Wallis Watkins

Wallis Watkins is a Baton Rouge native. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Philosophy from Louisiana State University in 2013. Soon after, she joined WRKF as an intern and is now reporting on health and health policy for Louisiana's Prescription.

Debate in the House Criminal Justice committee Wednesday was focused on how to untangle a Louisiana law from the the racial injustice that produced it over a century ago.

At the center of it all was a bill by Sen. JP Morrell (D-New Orleans). 

One of the hardest fought battles every year in Louisiana’s Legislature is whether or not to fully fund the TOPS scholarship program. Rep. Franklin Foil (R-Baton Rouge) wants to bring an end to that annual struggle. 

Lawmakers in the House were able to get just enough votes to pass a budget that cuts $650 million in spending. Now, it’s up to the Senate to determine what happens next. 

Lawmakers have agreed on moving one bill forward to address sexual harassment in state government. As it stands now, Louisiana doesn’t have a standard sexual harassment policy on the books.

With $350 million more to spend in next year’s budget, The House Appropriations committee voted Monday to fully fund the TOPS scholarship program. 

With the news that next year’s revenue is expected to improve by $350 million, the Legislature is officially facing a smaller budget shortfall of $650 million.  On Monday, House Appropriations is meeting to determine how to spend that additional revenue in next year’s budget. 

Joby Richard/LSU Manship School News Service.

As part of a collaboration between WWNO and WRKF in Baton Rouge, we bring you the Capitol Access Recap - a weekly review of what happened in the state Legislature.

Lawmakers in Louisiana got good news Thursday. The state’s fiscal cliff isn’t quite as bad as previously expected.

People currently on parole, probation or in prison can’t vote in Louisiana. A bill from Rep. Pat Smith (D-Baton Rouge) would change that.  Once someone is out of prison for five years, their voting rights would be restored. 

A Senate committee has approved abolishing the death penalty in Louisiana. The bill’s author, Sen. JP Morrell (D-New Orleans), says the death penalty is ineffective. 

Pages