All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city.

Infrogmation, 2006

In her first edition of All Things New Orleans, new host Janae Pierre shares some of her radio inspirations and her interests in the city. After the recent death of Edgar "Dooky" Chase Jr., we hear about the political legacy of the iconic restaurant he built with his family and wife Leah Chase. Plus, a new study shows the BP oil spill eroded wetlands more than previously thought. It's All Things New Orleans.

Derek Bridges / Flickr

When I woke up and checked the news, I could hardly believe what I was hearing. I stared at my screen in disbelief. This was really happening. This was the new reality. And there was nothing that I could do about it. I had to muster every ounce of inner strength I had just to say the words, to make them real, to accept that this was the truth.

“The New Orleans Zephyrs are now...the New Orleans Baby Cakes.”

Eve Troeh/WWNO

It's been over 100 days since floodwaters rose up to the rooftops in parts of Baton Rouge, La. The so-called 1,000-year flood hit neighborhoods that had never seen such a disaster. But to some flood victims, it was all too familiar - those who moved to Baton Rouge from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina about a decade ago.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

On Sunday, the local youth group BreakOUT! held a day of action in Armstrong Park. It was part of an international day to honor all transgender people who died by violence in the past year.

Cityscapes: How New Orleans Embraced The Modern

Nov 17, 2016
Courtesy NOPSI

Each month WWNO talks to Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column in Nola.com | The Times-Picayune. In a chronology exploring how various architectural styles swept the city, Modernism started its chapter in the 1920s. The ideas behind it, however, had roots in the 1800s.

Max Trombly

What do Bourbon Street, the film Cabaret, and the word “extravaganza” have in common? They are all linked in some way to the art of burlesque dancing. NolaVie’s David Benedetto recently dove into the art form with longtime performer Bella Blue. Bella is a member of the Foxglove Revue and serves as the Headmistress of the New Orleans School of Burlesque.

MGN Julie Cardona

About 67 percent of Louisana's eligible voters turned out to cast ballots on Election Day. The state's eight electoral votes went to the Republican nominee, Donald Trump, as expected. This week's All Things New Orleans dives deeper into down-ballot races in Louisiana.

NPR News and New Orleans Public Radio are offering special coverage of Election Night 2016, as voters go to the polls on Tuesday, November 8.

Here in New Orleans, News Director Eve Troeh will be joined by Advocate columnist Stephanie Grace to provide live updates and analysis of local and statewide races. Local and national coverage begins at 8 p.m. CT and will air through 10 p.m., and national coverage from NPR will continue until at least 4 a.m.

The $438 million dollars already approved by Congress for flood recovery won't be enough to help all of the households that qualify as top priority.

This from the Restore Louisiana Task Force, which has announced a set of guidelines to prioritize the distribution of federal relief money to help Louisiana families recover from the devastating August floods.

Finn McCool's New Owner Takes A Seat at the Pub

Nov 3, 2016
J. Regan / Flickr

Sean Kennedy has been known as the Irishman and patron of Finn McCool’s, and he’s now known as the Irishman and new owner of Finn McCool’s. After years of working tirelessly and building a tight community in their Mid-City pub, Stephen and Pauline Patterson have passed the torch on to Sean, who’s more than up to the challenge. Especially if there’s soccer involved.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford.  

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