All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city. Hosted by Jack Hopke.

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Features
4:38 pm
Fri March 13, 2015

Cityscapes: The Origins of New Orleans' Chinatown (And A Tennessee Williams Connection)

Chinese-Americans who had operated small shops in New Orleans' Chinatown for many decades learned on Aug. 20, 1937 that their small enclave was doomed to make way for a parking lot. Pictured in this 1937 photo in front of one of the shops on Tulane Avenue
Nola.com The Times-Picayune Archive

Every month WWNO talks to Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com. In this edition the Professor of Geography at the Tulane School of Architecture delves into the former Chinatown, and the history of Chinese-Americans in the city.

Chinese immigrants were first brought to Louisiana in hopes that they would work as inexpensive labor for sugar plantations after the Civil War. When that didn't work out, they began to move to the city.

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Food
4:35 pm
Thu March 12, 2015

Where Y'Eat: The Intersection Of St. Patrick's Day, St. Joseph's Day, And The Dentist's Chair

Danger ahead? Even the traditional foods of a St. Joseph's Day altar have led to the dentist's chair.
Ian McNulty

At the intersection of St. Patrick's Day and St. Joseph's Day in New Orleans, food-centric celebrations abound, but so do some unique hazards for the unwary.


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Coastal Desk
11:57 am
Thu March 12, 2015

FYI, The Front Yard Initiative For Better Water Management

Professor John Renne of UNO Planning and Urban Studies has more on the Front Yard Initiative, a pilot program to help homeowners turn concrete into green space. The idea, he says, has social, environmental and property value impact.

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Code Switch
10:58 am
Fri March 6, 2015

The Fascinating Story Of New Orleans' Two Lost Chinatowns

Chinese who operated small shops in New Orleans' Chinatown for many decades learned in 1937 that their small city-within-a-city was doomed to make way for a parking lot. Shown in front of one of the shops on Tulane Avenue between Elk Place and Rampart Street are Big Gee, seated, and Lee Sing, standing.
The Times-Picayune/Landov

New Orleans is known for its enormous Vietnamese population, one of the largest in the country. But we recently came across a story about a now-lost Chinatown in New Orleans — two of them, in fact — and how they came to be. To understand how these hubs came about, and why they disappeared, we have to rewind the clock 150 years, to the end of the Civil War.

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NOLA Life Stories
5:00 am
Wed March 4, 2015

NOLA Life Stories: Tom Benson's Journey To The Top

Tom Benson, pictured with wife Gayle and granddaughter Rita Benson LeBlanc, grew up in the St. Roch neighborhood and graduated from Brother Martin High School and Loyola University.
Credit Chuck Cook

When Tom Benson purchased the New Orleans Saints in 1985, the team had never had a winning season. Over the course of 30 years, Tom has helped reshape the team to become one of the NFL's most popular teams and a source of community pride throughout the Gulf South. 

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Community
5:49 pm
Tue March 3, 2015

Child Poverty Rates Same, Even As New Orleans' Economy Improves

Dr. Vicki Mack, Senior Researcher, The Data Center

A new report from the Data Center shows New Orleans’ rate of child poverty is still just as high as it was at the time of Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures, almost ten years ago. Senior Researcher Dr. Vicki Mack tells us about how New Orleans ranks nationally in child poverty, and some of the far-reaching consequences.

Mack notes that about 39 percent of children in New Orleans live in poverty. That puts New Orleans about ninth nationally, next to cities likes Cleveland and Toledo, even though the metro area's overall economy is better than those cities.

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Education
1:25 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Navigating The New Orleans School Enrollment Process

In the choice landscape, advertisements for charter schools - and the annual Schools Expo - appear on billboards and bus stops.
Credit Mallory Falk / WWNO

Applications to most New Orleans public schools are due this Friday. New Orleans is known as a "choice" landscape. Families apply to schools across the city, instead of automatically sending their children to the neighborhood school. But how much actual choice is there?

It's a Saturday morning and school marching bands play for a crowd. But they're not in a Mardi Gras parade. They're in the Superdome, at a schools expo. There's a bouncy house and a climbing wall. Things to keep kids occupied while their families learn about schools.

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Features
3:03 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

'Rock Star Nurse' Fights Ebola

Yanti Turang is an indie rock singer-turned-nurse and founder of Learn to Live. (learntoliveglobal.org)

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 9:31 am

As the threat of Ebola has left the U.S. and the story has left the headlines, people are still heading over to West Africa to fight the virus that has claimed nearly 10,000 lives.

Yanti Turang is one of those going. The indie rock band singer-turned-nurse and founder of the nonprofit LearnToLive is heading to Sierra Leone to help save lives.

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Community
1:55 pm
Fri February 20, 2015

Cityscapes: When Soil Subsidence Hits Home, Suburban Houses Explode

A 1975 explosion in Metairie, caused by broken gas lines due to soil subsidence.
G. E. Arnold, NOLA.com|The Times-Picayune archive

In this month's Cityscapes column at Nola.com, Tulane Professor of Geography Richard Campanella explores some very real consequences of draining urban wetlands for building.

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Arts & Culture
3:40 pm
Thu February 19, 2015

'Above Canal: Rights and Revival' Explores New Orleans' Civil Rights Legacy And Neighborhood Change

Jeanne Nathan of CANO and Keith Duncan in front of one of Duncan's works, "Times-Picayune," on display at the Myrtle Banks building, 1307 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., through Feb. 28
Eve Troeh WWNO

The art show “Above Canal: Rights and Revival” honors New Orleans' Civil Rights Movement legacy with archival photos of local actions, activists and leaders. This history is explored alongside contemporary art that speaks to themes of neighborhood change over time.

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