All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city. Hosted by Jack Hopke.

French 75

On Saturday New Orleanians will mark ten years since Hurricane Katrina in a variety of ways.

Chris Hannah is the head bartender at Arnaud’s French 75 in the French Quarter. He’s been behind the bar there all of his 11 years in the city.

Every August 29th Hannah says he makes sure he reunites with roommates and friends from 2005, for dinner and reflection.

Hannah spoke with WWNO's Jesse Hardman about his Katrina anniversary routine.

Cypress trees in Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge, stretching across Cameron and Evangeline Parishes in southwestern Louisiana.
Steve Hillebrand / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Hurricane Rita came ashore just three weeks after Hurricane Katrina, killing seven people directly and over a hundred more in the evacuation and in the storm's aftermath.

Ten years later, many residents of southwest Louisiana are feeling forgotten as the international media spotlight stays focused on New Orleans.

WWNO 89.9 FM

A lot changes in 10 years. Here at WWNO, we’ve witnessed many transformations since the summer of 2005: we’ve expanded our format, started a local news department, and even won some awards.

None of that would have been possible without the memorable efforts of WWNO’s staff who kept the radio station running after Hurricane Katrina and the floods that followed.

This is the long story of a short street: Schnell Drive, two blocks of brick homes in Arabi, La., just east of New Orleans in St. Bernard Parish.

When we first visited in the fall of 2005, Donald and Colleen Bordelon were often the only two people on Schnell Drive. They had stayed in their home through the storm and the flood, and through the weeks after when the first floor was still filled with water.

A decade after Hurricane Katrina — the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history — President Obama told a crowd in New Orleans that the storm was a "man-made" calamity that had as much to do with economic inequality and the failure of government as it did the forces of nature.

"What started out as a natural disaster became a man-made disaster — a failure of government to look out for its own citizens," the president said in a speech at a newly opened community center in the Lower Ninth Ward, a predominantly black neighborhood that was devastated by Katrina.

Terri Coleman, Gentilly resident and teacher at Dillard University
Rush Jagoe

You might have noticed a few cameras around town this week. Yes, the entire media world has descended on New Orleans.


But some reporters began digging around the city much earlier in the summer, in hopes of providing more in depth coverage. Anna Sale is the host of a year-old podcast from WNYC, the public radio station in New York City, called Death Sex & Money. Each episode focuses on one person, and gives them the chance to explore and dissect moments from their lives.

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans today is smaller than when the storm hit, with 110,000 fewer people than the nearly half-million who had lived there. But the city's recovery is a story that varies with each neighborhood. In some neighborhoods, like the Lower Ninth Ward, many residents never returned. Others, like the French Quarter, have seen many newcomers and now have more households than they did in 2005.

St. Bernard Fire Department via The Historic New Orleans Collection

This month, as part of WWNO's ongoing Katrina 10 coverage, we bring you The Katrina Files: Reflections from First Responders. This series is based on oral histories conducted by The Historic New Orleans Collection and hosted by Paul Maassen.

Thomas Walsh

The Monumental Task Committee, a volunteer organization that looks after New Orleans monuments, is hosting a public forum on Tuesday, August 25, 2015. The goal is to discuss the fate of four Confederate-themed statues.

The debate on whether New Orleans should continue hosting depictions of General Robert E. Lee and other Civil War Confederate heroes started in June, after the racially charged shooting of eight black parishioners at a church in Charleston, South Carolina. That state decided to stop flying the Confederate flag at the state capital. And soon after Mayor Landrieu opened a dialogue on his city’s use of Confederate symbols, namely a series of statues.

After the levees broke 10 years ago in New Orleans, tens of thousands of residents fled the city and never returned. They resettled in 32 states around the nation, many of them landing in Houston.

New Home Family Worship Center also relocated to that city and became the spiritual family for a dislocated and homesick congregation. Most of the people who came to a special worship service Thursday night were born in New Orleans. With "Katrina 10" projected on the screen behind the altar, Pastor Robert C. Blakes introduced his special guest.