All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city. Hosted by Jack Hopke.

Janet Wilson

There’s a special group of improvisers in New Orleans who want nothing more than to get hospital-bound kids to laugh. They're called Funny Bones Improv and on this week’s Notes from New Orleans, Sharon Litwin talks with two of their leaders: executive director, Janet Wilson, and local director and performer Emily Slazer. 

New Orleans Homelessness Issues Garner Attention

Dec 11, 2015

Since New Orleans' was announced as the winner of President Obama's challenge to house all homeless veterans last year, the city has seen a rise in interest on homelessness issues across the board.

ArtSpot Productions

This week on Inside the Arts, an ensemble of artists dedicated to creating live theater in New Orleans reaches a milestone. ArtSpot Productions is celebrating 20 years of original performances in the Crescent City. We talk with founding artistic director Kathy Randels.

Experiments In Sound: Noise Musicians In New Orleans

Dec 10, 2015
Greg Scott

Noise music: the two words sound like they should never be paired together, right? But for a small pocket of atypical musicians, swirling sounds that ebb and flow unpredictably are as necessary as Jackson Pollack's abstracts or Marcel Duchamp's found art.

Kelley Crawford sat down with a pair of noise musicians for NolaVie's Artist in Their Own Words.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

Voter ID Laws. Felon Rights. These topics aren’t foreign for teachers and students in Southern classrooms. But what happens when pressure to teach to the test prevents challenging conversations?

Sandra Knispel

In Mississippi, the Civil War still stirs emotions. It’s not so much that teachers disagree on how it should be taught, but that ongoing attempts by the University of Mississippi and several cities across the South to shed Confederate symbols have called up old ghosts. Mississippi Public Broadcasting's Sandra Knispel reports for the Southern Education Desk.

KIDsmART

Over the past year, local educational organizations have joined a new program funded by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. It’s called Any Given Child and it helps schools integrate artistic lessons into their curriculum. Echo Olander of KIDsmART has been essential to the program’s local development, and spoke with NolaVie’s Renee Peck about what they’ve learned and where they’re going.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

What should school children be taught about Islam? In Southern states such as Florida and North Carolina, parents claim students are being “indoctrinated” with a sanitized version of the Muslim faith. One of the fiercest fights so far is going on right now in Tennessee, possibly revealing the playbook for future battles.

Usama Dakdok, a traveling speaker, addressed an overflow crowd of about 300 people recently at the Christian Life First Assembly of God in the small Middle Tennessee town of Sparta.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

When you are down on your luck in Louisiana, dental care can be hard to come by. Medicare doesn’t cover it for adults, so many low-income people have to rely on volunteer dentists and special clinics that often have long waitlists. In Covington, the Food Bank has made helping these people a priority.

The Food Bank provides food for those in need, but they also have a thrift store, an emergency assistance center and a dental clinic. They call these their “core ministries,” and hope the services target the community’s primary needs.

Dan Carsen

Teaching subjects that trigger strong emotions and political divides is challenging. In the South, many of those fault-lines -- racial, religious and otherwise -- are intimately tied to its history. This week the Southern Education Desk is exploring how teachers tackle tough topics.

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