All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city.

The Desegregation Of McDonogh 19: An Oral History

Nov 16, 2017
The Historic New Orleans Collection

 

School desegregation was a major turning point of the civil rights movement, especially here in New Orleans. In this edition of NOLA Life Stories, we meet Tessie Prevost-Williams. She was one of The McDonogh Three, the young African-American girls who integrated their elementary school in the 9th Ward in 1960. Tessie describes her memory of that first morning on the way to school. 

Julie Jordan Scott / Flickr

New Orleans has claimed several literary figures as its own -- Tennessee Williams is just the tip of the iceberg. The 19th century writer Kate Chopin was most known for her novel, "The Awakening," and Professor Barbara Ewell is an expert on the author. She joins Brian Friedman in the studio to talk about Kate Chopin's relevance in 2017. 

Visit ViaNolaVie for a related article written by Brian Friedman.  

On this week's edition of All Things New Orleans, we'll chat with Miriam Arkin and Casey Coleman, of Court 13 Arts, about their upcoming Always for Pleasure Festival.  Then, Jessica Rosgaard returns with Richard Campanella to discuss his CityScapes column for nola.com/The Times Picayune. 

And, the Green Project's Catherine Crowell talks "all things reuseable" as we approach America Recycles Day on November 15th. 

Tom W. Sulcer

 

The Therapeutic Day Program provides space and services for kids with severe mental and behavioral health needs in New Orleans. Former WWNO reporter Mallory Falk checked in with the school back in 2015, and today NolaVie's Kelley Crawford welcomes back Elizabeth Marcell and Monica Stevens to discuss what changes and developments have come to the school since then.

Patrick Melon / Melon the Scribe

On this edition of All Things New Orleans, we discuss the Orleans Public Defenders' 2nd Annual Second Line for Equal Justice. Then, we'll share another episode of the Listening Post. 

And our very own Jess Clark sits down with New Orleans rapper and singer, Pell. 

When the Saints are playing, New Orleans is eating.
Ian McNulty

For players and coaches, a football game starts long before kickoff. The same holds true for the food-minded Saints fan. For such fans, it starts with choosing what to cook and devoting the hands-on work to ensure a victorious feast.

It's really no wonder. Take the enthusiasm of the Who Dat Nation, add south Louisiana's endemic passion for food and the results are predictably over the top.

Infrogmation of New Orleans / Flickr

New Orleans has a great new tool for music lovers. A Closer Walk is an interactive, location-based website about New Orleans music history. Just tap the map and you can find songs, rare photos, stories by local writers, and much more. One of the project’s founders, author Randy Fertel, speaks with NolaVie’s Renée Peck to share more about A Closer Walk.

Visit ViaNolaVie for a related article written by Renée Peck.

On this week's edition of All Things New Orleans we'll talk about TedWomen and their upcoming conference with  founder and curator, Pat Mitchell. Then Jessica Rosgaard digs into Chef John Besh's sexual harassment scandal with nola.com/The Times Picayune reporter, Brett Anderson. 

Then we'll share another story from Bring Your Own; a live story-telling series. 

House of Shock

This Halloween marks the 25th anniversary of the House of Shock. The haunted attraction has made its mark on the city through hair-raising costumes, theatrical sound, and pyrotechnics. NolaVie’s David Benedetto catches up with one of the founders, Ross Karpelman, as he prepares to get into character for the last weekend before Halloween.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by David Benedetto.  

Drew Varick

In this edition of Notes from New Orleans, Brian Friedman meets a professional bodybuilder with a surprising backstory. Drew Varick is an actor and stuntman who got into bodybuilding after taking a role as a sideshow performer. Standing 3 feet 6 inches tall, he’s also among the smallest bodybuilders ever.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Brian Friedman.

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