Renée Peck

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With the arrival of Lent, we’re all scaling down our appetites. No more sloth, lust or gluttony. After all, less is more. And good things, they say, come in small packages.

But when it comes to food? In New Orleans? I’m not so sure.

The small-plate trend seems to be, well, mushrooming. Baru, Booty's, Dominica, Salu, Three Muses — the list goes on and on. Even the owners of Finn McCool's, that Irish bastion of barbecue and beer, are jumping on the tasting bandwagon with the new Trèo on Tulane Avenue.

National Archives

The French Market may seem like one big urban flea market — with everything from tee-shirts to Mardi Gras masks, alligator heads to shot glasses. And tourists… lots of tourists. But upon closer inspection, you discover that this outdoor shopping plaza is full of individuals who couldn’t be more different from one another.

NolaVie's Laine Kaplan-Levenson and Renée Peck met some of these local vendors who make the French Market another unique corner of the city.

Fotophilius / Flickr

Now that the Super Bowl is over, we can turn our attention to the next colossal event on the sports horizon. I know I’m ready. 

Yes, the Winter Olympics start this week. Of course, for those of us here in New Orleans, the whole Winter Olympic thing is a little hard to get into. Mountains? Snow?

The Civic Theater

Welcome to 2014. While you’ve been making and breaking resolutions, I’ve been scouring the in and out lists to find out what’s hot and what’s not in New Orleans for the new year. I don’t know about you, but I don’t want to be caught wearing a mini instead of a midi, or high-top boots instead of wedgy sneakers. So 2013.

So let me share with you a few trending topics in areas important to New Orleanians. Like, well, drinking.

flickr/Alexander van Dijk

It’s that time of year again — when the pundits look back over the year just past and announce the most significant events.

While “Year in Review” headlines certainly have their place in history, Nolavie’s Renée Peck finds that looking back at the most insignificant stories of 2013 is a lot more fun.

Voices from the Classroom, a series presented by NolaVie and WWNO, explores local education through conversations with those on the front lines: the teachers.

While superintendents, experts, parents, politicians and pundits have weighed in extensively on what's right and wrong with the educational system in Louisiana, it's the people behind the desks who must deal, day in and day out, with students, evaluations, testing, behavior, curriculum and, ultimately, what works and what does not.

Kyle Walther

Voices from the Classroom, a series presented by NolaVie and WWNO, explores local education through conversations with those on the front lines: the teachers.

While superintendents, experts, parents, politicians and pundits have weighed in extensively on what's right and wrong with the educational system in Louisiana, it's the people behind the desks who must deal, day in and day out, with students, evaluations, testing, behavior, curriculum and, ultimately, what works and what does not.

Philip Razem

Voices from the Classroom, a series presented by NolaVie and WWNO, explores local education through conversations with those on the front lines: the teachers.

While superintendents, experts, parents, politicians and pundits have weighed in extensively on what's right and wrong with the educational system in Louisiana, it's the people behind the desks who must deal, day in and day out, with students, evaluations, testing, behavior, curriculum and, ultimately, what works and what does not.

Jason Kruppa / NolaVie

Who: Don Frampton has been senior pastor of St. Charles Avenue Presbyterian Church for the past 19 years. After Hurricane Katrina, his church created Rebuilding Hope in New Orleans (RHINO), which has brought more than 6,000 volunteers to New Orleans and built 29 homes through Habitat for Humanity.

In his own words, here's what Don has to say about:

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