the local food movement, the community-supported agriculture (CSA) model is highly valued. You buy a share of a farmer’s produce up-front as a shareholder, then if all goes well, you reap the rewards at harvest time.

But running a CSA can bring with it some tricky business decisions.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Harvest Public Media’s Luke Runyon reports.

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NPR Story
2:21 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Barnes & Noble CEO Resigns

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 2:46 pm

Barnes & Noble CEO William Lynch Jr. has resigned. The company has faced poor earnings reports and recently announced that it would stop manufacturing its own e-reader, the Nook.

What do these changes mean for Barnes & Noble, and booksellers?

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NPR Story
12:54 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Kentucky Senate Race Will Be One Of 2014's Most Watched

U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell, left, and his challenger, Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 2:46 pm

Republican Mitch McConnell first won election to the Senate nearly 30 years ago, in 1984. This year he faces a Democrat who was born just a few years before McConnell took office, 34-year-old Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

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NPR Story
12:54 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Cory Doctorow To Young Readers: Hold Government Accountable

Art by Yuko Shimizu on the cover of Cory Doctorow's "Homeland." (Tor Books)

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 3:15 pm

In the best selling books “Little Brother” and “Homeland,” Cory Doctorow uses his hero, teenage hacktivist Marcus Yallow, to get young people to think about privacy, civil liberties and the duties of the citizen in the age of the Internet.

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NPR Story
12:54 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Citizen Journalist Killed In Syria

Syrian citizen journalist Fidaa al-Baali is pictured with his camera and a group of children. (Activists News Association/Facebook)

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 2:46 pm

Fidaa al-Baali was a trusted source for international journalists.  He used his video camera to document the Syrian war and anti-government protests. Baali died last Friday.

We talk about his contributions, and have an update of the continuing upheaval in his country.


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NPR Story
2:16 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Andy Murray Ends Britain's 77-Year Wimbledon Wait

Andy Murray of Britain poses with the trophy after defeating Novak Djokovic of Serbia during the Men's singles final match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships in Wimbledon, London, Sunday, July 7, 2013. (Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:27 pm

After 77 years, a British man finally won Wimbledon. Andy Murray beat Novak Djokovic in three straight sets.

When it was over, Murray acted as if he couldn’t quite believe it, and most of Britain felt the same way.

Michael Goldfarb is a longtime public radio journalist who has been living in Britain for a third of that 77-year wait. Over the years, Goldfarb has vowed that he will leave Britain if a Brit ever won Wimbledon.

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NPR Story
2:16 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Pokey LaFarge's Love Song To The Midwest

Musician and songwriter Pokey LaFarge is based in St. Louis, Missouri. (Joshua Black Wilkins)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:50 pm

Stephen Thompson, writer and editor for NPR Music, brings us a new song each week.

This week he introduces us to the music of musician and songwriter Pokey LaFarge, with his new song “Central Time” from his self titled album.

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