Here & Now

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Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
2:28 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

Plan To Save Astrodome Tops $240 Million

The Urban Land Institute's report outlines a $243 million plan to renovate the Houston Astrodome. (BarkingCat5000/Flickr)

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 3:33 pm

A report out this week outlines a $240 million plan to renovate and save the iconic Houston Astrodome. When it first opened in 1965, some people called it the Eighth Wonder of the World.

But time caught up to the world’s first domed stadium. In 1999, the Houston Astros found a new home, the stadium fell into disrepair, and Harris County has been looking for a way to save it now for years.

Voters rejected a bond initiative in 2013, but the latest plan calls for a mix of public and private funding.

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NPR Story
2:28 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

Using Poetry To Expose The Power Of Money, Class And Gender

Alissa Quart is an author, a journalist and most recently, a poet. (alissaquart.com)

Alissa Quart is a journalist, a keen observer of our culture and a believer in the power of poetry to cut to the heart of issues around us: money, class, gender and the environment.

She has just released her first book of poetry that is both personal and universal – inspired by work and research she has done as a journalist.

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NPR Story
2:28 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

Oil Prices Jump After Saudi Strikes In Yemen

People search for survivors under the rubble of houses destroyed by Saudi airstrikes near Sanaa Airport, Yemen, Thursday, March 26, 2015. (Hani Mohammed/AP)

The price of Brent crude jumped 5 percent yesterday as Saudi Arabia began airstrikes in Yemen. It was the biggest spike in oil prices since February. The benchmark settled near $60 a barrel.

Saudi involvement in Yemen’s growing unrest has led to fears of instability in the oil market, even though a global supply glut was a primary reason why oil prices have been so low.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

WWII Veterans Return 'Good Luck Flags' To Japanese

Obon 2015 co-founder Rex Ziak at Monday's Returning Ceremony in Astoria, Oregon. (Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)

The 70th anniversary of the end of WWII will be marked later this year. In the meantime, some veterans of that war are embarking on one more mission.

In some cases, wives or children are taking on the mission if the veteran has passed away. The object is to return Japanese flags taken as war souvenirs from Pacific battlefields.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Tom Banse reports from Astoria, Oregon on an emotional gesture of peace and reconciliation.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Noah Baumbach On Middle Age And 'While We're Young'

Naomi Watts and Ben Stiller star in "While We're Young."

In writer-director Noah Baumbach‘s new film “While We’re Young,” Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts play a documentary filmmaker and his wife who live a reasonably content life in New York City. They befriend a younger couple whose free-spirited ways first energize them and then cause them to question themselves and their marriage.

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Thu March 26, 2015

Trying To De-Radicalize French Prisons

French prisons have come under the spotlight in the past two months, as a key recruiting ground for Islamist extremists. January’s attacks in Paris by brothers Cherif and Said Kouachi and Ahmedy Coulibaly, in which 17 people were killed, led to fresh questions about the links they made in prison.

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NPR Story
1:06 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

A Crisis In Slow Motion: California Enters Fourth Year Of Drought

Low water levels are visible at Lake McClure on March 24, 2015, in La Grange, California. More than 3,000 residents in the Sierra Nevada foothill community of Lake Don Pedro who rely on water from Lake McCLure could potentially run out of water in the near future if the severe drought continues. Lake McClure is currently at 7 percent of its normal capacity and residents are under mandatory 50 percent water use restrictions. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Today the California State Senate will take up an emergency $1.1 billion water management bill. That legislation has the support of the governor and the leaders of both political parties, and is expected to pass easily.

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NPR Story
1:06 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Giving Up The Concert Stage To Teach

Piano instructor Seymour Bernstein, left, poses with actor Ethan Hawke. Hawke made a documentary about Bernstein called "Seymour: An Introduction," which has won raves on the festival circuit. (Robin Holland/IFC Films via AP)

Seymour Bernstein fell in love with the piano at an early age and built a stellar concert career. But when he was 50, Seymour decided to give it up to devote his time to writing and teaching.

Now 88, Seymour Bernstein is the focus of the documentary “Seymour: An Introduction,” directed by actor Ethan Hawke. Here & Now’s Robin Young talks to Bernstein about his life and the film.

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NPR Story
1:06 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

U.S. Universities Accept Record Number of Foreign Students

International students are pictured at Purdue University, which ranks second in the U.S. for its population of foreign students. (purdue.edu)

A new report released today by the Department of Homeland Security, says the number of international students being accepted by American universities is at an all-time high of 1.13 million. The number accepted is up 14 percent from last year, and nearly 50 percent from 2010.

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NPR Story
2:39 pm
Tue March 24, 2015

James Corden Is The New Face of 'The Late Late Show'

Actor/host James Corden puts up his own billboard for CBS Television Network's "The Late Late Show" on March 6, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. (Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 5:01 pm

James Corden is the new face of CBS's “The Late Late Show.”

Corden is virtually unknown in the U.S., aside from those of who know him as the baker in Disney's screen adaptation of "Into The Woods."

NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans stayed up late, late last night to watch Corden's first show and now shares his impressions with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

[Youtube]

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