Rachel Martin

Rachel Martin is the host of Weekend Edition Sunday.

Prior to moving into the host position in the fall of 2012, Martin started as National Security Correspondent for NPR in May 2010. In that position she covered both defense and intelligence issues. She traveled regularly to Iraq and Afghanistan with the Secretary of Defense, reporting on the US wars and the effectiveness of the Pentagon's counterinsurgency strategy. Martin also reported extensively on the changing demographic of the US military – from the debate over whether to allow women to fight in combat units – to the repeal of Don't Ask Don't Tell. Her reporting on how the military is changing also took her to a US Air Force base in New Mexico where the military for a rare look at how the military trains drone pilots.

Martin was part of the team that launched NPR's experimental morning news show, The Bryant Park Project, based in New York — a two-hour daily multimedia program that she co-hosted with Alison Stewart and Mike Pesca.

In 2006-2007, Martin served as NPR's religion correspondent. Her piece on Islam in America was awarded "Best Radio Feature" by the Religion News Writers Association in 2007. As one of NPR's reporters assigned to cover the Virginia Tech massacre that same year, she was on the school's campus within hours of the shooting and on the ground in Blacksburg, Va., covering the investigation and emotional aftermath in the following days.

Based in Berlin, Germany, Martin worked as a NPR foreign correspondent from 2005-2006. During her time in Europe, she covered the London terrorist attacks, the federal elections in Germany, the 2006 World Cup and issues surrounding immigration and shifting cultural identities in Europe.

Her foreign reporting experience extends beyond Europe. Martin has also worked extensively in Afghanistan. She began reporting from there as a freelancer during the summer of 2003, covering the reconstruction effort in the wake of the U.S. invasion. In fall 2004, Martin returned for several months to cover Afghanistan's first democratic presidential election. She has reported widely on women's issues in Afghanistan, the fledgling political and governance system and the US-NATO fight against the insurgency. She has also reported from Iraq, where she covered U.S. military operations and the strategic alliance between Sunni sheiks and the U.S. military in Anbar province.

Martin started her career at public radio station KQED in San Francisco, as a producer and reporter.

She holds an undergraduate degree in political science from the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington, and a Master's degree in International Affairs from Columbia University.

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Music Interviews
5:37 pm
Thu December 13, 2012

A Few Questions For One Direction

Formed in 2010, One Direction are one of the biggest pop acts in the world. Left to right: Niall Horan, Louis Tomlinson, Harry Styles, Liam Payne, Zayn Malik.
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Sun December 9, 2012 2:33 pm

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Author Interviews
3:50 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Old Newspapers, New Perspectives On The American Revolution

Courtesy of Sourcebooks

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 6:33 am

Time has a way of condensing major historical events into a few key moments, with one-dimensional, legendary figures at the forefront. In his new book, author and archivist Todd Andrlik gives life and depth to one such event — the American Revolution. He uses newspaper reporting from that era to provide a sense of the Revolution as it actually unfolded.

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Music Interviews
3:48 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Alicia Keys: How A 'Girl On Fire' Keeps From Burning Out

Alicia Keys' latest album is called Girl on Fire.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun November 25, 2012 5:28 pm

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Food
12:41 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

The Veggieducken: A Meatless Dish With Gravitas

The Sporkful

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 10:45 am

Vegetarians don't need your sympathy on Thanksgiving, says Dan Pashman, host of a food podcast and blog called The Sporkful. Pashman is an omnivore, but he spoke to vegetarians and found "it actually makes them feel uncomfortable when a host goes to extreme lengths to make something special just for them."

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Music Interviews
12:40 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Willie Nelson: Road Rules And Deep Thoughts

Willie Nelson has recorded more than 100 albums and was given a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000.
David McClister Courtesy of William Morrow

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 6:04 am

At nearly 80, Willie Nelson remains impressively prolific: lots of songs, lots of kids and, fittingly, lots of autobiographies. The country singer's latest memoir is called Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die, after a song on his Heroes album, released earlier this year. Nelson says those seeking earth-shattering revelations about his life should look elsewhere; that wasn't his intention in writing the book.

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Author Interviews
12:39 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

A Book To Break The Gun Control Stalemate

Joshua Lott Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 19, 2012 9:25 am

Americans own an estimated 300 million guns. It's a level of gun ownership that no other country in the world comes close to matching. It's also a source of controversy in the U.S., where groups on both sides of the issue seem to have dug deep into the debate.

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Food
12:39 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

Put A Little Soul In That Thanksgiving Stuffing

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 2:48 pm

Thanksgiving has its must-haves: potatoes, cranberries, turkey. But cooking the feast with a soul-food style gives the meal a whole new flavor.

Soul food conjures up thoughts of rich dishes full of butter or gravy — comfort foods. But soul food comes out of one of America's darkest chapters. Chef Melba Wilson, owner of Melba's Restaurant and Melba's 125 in Harlem, N.Y., explains that the basis of the cooking comes from the food slave owners gave to slaves.

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Politics
4:10 am
Sun November 18, 2012

'It Takes Generations': Sen. Boxer On The Gender Gap

California Sen. Barbara Boxer says women are still making progress on closing the gender gap in Congress.
Ben Margot AP

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 2:29 pm

Sen. Barbara Boxer says we can finally stop using the term "Year of the Woman" once the Senate reaches a 50-50 split of men and women. "That's the goal," she says.

We're not quite there yet. But in 2013, more women will be serving in Congress than ever before. There will be 20 women in the Senate. When Boxer took her seat in 1993, there were six — and that was after tripling from two the term before.

So what does the California Democrat have to say about the fact that there's still a gender gap? Let's put this in perspective.

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Author Interviews
11:42 am
Mon November 12, 2012

Philip Pullman Rewrites The Brothers Grimm

Courtesy of Viking

Originally published on Tue November 20, 2012 11:02 am

Two hundred years after the Brothers Grimm first published Children's and Household Tales, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm are getting another rewrite.

Philip Pullman, who wrote The Golden Compass of the young-adult fantasy series His Dark Materials, took on the challenge of retelling 50 of the original Grimm stories for his latest book, Fairy Tales from the Brothers Grimm.

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Sports
5:39 am
Sun November 11, 2012

The Moneyball Of Basketball

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 11:36 am

With baseball playoffs becoming a distant memory, NPR's Mike Pesca talks to host Rachel Martin about basketball becoming more like baseball. People are increasingly trying to identify more valuable statistics for individual basketball players.

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