Travis Lux

Coastal Reporter

Travis is WWNO's coastal reporter. His reporting has covered a wide range of topics -- from science and health to arts and culture. His stories have aired on local public radio stations and national shows.

Before joining WWNO, Travis reported for Marfa Public Radio in Far West Texas, and for WRKF in Baton Rouge. He he studied Anthropology and Sociology at Rhodes College and radio production at the Transom Story Workshop. 

Ways to Connect

US Patent Office

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with its NOLA versus Nature series. This week: WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson and Travis Lux look at the city’s drainage pumps, and the man behind their design -- Albert Baldwin Wood.

New Orleans is below sea level. You know this, and certainly, if you were here this past August, you really know this. Almost a foot of rain fell over a couple hours and parts of town were knee deep in water.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The state’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) wants feedback on its list of projects for the next year. Officials are holding a series of public meetings. The first meeting was last night in Belle Chasse.

 

The state’s big-picture plan to protect and restore the coast is updated every five years — it includes plans for things like river diversions and rebuilding marshes. That’s the Master Plan. But the money for those projects is approved on a yearly basis — the Annual Plan.

Deepwater Horizon Response / Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

It’s a new year and time to check back in on the coast. WWNO’s Travis Lux talks to Tristan Baurick from Nola.com/The Times-Picayune about the week in coastal news.

 

This week: the Trump administration looks to expand offshore drilling. Plus, Louisiana considers a new idea: pollution trading.

Xavier Badosa / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

People love talking about the weather. And we did a lot of talking during this year's busy hurricane season. Turns out the weather has a way of showing up in music — but less now than it used to.

 

WWNO’s Travis Lux talked with Paul Williams, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Reading in the UK, who studies how musicians write about the weather. He hopes climate change will inspire more weather-related music.

 

Travis Lux / WWNO

More than 20,000 scientists from around the world came to New Orleans this week for the American Geophysical Union conference. From minerals and volcanoes to oceans, space, and climate change -- they presented all kinds of research.

 

Sara Sneath from Nola.com/The Times-Picayune was there. So was WWNO’s Travis Lux. This week on the Coastal News Roundup, they met up at the conference to talk about the latest in coastal research.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Every summer, a "dead zone" forms in the Gulf of Mexico. It’s an area where the oxygen is so low that aquatic mammals can't survive. This year the dead zone was the biggest on record.

 

Tulane University has awarded $1 million to a company to help shrink it.

LA SAFE

Louisiana’s Coastal Master plan focuses on restoring and protecting the coast: Building levees, marshes and land. But even with those investments, the state still expects to deal with flooding in the future. Many communities are still going to have to figure out how adapt for the long term.

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com|The Times-Picayune

Every Friday, coastal reporters from WWNO and Nola.com | The Times-Picayune come together to talk about the week in coastal news.

This week: a platform fire in the Gulf, concern around Sewerage and Water Board contracts and an effort to rebuild the coast from the sky.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The New Orleans City Council questioned the leadership of the Sewerage and Water Board Tuesday about their plan for hiring more employees.

 

Some residents and council members worry the utility is on the path toward privatization.

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