Here & Now

Weekdays at Noon

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Ten years ago this week New Orleans was under water. A decade later, people who survived the flood are still turning to art to make sense of Hurricane Katrina’s fury.

Several of the city’s major museums have acknowledged the anniversary with new exhibits, including one at the New Orleans Museum of Art.

A new program that allows allows real estate companies to buy a share of public housing buildings is causing controversy in Baltimore.

Some say the Rental Assistance Demonstration program frees up needed funding for affordable housing programs, but others worry that the program shows a cutback on government commitment to public housing and leans too heavily on the private sector.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Jonna McKone of WYPR in Baltimore explains the story of public housing’s future and past.

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady can suit up for his team’s season opener after a judge erased his four-game suspension for “Deflategate.”

The surprise ruling by U.S. District Judge Richard Berman came Thursday after more than one month of failed settlement talks between the NFL and its players’ union. Many legal experts believed the judge was merely pressuring the sides to settle when he criticized the NFL’s handling of the case at two hearings in August.

But the judge wasn’t posturing.

Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst enjoys yogurt as a breakfast dish with granola and fruit. She also likes it as a dessert, perhaps drizzled with maple syrup, coconut and more fruit. But as she tells host Robin Young, yogurt also has endless savory possibilities.

President Barack Obama made history this week by becoming the first U.S. president to cross the invisible line into the Arctic Circle while in office. He used the trip to draw attention to global warming trends that are melting ice in the Arctic Ocean.

Scientists predict the body of water will be ice-free for much of the summer, as early as 2030. That calls into question who has access to what in an increasingly accessible part of the world.

How much are you working when you’re at work? That’s the question increasingly on the minds of employers, especially ones in Silicon Valley.

The New York Times exposé on Amazon painted a portrait – one that Amazon refutes – of a harsh workplace where employees are measured by algorithms and anonymous peer reviews.

New Zealand is holding a public competition to possibly replace the country’s current flag. Over 10,000 designs were submitted and yesterday, four designs were revealed as finalists.

New Zealand residents will vote on a winner later this year and then in March 2016, they will vote on whether that winner will replace the current New Zealand flag.

When Hurricane Katrina burst through the levees in New Orleans 10 years ago, floodwaters instantly rendered thousands of homes uninhabitable.

At the peak of the housing crisis that followed, nearly 12,000 New Orleans residents were homeless. They lived on the streets and in ruined buildings.

Abbott Roland was one of them. After the storm, he was rescued by helicopter from his porch, slept in the Superdome with other flood victims and then moved for a time to Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Lawyers representing thousands of inmates who have been held in small, windowless rooms say they’ve reached a settlement with the state of California to end the practice of extreme long-term isolation. Michael Montgomery talks with Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins about the history of solitary confinement in California and what is going to change.

Pages