Parallels
6:52 am
Tue October 15, 2013

What The World's Newspapers Are Saying

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 12:31 pm

(Editor's Note: Starting this week, we're introducing a weekday feature of headlines from newspapers around the world.)

Britain's Guardian reports on former minister David Maclean, a member of Prime Minister David Cameron's Conservative Party, who says Britain's spy agencies may be operating outside the law in the mass surveillance of the Internet. His remarks come amid revelations about surveillance programs unveiled by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

In the Middle East, Israel's Haaretz newspaper reports on negotiations between Western nations and Iran in Geneva over the Islamic republic's nuclear program. It says the U.S. will continue to pressure Tehran until it has taken major steps to halt the program.

Lebanon's Daily Star reports that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said an international conference to set up a transitional government in Syria must be organized soon.

South Africa's Cape Times says a veteran member of the African National Congress lodged a complaint against a fellow party official for making allegedly anti-Semitic comments in Cape Town last week.

The China Daily reports on Britain's plan to make it easier for Chinese tourists and investors to visit the country.

India's Hindu newspaper says three senior officials were suspended in the wake of the deadly stampede near a temple in the town of Ratangarh in the central state of Madhya Pradesh. More than 100 people were killed in the stampede on a bridge that people feared was near collapse.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.