Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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The Two-Way
12:26 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

International Court Resolves Border Dispute In Cambodia's Favor

A Cambodian soldier looks across at the Thai border from the ancient Preah Vihear temple complex in Feb. 2011.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:08 pm

The International Court of Justice in the Hague has ruled that a disputed promontory that surrounds a 1,000-year-old Hindu temple belongs to Cambodia and said forces from neighboring Thailand should pack up and leave.

The conflict over the 2.8-mile Preah Vihear promontory has led to several skirmishes and exchanges of artillery fire between Thai and Cambodian forces in recent years.

In 1962, the same court ruled that the temple complex was on Cambodian soil but left open the question of exactly where the border around it should be drawn.

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The Two-Way
11:58 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Air Force Officer Acquitted Of Groping Woman At Bar

Lt. Col. Jeffrey Krusinski, who led the Air Force's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response unit, is seen leaving the Arlington County General District Court, in July.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 8:02 pm

Lt. Col. Jeffrey Krusinski, who once oversaw the Air Force's sexual assault response team, was found not guilty of groping a 23-year-old woman at a bar in Virginia earlier this year.

The jury of five men and two women in Arlington, Va., deliberated for an hour and 15 minutes before deciding to acquit Krusinski, 42 on a charge of misdemeanor assault. His accuser had said he grabbed her backside on May 5 outside a Crystal City bar.

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The Two-Way
5:29 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Four Marines Killed In Camp Pendleton Training Accident

Marine Corps recruits train at the Edson Firing Range at Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base in 2008.
Denis Poroy AP

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 5:41 pm

Four Marines have been killed in a training accident at Camp Pendleton, near San Diego, Calif., base officials said.

The Associated Press says the accident occurred at 11 a.m. Wednesday "during a range maintenance operation."

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The Two-Way
3:16 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Police: British Spy's Strange Death Was 'Probably An Accident'

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 2:46 pm

Scotland Yard says it believes a British spy whose naked, decomposing body was found padlocked inside a gym bag in a bathtub three years ago, probably died accidentally.

Gareth Williams, 31, was working for Britain's MI6 spy agency when his body was found at his home in August 2010.

Last May, a coroner concluded that Williams was probably murdered, but on Wednesday London Police Deputy Assistant Commissioner Martin Hewitt told reporters that the death was "most probably ... an accident."

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The Two-Way
3:15 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Navy Yanks Admirals' Access To Classified Material

Vice Adm. Ted Branch, the director of naval intelligence, was one of two top officers to have their access to classified material suspended.
U.S. Navy

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 3:42 pm

Two of the nation's top naval intelligence officers, Vice Adm. Ted Branch and Rear Adm. Bruce Loveless, have had their access to classified material suspended in connection with a bribery scandal involving a Singapore-based contractor.

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The Two-Way
3:08 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Survey Finds Anti-Semitism 'On The Rise' In Europe

A counterprotester lifts a homemade sign during a demonstration of the nationalist party in downtown Budapest, Hungary, on May 4.
Attila Kisbenedek AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 7:17 pm

Two-thirds of Jews surveyed in a European Union study believe that anti-Semitism is "a problem" where they live and three-quarters said they believed that anti-Jewish attitudes had increased in recent years.

The EU's Fundamental Rights Agency sampled opinion from 5,847 Jewish people in Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Sweden and the United Kingdom — which collectively are home to 90 percent of Europe's Jews.

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The Two-Way
3:07 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Bolivian Skull Ceremony Blends Ancient Rite With Catholicism

Believers attend a mass in a chapel with their "natitas" (flat-nosed) human skulls, at the cemetery in La Paz on Friday.
Aizar Raldes AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 6:07 pm

Hundreds of Bolivians had human skulls blessed at a chapel in La Paz in an annual ceremony on Friday that mixes traditional Andean ancestor worship with Roman Catholic customs.

The skulls, called "natitas" – "flat noses" in the local Aymara indigenous language — are ideally from unknown people and are collected from abandoned cemeteries, but some are of long dead relatives, according to The Associated Press.

The news agency says:

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The Two-Way
1:47 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Astronomers Find Bizarre 'Lawn Sprinkler' Asteroid

These NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope images reveal a never-before-seen set of six comet-like tails radiating from a body in the asteroid belt designated P/2013 P5.
NASA, ESA, D. Jewitt (University of California, Los Angeles), J. Agarwal (Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research), H. Weaver (Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory), M. Mutchler (STScI), and S. Larson (University of Arizona)

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 4:11 pm

Astronomers using both ground- and space-based telescopes have discovered a new kind of asteroid that sports not one, but six comet-like tails, and has been described as looking something like a rotating lawn sprinkler.

P/2013 P5 was first spotted with the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope at the top of Haleakala volcano in Maui, Hawaii, in August and then followed up with more detailed observations using the Hubble Space Telescope.

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The Two-Way
1:06 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Obama's Surveillance Review Panel Issues Initial Findings

Former chief counterterrorism adviser Richard Clarke is a lead member of a panel appointed by the president to review the country's surveillance policies.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 2:34 pm

A team appointed by President Obama to review U.S. spying policies in the wake of the Edward Snowden revelations about National Security Agency programs has delivered an interim report to the White House.

National Security Council spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden said in an email to news organizations that the review group "has orally provided their interim report to the White House, with their final report due by Dec. 15." She said the results would be made public "in some way" once the finished review is submitted.

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The Two-Way
11:33 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Judge: MF Global Customers To Recover All Their Losses

Jon Corzine, former New Jersey governor and ex-CEO of MF Global, leaves a congressional hearing in 2011.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 5:35 pm

One thread runs through nearly every story of financial fraud, from Enron to Madoff: Investors bilked out of their money rarely get it back.

So, this lead from The New York Times Dealbook blog caught our attention:

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