All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city.

Bobby Grier speaks with representatives from the Sugar Bowl in 1956.
The University of Pittsburgh / The University of Pittsburgh

Bobby Grier was the first African-American to play in the Sugar Bowl. As a member of the Pittsburgh Panthers, Grier played against Georgia Tech on January 2, 1956 — only months after Emmett Till was lynched in Mississippi and weeks after Rosa Parks was arrested in Alabama.

Perhaps as expected, his participation was met with opposition: the governor of Georgia insisted that Georgia Tech boycott the Sugar Bowl that year. But the game was played, Grier was its leading rusher, and the Civil Rights Movement continued to gain momentum.

The Big Chill: Specialty Ice and the Craft Cocktail Scene

Dec 29, 2016
Dominick / Flickr

With New Year’s Eve right around the corner, revelers may be thinking about what to fill up their glasses with as they ring in 2017. For Chuck Avery, owner of Melt New Orleans, it’s all in the ice. NolaVie’s David Benedetto spoke with Chuck about custom craft ice and its importance in the revival of the American cocktail.  

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by David Benedetto.

Jessica Rosgaard

This week on All Things New Orleans, we're sharing the joys of the holiday season through music! The NOLA Players recollect recording Christmastime in New Orleans, a sparkling holiday package of jazz performed in the spirit of the city and season.

Twitter has a theory about Santa Claus — he might be a lot farther south than the North Pole.

The tweet that started it all came from an account dedicated to celebrating "everything NOLA." It featured a photo of Santa, holding a baby as he does, and a caption: "If you're from New Orleans 9/10 you got pic with this Santa."

One look at the responses makes it obvious that the caption was not at all an exaggeration.

Thousands of people have shared and replied to the tweet — as scores of New Orleans natives are posting their pictures on the same Santa's lap.

Xavier University of Louisiana

The president of Xavier University, Dr. Reynold Verret, is known to many as the Renaissance of Renaissance men. From science to music to biking, and even to some pretty clever pranks, Dr. Verret is bringing his knowledge and charisma to Xavier. Kelley Crawford invited Dr. Verret into the studio as part of NolaVie's Notes from New Orleans series.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford.

Infrogmation of New Orleans

Fine art is becoming a virtual reality. More specifically, Google has compiled a vast, virtual museum to take online patrons into the collections of hundreds of institutions around the world. One of these Google Arts & Culture partners is the New Orleans Museum of Art. Renée Peck recently spoke with Seth Boonchai, digital assets manager at NOMA, about the evolution of their virtual museum.

Running of the Santas

Crowds of Santa lookalikes racing through the street might be a bizarre sight, until you remember that you’re in downtown New Orleans. In fact, that’s exactly what you’ll find next weekend, on December 17, when New Orleanians gather for the annual Running of the Santas. Brian Friedman sat down with organizer Steve Schulkens to get the backstory of an outrageous yet philanthropic holiday tradition.  

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Brian Friedman.

Richard Campanella

Each month Richard Campanella explores a different story of New Orleans' geography and architecture, with  WWNO News Director Eve Troeh.

After the sleek lines, steel and glass of Modern architecture was embraced by New Orleans in various forms from the 1920s to the early 1970s, it was firmly rejected as the century closed. Campanella chalks this up to sentiment about the city's economy, and its outlook for the future.

Infrogmation, 2006

In her first edition of All Things New Orleans, new host Janae Pierre shares some of her radio inspirations and her interests in the city. After the recent death of Edgar "Dooky" Chase Jr., we hear about the political legacy of the iconic restaurant he built with his family and wife Leah Chase. Plus, a new study shows the BP oil spill eroded wetlands more than previously thought. It's All Things New Orleans.

Derek Bridges / Flickr

When I woke up and checked the news, I could hardly believe what I was hearing. I stared at my screen in disbelief. This was really happening. This was the new reality. And there was nothing that I could do about it. I had to muster every ounce of inner strength I had just to say the words, to make them real, to accept that this was the truth.

“The New Orleans Zephyrs are now...the New Orleans Baby Cakes.”

Pages