Sue Lincoln

Sue Lincoln is a veteran reporter in the political arena. Her radio experience began in the early ’80s, in “the other L-A” — Los Angeles.

Since her transplantation to Louisiana 25 years ago, she has covered the state, the capital, and its colorful cast of characters for Louisiana Radio Network, LPB and the Southern Education Desk.

Now she’s focusing her experience and expertise on producing WRKF’s Capitol Access.

Louisiana keeps pounding its fists against what Thomas Jefferson called the “wall of separation of church and state”. For example, Louisiana is not complying with the marriage decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in Obergefell v. Hodges.

“Marriage, as an institution between a man and a woman, was established by God. It cannot be altered by an earthly court,” Governor Bobby Jindal told the press, during a campaign stop in Iowa Friday.

It’s time to look at some of the reactions to Bobby Jindal’s official announcement of his presidential run.

Well before he took the stage in Kenner Wednesday, the so-called “spy cam video” was released. In it, Bobby and Supriya tell their kids of the decision to seek the White House.

“Okay, if we move into the White House, you can have a puppy,” Bobby tells daughter Selia.

“Can I pick out the puppy?” she asks.

The video was widely panned, with Newsweek calling it “odd and awkward”, and Rolling Stone describing it as “creepy”.

For the past half-dozen years, he has lulled us with this litany: “Look, I’ve got the job that I want. Really, I’ve got the job that I want.”

But that job is about over, so now he has finally ‘fessed up.

“My name is Bobby Jindal.  I am governor of the great state of Louisiana, and I am running for President of the greatest country in the world—the United States of America!”


"The right of personal privacy includes the abortion decision." So said the U.S. Supreme Court in 1973's Roe v. Wade decision. But 42 years later in federal court in Baton Rouge, lawyers working for major policy groups on either side of the issue are arguing about restrictions on that personal private decision.


When the Bond Commission met last Thursday, nothing was said publicly about the precarious situation with the state’s credit rating. Behind the scenes, though, it’s a different story.

“I’ve got a conference call with them Monday,” state Treasurer John Kennedy said in an interview, after the meeting.

Prior to the governor signing the new budget into law Friday, the Jindal administration had conference calls with Moody’s, Fitch, and S&P last week, to which Kennedy was not invited. Instead, he’s remedying that presumed oversight today.

With all the uncertainty over the budget at session’s end, I wasn’t able to share with you one of the legislature’s charming traditions—the end-of-term farewells.

“Farewell speeches, you know they’re not really farewell. Y’all get that, right?” Rep. Karen St. Germain asked during her speech.

For the 21 term-limited lawmakers leaving the Legislature, it was a chance to say public thank-yous, shed a few tears, and reminisce on their time at the Capitol.

 The final half-hour of the 2015 legislative session seemed more like an auction than lawmaking, as the House approved dozens of bills in the last 30 minutes. When the gavel came down at 6 p.m. Thursday, nobody was quite sure what-all we had bought — not even Gov. Jindal.

“The process isn’t over,” Jindal told reporters during a post-session press conference. “Obviously, we do want to look carefully through every bill for any unintended consequences.”

“We stand here and declare the 2015 regular session adjourned sine die.”

With that, the 2015 legislative session came to a close. The uncertainty and drama continued right up to the 6 p.m. deadline, but the legislature did pass a budget supported by tax increases. They also passed the SAVE plan offset, after all.

Earlier in the day, it appeared dead.

The House spent much of Tuesday giving the Senate the finger.

“Which finger?” Speaker Chuck Kleckley joked at one point.

Although House members did concur with Senate amendments on some bills, when it came to the revenue raising measures — seven bills in the so-called “tax package” — the House rejected what the Senate had done.

Some rejections, like the cigarette tax increase, were tough. The author of that bill, Rep. Hal Ritchie, made a plea for the members to agree with raising the cigarette tax to $1.08 per pack, instead of the $0.68 per pack the House had okayed.

“Who the hell cares what Grover says?”

Apparently the Senate does, while the House could not care less. The Senate passed their “new and improved” version of the budget Monday, with the SAVE plan included, although Sen. Karen Carter Peterson did try to take SAVE out.

“It would take Grover Norquist out of the business of budgeting in the state of Louisiana,” Peterson said, arguing for her amendment to HB 1 -- the budget bill – which failed, 13-26.

Over in the House, there was an attempt to add the SAVE plan language to Adley’s SB 93. Rep. John Bel Edwards and the amendment’s author, Rep. Alan Seabaugh, discussed what SAVE is—and does.

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