Thais St. Julien

Co-Host, Continuum

Thaïs St. Julien has performed everything from Gregorian chant to Gershwin, appearing in recitals, concerts and opera across the U.S.  The New Orleans native is co-director (with founder Milton Scheuermann)of New Orleans Musica da Camera, performing music of the 11th through 19th centuries.  She created and directs the group’s  women’s vocal ensemble, Vox Feminae, sometimes writing and arranging music for them. She and Scheuermann co-host the ensemble’s weekly program of early music, Continuum, aired on  WWNO 89.9FM, streamed on Twelve Musica da Camera productions featuring the soprano as soloist have been broadcast on National Public Radio, American Public Radio and Public Radio International.

Her passion for 18th and 19th century New Orleans music has led to lectures and performances across the country. She was featured on the internationally acclaimed series “Creole Cameos” produced by WWNO, and “Arc Light”, a video series produced by Amistad Research Center. The soprano has recorded for the Newport Classics, Centaur, Belle Alliance and Clark Constructions record labels. Her closest brush with the movies was as historic music advisor for “Interview with the Vampire”.

Recipient of the 2007 Louisiana Artist Fellowship in Music, St. Julien is also a artist, and has received a Gambit “Tribute to the Classical Arts” Life Time Achievement Award and the Historic District Landmarks Commission’s Pioneer in Preservation Honor Award. She’s also profiled in several Marquis “Who’s Who” publications.

When not reading a mystery novel or doing historical research, she’s a magician, (it’s a performance art, after all, not that much different from music). She also belongs to some nifty organizations - the International Brotherhood of Magicians, the Society of American Magicians, the Knights of Slights and Mensa.

Ways to Connect

Continuum presents a program of the harpsichord music of Johann Sebastian Bach, played by the legendary harpsichordist Wanda Landowska. The major woks to be heard are the Chromatic Fantasia, and the Italian Concerto.

This program is music from the medieval manuscript of the romance of Fauvel, a tawny colored horse who rises to prominence in the French 14th century royal court. It is one of the most famous collections of medieval music in existence.

Continuum presents a program of Renaissance Band Music. The musical band is a group of specialized musicians usually playing various types of wind instruments sometimes with added vocals.

The songs of Oswald von Wolkenstein, the 15th century minnesinger, the German counterpart of the French troubadour and trouvere, are featured on this Continuum program.

Early Music of the Garden is presented by Continuum on this program. Four different aspects of the "early" garden are visited: The Garden of Earthly Delights, Dreams in a Pleasure Garden, A Dance in the Garden of Mirth, and When Birds Do Sing.

Continuum presents a highly spirited program of joyful songs and dances featuring cheerful sounds and ringing melodies of the late-medieval period. Bombards, shawms, lutes, harps and gitterns provide a rich program of music, with songs and instrumental music from Spain, Italy, France and Britain.

This week’s Continuum features music by the 14th century French composer Guillaume de Machaut, known as the last great poet who was also a composer. His music for the Mass of Notre Dame represents the first known medieval Mass by a known composer.

Continuum presents delightful catches and ballads of Merry Old England— 300 years ago. Featured will be Songs from the Tavern, Dancing in the Grass, Tobacco and Other Stimulants, and Men and Maids.

This week Continuum presents A Flemish Feast, featuring music of the Netherlands — including songs and dances that were very popular during the Renaissance.

Continuum presents a program by the outstanding early music ensemble Sequentia, now in its thirty-eighth year of performing medieval music, some of which has been hitherto unknown.

This program focuses of two major works from around the year 1200, The Story of Samson & Delilah and The Labors of Hercules. These two pieces are in the form of narrative lais, a medieval type of story telling in a vocal style prevalent in medieval times.