Peter Ricchiuti

Executive Council / Host of Out to Lunch

Peter Ricchiuti is the finance professor you wish you had back in college! He is the Assistant Dean at Tulane University's A.B. Freeman School of Business, and his insight and humor have twice made him the School's top professor. After a successful career on Wall Street, Ricchiuti served for five years as Assistant State Treasurer and Chief Investment Officer for the State of Louisiana. There he skillfully managed the State's $3 billion investment portfolio.

In 1993, Ricchiuti founded the Burkenroad Reports investment research program, where he leads a team of more than 160 business students in search of the investment "skinny" on undervalued stocks in six southern states. Ricchiuti and the Burkenroad Reports have been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Investor’s Business Daily, The Washington Post, CNN and CNBC.

Ricchiuti is a frequent contributor in financial and business media, including Marketplace, the nationally broadcast public radio program. He is a popular speaker at meetings and conferences throughout the United States and in Europe. His unique presentation style puts him in front of a wide variety of audiences, including his selection by the NFL to teach investment workshops to the New Orleans Saints.

  Everybody knows right from wrong. Everybody knows numbers don’t lie. And nobody wants to spend time in prison. Why, then, would a person lie about corporate profits knowing there’s a high probability they’re going to get caught and end up behind bars?

Peter's guest on Out to Lunch wrote the book on business ethics, and it’s not theoretical.

Stephen Watson, Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of the National World War II Museum.
Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

In New Orleans we often take pains to point out what makes us different from other places. It’s pretty common to hear comments like, “We’re not like the rest of the country,” and “We’re not like the rest of the South.”

So it’s ironic that two of New Orleans’ newest icons are representative of the South, and the rest of the country. And they’re just a few blocks away from each other: The National World War II Museum and The Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

 In New Orleans we often take pains to point out what makes us different from other places. It’s pretty common to hear comments like, “We’re not like the rest of the country” and “We’re not like the rest of the South.”

So it’s ironic that two of New Orleans’ newest icons are representative of The South, and the rest of the country. And they’re just a few blocks away from each other: The National World War II Museum and The Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

Matt Schwarz, Linda Pompa and Peter Ricchiuti.
It's New Orleans

When people talk about which parts of New Orleans are desirable, you often hear the phrase, "block by block." Meaning, in blighted parts of town there are bright spots. And in the nicer parts of town there are areas that are not so great.

Two parts of town that have been commercially block by block are the mostly empty lots around Loyola Avenue near the Superdome, and the largely abandoned Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard.

Today, that’s all changing.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

No matter which era of recent U.S. history we look back on, we seem to be constantly working on two issues: healthcare and education.

The debate at the center of these discussions is often financial. Where is Federal or state money for reform going to come from? And if reform is privately funded, how are these fundamental requirements distributed equally?

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

Whatever era of boom or bust we’re in, it seems we never stop working on healthcare, or on education.

Locally, in education, New Orleans is the only city in the United States where 100 percent of our public schools are charter schools. What started out as a post-Katrina experiment has become a nationwide trend setting model. The Executive Director of the Louisiana Association of Public Charter Schools, Caroline Roemer Shirley, explains the revolutionary new business model to Peter Ricchiuti on this episode of Out to Lunch.

Dennis Brady and Peter Ricchiuti.
Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

A lot of tourists who come to New Orleans go home and describe the city as an oasis of European-looking streets lined with music clubs where people wander around drinking cocktails and eating beignets 24 hours a day. This fabulous wonderland is the same 13 riverside blocks that locals describe as dirty, smelly, crime-ridden, home to gutter punks, T-shirt shops, and over-priced restaurants they wouldn’t go to even if they could find a parking place.

Peter Ricchiuti and Lauren Rudzis.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

If you live in New Orleans, you're a part of the music business. Even if you never go to Jazz Fest or Bourbon Street, the revenue generated by music makes up a chunk of our local economy.

We're also tied into the empire of the world heavyweight champion of live music, Live Nation, through the local offices of Live Nation Festivals North America.

Patti Dunn and Peter Ricchiuti.
It's New Orleans

Every time a new mobile device comes out we can put more stuff on it. These days we don’t need to carry a calendar, phone book, yellow pad, book, map, magazine, music player, camera, DVD player, laptop, or even a heart monitor. So what, exactly, are we putting in these bags and backpacks we all lug around? Somebody who knows the answer to that is Patti Dunn.

Patti's New Orleans company, Tchoup Industries, makes bags and back packs.

Chet Overall / It's New Orleans

Every time a new mobile device comes out we can put more stuff on it. These days we don't need to carry a calendar, phone book, yellow pad, book, map, magazine, music player, camera, DVD player, laptop, or even a heart monitor.

  So what, exactly, are we putting in these bags and backpacks we all lug around? Somebody who knows the answer to that is Patti Dunn. Patti's New Orleans company, Tchoup Industries, makes bags and backpacks.

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