All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city. Hosted by Jack Hopke.

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Part One
1:53 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

Along Saint Claude: What's In A Name?

Dan Eaglin.
Credit Jonathan Traviesa

Over the course of 2013, I interviewed dozens and dozens of folks who live, or once lived, in the neighborhoods along both sides of St. Claude Avenue, roughly from St. Bernard to Poland Avenue. I asked them to share stories of their neighborhoods, what they’re like now, how they’ve changed, and how they feel about those changes. These voices became the makings of this seven-part radio documentary: Along Saint Claude.

Part 1: What's in a Name

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Music Features
11:09 am
Wed April 16, 2014

Already Missing French Quarter Fest? Here's A Mid-Week Playlist

Irvin Mayfield at French Quarter Fest this past Saturday.
Credit Ian Cook

The 2014 French Quarter Festival took place on a beautiful weekend... But it's been all rain and cold and work and traffic ever since.

Maybe you missed Gal Holiday belt out "That's How I Ride" because you were waiting in line for crawfish bread. Maybe you didn't catch Little Freddie King bang out "Cleo's Back" because you lost track of the time on the river, or ran to Gene's to get a daiquiri. Maybe you missed Dr. John because there were too many people! Or maybe you caught every act you intended to see, and now are twitching from FQF withdrawals (or shivering in the chill).

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Environment
7:30 am
Wed April 16, 2014

Barataria Bay, 4 Years After The Deepwater Horizon Disaster

Melanie Driscoll, director of bird conservation for Audubon's Louisiana Coastal Initiative, examines the remains of a Forster's Tern found on Cat Island. The island shows scant signs of life four years after the BP oil spill.
Credit Eileen Fleming / WWNO

As Sunday’s four-year anniversary of the BP oil spill approaches, environmental groups headed out into one of the areas most heavily oiled in the disaster. There, they looked at what effects that oil could be having on wetlands, and inspected the latest damage from coastal erosion, ongoing before and after the spill.

It takes about a half-hour on John Stubbs’ 22-foot fishing boat to get from the Myrtle Grove Marina in Plaquemines Parish to Bay Jimmy in Barataria Bay.

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Environment
2:40 am
Wed April 16, 2014

As La. Coast Recedes, Battle Rages Over Who Should Pay

Man-made canals built for the oil and gas industry cut through wetland. The industry argues those canals aren't to blame for coastal erosion.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 3:33 pm

Louisiana's coast is disappearing at the rate of about a football field an hour. Since the 1930s, the Gulf of Mexico has swallowed up an area the size of Delaware.

You can see the water encroaching in Delacroix in St. Bernard Parish, less than an hour southeast of New Orleans. Here, a narrow crescent of land known locally as the "end of the world" is where the road abruptly comes to a dead end; in the distance, you see the tops of now-submerged trees.

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NolaVie
5:11 am
Mon April 14, 2014

Sarah Vowell Riffs On Satchmo, 'The Incredibles' And Andrew Jackson

Sarah Vowell signing books after a lecture at Lamar Univ. in Beaumont, Texas
Credit Loren-zo / wikimedia commons

Noted writer, historian and former This American Life contributor Sarah Vowell will be in town to speak at Tulane’s Freeman Auditorium on Wednesday, April 16. And while she’s in town, the author of books like The Wordy Shipmates, Assassination Vacation and Unfamiliar Fishes will likely pay a visit to the New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts (NOCCA). She might also check out some of Louis Armstrong’s old haunts. 

But don’t count on Vowell to spend any time in Jackson Square.

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Documentary
12:08 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Along Saint Claude

Dan Eaglin.
Credit Jonathan Traviesa

Over the course of 2013, I interviewed dozens and dozens of folks who live, or once lived, in the neighborhoods along both sides of St. Claude Avenue, roughly from St. Bernard to Poland Avenue. I asked them to share stories of their neighborhoods, what they’re like now, how they’ve changed, and how they feel about those changes. These voices became the makings of this seven-part radio documentary: Along Saint Claude.

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Where Y'Eat
4:35 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Visions Of Street Food At French Quarter Fest

Cooking up a unique feast of New Orleans street food at French Quarter Festival.
Ian McNulty

Think New Orleans needs more street food? This weekend's French Quarter Festival is teeming with inspiration for new ideas.

Street food is a term that has a lot of cachet in the dining world these days. I just wish we could get our hands on it a little more.

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Community
4:02 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Richard Campanella Cityscapes: New Orleans' Tallest, Strangest, Forgotten Building

Old Shot Tower 1885
Courtesy Library of Congress

Each month geographer Richard Campanella shares a few insights from his Cityscapes column, found at Nola.com and the Times-Picayune. Today he describes a building that once defined the New Orleans skyline. It was a shot tower — a factory to produce ammunition.

We sat down to talk with Professor Campanella about the structure.

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Music
1:27 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

50 Years For 'Chapel of Love', The Dixie Cups' #1 Hit

The original Dixie Cups: Barbara Ann and Rosa Lee Hawkins with Joan Marie Johnson.
Courtesy of Barbara Hawkins

Fifty years ago the Beatles crossed over to America, and it seemed no one could unseat them from the top of the charts. But three girls from New Orleans' Calliope housing project did just that, edging out the Fab Four in 1964 to score a #1 Billboard hit.

The Dixie Cups' "Chapel of Love" featured the harmonies of sisters Barbara Ann and Rosa Lee Hawkins, along with their cousin Joan Marie Johnson. Though Hurricane Katrina took them from New Orleans, they’re back to play French Quarter Fest this Saturday at 2 p.m. This is the story of their enduring hit.

 

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Arts & Culture
1:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Talking Cinema With Filmmaker Henry Griffin

sailko

Henry Griffin is an Artist in Residence in film at the University of New Orleans. He joins us each month to discuss an aspect of the movie scene in and around New Orleans. This installment? Revival houses, pop-ups, outdoor spaces and other places to see movies besides the major multiplex.

Henry's suggestions for a few places to catch an old film the way it was meant to be seen: in a group audience.

Classic theaters:

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