Travis Lux

Coastal Reporter

Travis is WWNO's coastal reporter. His reporting has covered a wide range of topics -- from science and health to arts and culture. His stories have aired on local public radio stations and national shows.

Before joining WWNO, Travis reported for Marfa Public Radio in Far West Texas, and for WRKF in Baton Rouge. He he studied Anthropology and Sociology at Rhodes College and radio production at the Transom Story Workshop. 

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Travis Lux / WWNO

The weather is warm, Mardi Gras is over and it’s festival season. That means, time for crawfish boils.

 

Despite the slow start to crawfish season, officials held a celebration Tuesday to mark the opening of the season. But for the second year in a row, one crawfish got off a little easy.

Michael Maples / U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: Louisiana files a lawsuit against the Army Corps of Engineers, how the latest federal budget could speed up sediment diversions and a pair of pollution-related settlements.

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: An update on the bug destroying the bird’s foot marsh, some research from the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science conference and the environmental consequences of glitter.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Countries across the world are starting to ban some microplastics. Like microbeads — the tiny pieces of plastic used in soap and face washes.

 

This time of year in New Orleans, it’s almost raining plastic, from beads to glitter. Lots of glitter. But what happens to all that sparkly stuff after it washes away? WWNO’s Travis Lux took a look at the environmental consequences of glitter.

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com|The Times-Picayune

The bounty of the Louisiana Coast has helped make New Orleans a food capital. But humans have put the once-plentiful resources — like fish — at risk. 

On this week's coastal news roundup, Nola.com/Times-Picayune environmental reporters Sara Sneath and Tristan Baurick talk about how chefs, fishermen and companies are fighting to keep Louisiana on the food map.

Louisiana State University

LSU unveiled a big, new model of the lower Mississippi River Monday. It will be used to simulate floods and help the state figure out how to use the river to rebuild the coast.

High Contrast / Wikimidia Commons (CC BY 3.0 DE)

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: Louisiana debates bringing a Russian fish and an update on pollution trading. Plus, some dubious claims about alligators.

 

WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with reporter Tristan Baurick, from Nola.com/The Times Picayune, about the week in coastal news.

Scott Akerman / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Sewerage and Water Board answered questions from New Orleans city council members Tuesday about the impact of last week’s freeze, but the agency is still taking stock.

Ryan Utz / Chatham University

A new study shows waterways across the country are getting saltier — including the Mississippi River. That has implications for the ecosystem and for drinking water.

 

The salt comes from two main places. Road salt — which is used to help melt ice and snow on roadways — and also agricultural fertilizers. Fertilizers often have potassium in them, which is a salt.

US Patent Office

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with its NOLA versus Nature series. This week: WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson and Travis Lux look at the city’s drainage pumps, and the man behind their design -- Albert Baldwin Wood.

New Orleans is below sea level. You know this, and certainly, if you were here this past August, you really know this. Almost a foot of rain fell over a couple hours and parts of town were knee deep in water.

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