Coastal Desk

Southeast Louisiana is sinking under the waves faster than any coastal landscape in the world. With so much at stake for Louisiana and the nation, WWNO has made coastal news a priority.

Since mid-2014 our Coastal Desk reporting team has been producing frequent news reports and in-depth features covering coastal erosion and restoration; hurricane protection; offshore energy and other coastal businesses; wildlife and fisheries impacts; and coastal communities and culture.

Support for the Coastal Desk comes from the Walton Family Foundation, the Greater New Orleans Foundation, and local listeners.

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John McCusker / The Advocate

A decision Wednesday by the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East (SLFPA-East) means the embattled Sewerage and Water Board (SWB) won’t operate three key pieces of the hurricane protection system around New Orleans.

LA SAFE

Louisiana’s Coastal Master plan focuses on restoring and protecting the coast: Building levees, marshes and land. But even with those investments, the state still expects to deal with flooding in the future. Many communities are still going to have to figure out how adapt for the long term.

Ted Jackson / NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

For this week's coastal news roundup WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with Nola.com/The Times-Picayune coastal reporter Tristan Baurick about new flood control management, illegal oystering, and a marsh grass die-off in the Mississippi Delta. 

Sara Sneath / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

On this week's coastal news roundup, WWNO's Tegan Wendland talked with Nola.com | The Times-Picayune's coastal reporter Sara Sneath about how land loss is affecting a native duck species, prioritizing coastal restoration projects and new funding to rebuild a barrier island.

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com|The Times-Picayune

Every Friday, coastal reporters from WWNO and Nola.com | The Times-Picayune come together to talk about the week in coastal news.

This week: a platform fire in the Gulf, concern around Sewerage and Water Board contracts and an effort to rebuild the coast from the sky.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The New Orleans City Council questioned the leadership of the Sewerage and Water Board Tuesday about their plan for hiring more employees.

 

Some residents and council members worry the utility is on the path toward privatization.

U.S. Supreme Court

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: legal stuff!

A local levee board's lawsuit against more than 90 oil and gas companies ends after bouncing around in the courts for several years. Plus, the EPA, the federal Department of Justice, and the State of Louisiana reach a settlement with Exxon Mobil, after claiming Exxon's facilities violated the Clean Air Act.

Jim Bowen / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Exxon Mobil will settle air pollution cases with the federal government and the State of Louisiana.

 

The feds and the state of Louisiana claimed that Exxon Mobil violated the Clean Air Act by releasing excess amounts of harmful pollutants from eight of its chemical plants.

 

Five of those plants are in Texas. Three of them are in the Baton Rouge area.  All of them make either plastic, or chemicals for plastic — according to EPA officials.

Dr. Terry McTigue / NOAA

Four years ago, the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority - East (SLFPA-E) filed a lawsuit against dozens of oil and gas companies, claiming they damaged the coast and made levee protection more difficult.

 

The board had asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a previous court's decision, but now the Supreme Court says it won’t — effectively killing the lawsuit.

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