Renée Peck

Renee Peck, editor of NolaVie, worked for 32 years as a feature editor and writer at The Times-Picayune, earning Associated Press and Press Club of New Orleans awards along the way. She helped launch the first Times-Picayune website in the 1990s, when the Internet was in its infancy. Among her past titles are Food Editor, Entertainment Editor, TV Editor, Assistant Living Editor, and Home and Garden Editor. Her This Mold House column chronicled with humor and inexpertise her rebuilding efforts post-Katrina. Her Big Easy Living column for NolaVie explores the way we live in this always entertaining but sometimes uneasy city. Email her at Renee@nolavie.com.

Ways to Connect

The Collins C. Diboll Vieux Carré Digital Survey / The Historic New Orleans Collection

In celebration of the city’s Tricentennial, NolaVie and New Orleans Historical bring you the series Who Did it Better: New Orleans Then and Now. In it, we look at aspects of the city’s history and their parallels in the present. Today we go to the city’s literary history, in a segment we’ll call Wags and Words.

New Orleans Museum of Art

There are more reasons than ever to go to the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden in City Park. You can wander its shady paths, contemplate its 64 sculptures, and cross over its quiet lagoon, where hundreds of Louisiana irises will burst into bloom come springtime. But that’s not all that’s blossoming at the Sculpture Garden. 

Prospect.4

Prospect 4 is a contemporary art triennial, taking place now through February 25 at 17 venues across New Orleans. Its theme is “The Lotus In Spite of the Swamp," and the idea is to offer artworks that ponder the connection between New Orleans and the world. NolaVie's Renée Peck sat down with artist Satch Hoyt to hear about his work, which is on display at the Old US Mint.

Library of Congress

In celebration of the city’s Tricentennial, NolaVie and New Orleans Historical bring you the series Who Did it Better: New Orleans Then and Now. In it, we look at aspects of the city’s history and their parallels in the present. Today we go to The Battle of New Orleans, in a segment we call Pirates and Nuns.

New Orleans City Park

Editor's Note: In celebration of the city’s upcoming Tricentennial, NolaVie and New Orleans Historical bring you the series Who Did it Better: New Orleans Then and Now. In it, we look at offbeat aspects of the city’s history and their parallels in the present. Today we go to City Park, in a segment we call A Walk in the Park.

Infrogmation of New Orleans / Flickr

New Orleans has a great new tool for music lovers. A Closer Walk is an interactive, location-based website about New Orleans music history. Just tap the map and you can find songs, rare photos, stories by local writers, and much more. One of the project’s founders, author Randy Fertel, speaks with NolaVie’s Renée Peck to share more about A Closer Walk.

Visit ViaNolaVie for a related article written by Renée Peck.

The Mascot

In celebration of the city’s upcoming Tricentennial, NolaVie and New Orleans Historical bring you the series Who Did it Better? New Orleans Then and Now. In it, we look at offbeat aspects of the city’s history and their parallels in the present. Today we give you: Big Easy Bikes. Call it a story about recycling.

The Midlo Center for New Orleans Studies

New Orleans is a city of stories, stories that weave a collective tapestry of a rich and colorful past. Students in the history department at UNO have been spinning these threads into a collection of app-based tours called New Orleans Historical. NolaVie's Renee Peck speaks with historian Molly Mitchell to learn more.  

New Harmony High School

Some innovative educators in New Orleans are rethinking high school. When New Harmony High opens next year, it won’t look – or act -- like a conventional school. That’s because it will most likely be situated on a barge on the Mississippi River. And its curriculum will include some unique lessons about coastal land loss. NolaVie's Renee Peck sits down with Sunny Dawn Summers, New Harmony's Head of School, to hear about this distinctive project.

Blake Bertucelli

Salads used to just be a side, or even an afterthought to the meal. These days, they’ve taken center stage as entrees, often with complex combinations and ingredients. French native and New Orleans transplant Jean-Mark Sens is an authority on leafy greens, and NolaVie’s Renée Peck speaks with him about the once lowly salad and its cultural evolution.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Renée Peck.

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