All Things Considered

Weekdays starting at 4 p.m.
Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel
Jack Hopke

In-depth reporting that transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special — sometimes quirky — features.

With the GNO Info Minute at 5:59 p.m.

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Hurricane Isaac
4:47 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Mayor Landrieu: The City Is Secure

National Hurricane Center

New Orleans police are getting some help in securing the city during Hurricane Isaac. The Louisiana National Guard is on duty.

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Sports
4:22 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Debate Pits Strasburg's Health Against Wins

Stephen Strasburg of the Washington Nationals pitches against the Atlanta Braves at Nationals Park last week.
Patrick McDermott Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:52 pm

One of the biggest debates in Washington, D.C., these days has nothing to do with taxes, health care or the economy. It's about baseball and whether the Washington Nationals should end the season of their young pitching star, Stephen Strasburg, just as the team may be headed for the playoffs.

Two years ago, Strasburg's promising career was threatened when he tore a ligament in his pitching arm. He needed surgery and couldn't pitch for a year.

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
4:22 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Parks Vie For Space In Miami's Forest Of Condos

The skyline of the northern Brickell neighborhood in downtown Miami. Its residential population has more than doubled in the past decade.
Marc Averette Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:52 pm

Many cities around the nation are trying to revive their downtowns, adding more apartments and condominiums — usually high-rises — to lure new residents.

But as urban dwellers grow in numbers, they need places to get outside. Yet, in many cities, like Miami, neighborhood parks can be hard to find. The Trust for Public Land ranks Miami 94 on a list of 100 cities when it comes to park acreage per 1,000 residents — just 2.8 acres per 1,000 residents, versus 4.5 in New York and 6.2 in Los Angeles.

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Music
3:56 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Dan Deacon On Computers, College And 'Electronic Music'

Dan Deacon's latest project combines his signature electronic sound with live musicians and instruments.
Shawn Brackbrill Courtesy of Domino Records

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:52 pm

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House & Senate Races
3:56 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Texas Senate Candidate Ted Cruz A Rising GOP Star

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:52 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

As the Republican convention kicks off in Tampa, the party will highlight some of the politicians who could be its future stars. We're going to hear about two of them now who both speak tonight. In a moment, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, tonight's keynote speaker. But first, the Republican Senate candidate Ted Cruz. If he wins in November he'll be the first Hispanic senator from Texas.

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Hurricane Isaac
3:51 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Mayor Landrieu: It's a Hurricane and New Orleans is on the Front Lines

It may not look like much now — but there's a hurricane on the way. Hurricane Isaac is picking up power, and the outer rain bands have already begun impacting the metro region.

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Election 2012
3:27 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Paul Ryan Had A Black Girlfriend

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:52 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, a non-story that's kicked off a very real conversation about race in America. In 2005, Congressman Paul Ryan, Mitt Romney's vice presidential running mate, told a Milwaukee magazine that he has a black sister-in-law. He also said that in his bachelor past he had a black girlfriend. A CNN blogger gave the interview new life a few days ago. But what, if anything, does this glimpse into Ryan's past tell us about how inclusive his politics would be as vice president?

NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates went in search of some answers.

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NPR Story
3:27 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

London's Paralympics Set To Be The Biggest Yet

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:52 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The torch has been lit for the Paralympics, and it will travel now to the same stadium in London that was home to the Olympics for opening ceremonies tomorrow. More than 4,000 athletes, with all sorts of impairments - amputees, the blind, the intellectually impaired - will compete in events including swimming, cycling, rowing, wheelchair basketball and sitting volleyball, to name just a few.

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NPR Story
3:27 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Gulf Coast Residents Brace For Hurricane Isaac

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:52 pm

Debbie Elliott has spent the day driving along the Mississippi coast as people prepare for Isaac. The storm has dumped heavy rain across the area. She speaks with Audie Cornish from Gulfport, Mississippi.

The Two-Way
3:25 pm
Tue August 28, 2012

Malcolm Browne, Journalist Who Took The 'Burning Monk' Photo, Dies

Journalist Malcome Browne took this iconic photo of the self-immolation of Buddhist monk Thich Quang Duc in Saigon in 1963. The monk committed suicide to protest what he called government persecution of Buddhists. Browne, who worked for the AP and later The New York Times, died Monday at age 81.
Malcom Browne AP

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 9:36 pm

Malcolm Browne was a first-rate reporter who spent decades at The New York Times, covered wars around the world and won the Pulitzer Prize for his writing about the early days of the Vietnam war.

And yet he will forever be remembered for one famous picture, the 1963 photo of a Buddhist monk who calmly set himself on fire on the streets of Saigon to protest against the South Vietnamese government, which was being supported by the U.S.

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