All Things Considered

Weekdays starting at 4 p.m.
Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel
Jack Hopke

In-depth reporting that transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special — sometimes quirky — features.

With the GNO Info Minute at 5:59 p.m.

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Code Switch
4:12 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Ralph Ellison: No Longer The 'Invisible Man' 100 Years After His Birth

Ralph Ellison in 1957, four years after his novel Invisible Man won the National Book Award. Ellison died in 1994.
James Whitmore The Life Picture Collection/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

A monument outside 730 Riverside Drive in Harlem, N.Y. — writer Ralph Ellison's longtime home — commemorates his life and his work. The marker, and many biographical sources, list his birth date as being 1914. But in fact, he was born a year earlier.

Still, events in Oklahoma City — his birthplace — and New York City, where he spent most of his life, are celebrating the centennial of his birth this year.

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Around the Nation
4:05 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

In Nod To History, A Crumbling Philly Row House Gets A Funeral

Historian Patrick Grossi stops in front of 3711 Melon St. during a walking tour through Mantua. On Saturday, this house will be torn down — and will receive an elaborate memorial service.
Emma Lee WHYY

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

This weekend, an old, dilapidated row house will be torn down in Philadelphia. That's not unusual — it happens all the time in Philly's blighted neighborhoods.

But this house is getting an elaborate memorial service, complete with a eulogy, a church choir and a community procession. It's called "Funeral for a Home," and local artists and historians are using the event as a way to honor the changing history of the neighborhood.

An Old, Ugly Building, Ready To Fall

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Humans
4:04 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

What's In A Grunt — Or A Sigh, Or A Sob? Depends On Where You Hear It

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR news this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Hear a laugh, you know someone's happy. Hear a sob, you know someone is sad. Or are they? It's been thought that no matter where you live in the world, people express emotions using the same repertoire of sounds. But NPR's social science correspondent, Shankar Vedantam, reports on new research on how emotions are expressed and understood around the globe.

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From Our Listeners
3:16 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Letters: Maya Angelou And Doc Holliday

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read letters from listeners about a mistaken Wild West reference and the death of the poet Maya Angelou.

World
3:16 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Activist Icon Resigns, As The Threads Of Her Stories Unravel

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Somaly Mam has been arguably that world's highest profile crusader against sex trafficking. The Cambodian activist has been named one of Time Magazine's Most Influential People. Last year, Secretary of State John Kerry called her a hero every single day. Actress Susan Sarandon, and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg sit on the board of the foundation that bears her name.

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Movies
3:16 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

With Possible Theme Park, 'Hunger Games' May Live Beyond Final Film

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 6:07 pm

The movie studio Lionsgate is exploring the possibility of a theme park based on The Hunger Games films and books. To test the idea's viability, the company announced that it will launch a Hunger Games exhibition at museums around the country next summer.

All Tech Considered
5:04 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Think Internet Data Mining Goes Too Far? Then You Won't Like This

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 6:32 pm

These days, you can hop on the Internet and buy yourself a consumer-grade brain scanning device for just a few hundred dollars. Technically, they're called brain computer interfaces, or BCIs. As these devices develop, researchers are thinking a few steps ahead — they're worried about how to keep marketers from scanning our brains.

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The Salt
4:30 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Economic Upswing Has Fewer Americans Receiving Food Stamps

A woman and her daughter shop at a Greenmarket in New York City using Electronic Benefits Transfer, or food stamps. Government data show that fewer people were receiving the benefits in February 2014 than at the peak in December 2012.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 6:11 pm

Critics of the food stamp program have been alarmed in recent years by its rapid growth. Last year, about 1 in 7 people in the U.S. received food stamps, or SNAP benefits, as they're called. That's almost 48 million people, a record high.

But the numbers have started to drop. In February, the last month for which figures were available, 1.6 million fewer people received food stamps than at the peak in December 2012, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which runs the program.

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Shots - Health News
4:16 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Ready, Set, Spray! Brazil Battles Dengue Ahead Of The World Cup

The World Cup will come to the Arena de Sao Paola, shown here when it was under construction last fall. Brazil is also making a big push to control the local mosquitoes that can spread dengue fever.
Friedemann Vogel Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 6:11 pm

In Sao Paulo's poor north zone, in the neighborhood of Tucuruvi, teams of city workers knock on doors, warning people to take pets and small children out of the area.

Quickly after, men in hazmat suits with metal cylinders strapped to their backs start spraying the street, and some of the interiors of the homes, with powerful pesticides. This is the front line of the war on dengue fever in Brazil's largest city.

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Politics
3:48 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

'Morning Edition' Friday: An Obama Critic On The West Point Speech

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 6:11 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

President Obama mapped out his vision for foreign policy yesterday in a commencement speech at West Point. Obama was taking on criticism that his approach to global affairs has been too cautious. But Republicans weren't any more satisfied after that speech. Tomorrow morning we'll hear from one of his biggest critics.

SENATOR BOB CORKER: I would suggest that he takes a speech that he did yesterday, throw it in the circular file, start again with something much more decisive and clear.

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