All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city. Hosted by Jack Hopke.

Jdarn010

NCIS: New Orleans is one of television’s most popular weekly shows. On this week’s Notes from New Orleans, NolaVie’s Sharon Litwin talks with crew member Albert Quaid about what makes the show so authentic.

Jeff Horchoff points out bee boxes
Ryan Kailath / WWNO

Recovery efforts are in full swing on the Northshore, where some areas received record flooding. At Saint Joseph Abbey -- a seminary college just north of Covington -- the campus, which last flooded in 1926, received between 20 and 24 inches of flooding.

 


Historic New Orleans City

It’s estimated that local non-profits have annual expenditures of over $550 million and must rely on government subsidies, fundraising campaigns and grant proposals to complete their missions. Philanthropic groups, like the Joe W. and Dorothy Dorsett Brown Foundation, develop their own mission statements to support those institutions and spend the year deciding where to allocate funds.

Erik Frank won the Blackstone Big Idea award at New Orleans Entrepreneur Week in 2013.
Erik Frank

Erik Frank had been in business for a year when he went to New Orleans’ Entrepreneur Week and got caught up in its fervor. Thousands wanted to see “the next big thing,” and Erik made himself a promise that his idea -- nutritional meals delivered to your job -- would be it. A year later, he pitched before celebrity judges and won $50,000 for his business, Your Nutrition Delivered.

myvanishinghometowns.com

Christy George is concerned that too many Americans are in denial about climate change and is trying a find a new approach to change their minds. She believes that people join social movements once they’re convinced it’s the right thing to do, so she’s collecting personal stories from locals who have been impacted by rising tides and temperatures for her new book, My Vanishing Hometowns.

Thousands of students recently gathered outside the state capitol to protest higher education budget cuts.
Mallory Falk / WWNO

Governor John Bel Edwards has warned that Louisiana's budget crisis likely means even more cuts to higher education — up to $70 million — and big changes to the state's popular scholarship program, TOPS. For local students, that translates to an uncertain future.

Relay Graduate School of Education

Many of New Orleans charter schools are focused on preparation for college, especially for low-income students of color who would be the first in their families to go to college. But what about preparing these students for that big academic and cultural transition?

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Prisons are built on the supposition that time, discipline and routine transform inmates into new people. Nelson Davis has lived with this idea since 1980, when he arrived at the Louisiana State Penitentiary to fulfill a life sentence.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

As parades roll and people hit the streets for Carnival revelry, street food blossoms everywhere.

Cityscapes: New Orleans Almost Had A Monorail

Feb 4, 2016
Tulane Special Collections

New Orleans has various ways of transportation to get around the city including ferries, streetcars and buses.  However, in 1958 New Orleans planned to create a new form of getting around: a monorail. The idea of creating the monorail came from the city's urge to remain modern and keep up with Houston, which had recently passed New Orleans as the largest city in the region. 

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