Peter Ricchiuti

Host of Out to Lunch / Executive Council

Peter Ricchiuti is the finance professor you wish you had back in college! He is the Assistant Dean at Tulane University's A.B. Freeman School of Business, and his insight and humor have twice made him the School's top professor. After a successful career on Wall Street, Ricchiuti served for five years as Assistant State Treasurer and Chief Investment Officer for the State of Louisiana. There he skillfully managed the State's $3 billion investment portfolio.

In 1993, Ricchiuti founded the Burkenroad Reports investment research program, where he leads a team of more than 160 business students in search of the investment "skinny" on undervalued stocks in six southern states. Ricchiuti and the Burkenroad Reports have been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Investor’s Business Daily, The Washington Post, CNN and CNBC.

Ricchiuti is a frequent contributor in financial and business media, including Marketplace, the nationally broadcast public radio program. He is a popular speaker at meetings and conferences throughout the United States and in Europe. His unique presentation style puts him in front of a wide variety of audiences, including his selection by the NFL to teach investment workshops to the New Orleans Saints.

Grant Morris / It's New Orleans

Everybody knows right from wrong. Everybody knows numbers don't lie. Nobody wants to spend time in prison. Why, then, would a person lie about corporate profits, knowing there's a high probability they're going to get caught and end up behind bars?

Peter's guest on Out to Lunch wrote the book on business ethics, and it's not theoretical. Aaron Beam went to federal prison for his part in a multi-billion dollar fraud, and now teaches others how to make better decisions.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

When we get up and go to work each day, most of us assume that everyone else going to work is a decent person like ourselves. Even if we have competitors, our basic assumption is that they’re okay people — after all, they’re doing the same thing we are.

That’s not what going to work is like for Peter's guests on today’s Out to Lunch. For both of them, their daily occupation is all about bad or misguided people.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

When it comes to business, we all agree on one thing: we all want to succeed. Typically we measure success numerically — the more profit we make, the better we're doing. Sure, we'd all like to make billions, but the reality is most of us are not going to turn our businesses into Facebook or Apple. For many people in business, just keeping the doors open and the lights on is succeeding.

Peter Ricchiuti's guests on Out to Lunch take whatever your definition of success is — whether it's making a fortune or just making it 'till Friday — and help you get there.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

Everybody likes to think they're important, but here in Louisiana we really are. Two sectors of our local economy are major components of the national, and global, economy: oil and gas, and renewable energy.

Outside of the oil companies who physically drill for oil, there is a huge industry of companies who do everything else — from building oil rigs to delivering groceries to the men and women who work on them.

One of the biggest offshore support companies in the world is headquartered here in New Orleans. Tidewater.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

New Orleans is a beautiful city. But very little of that beauty is natural. Even our magnificent parks and tree lined avenues are planned and planted. Mostly, when we talk about the beauty of New Orleans, we're talking about buildings.

Almost every commercial building has some sort of artwork on it. We don't typically refer to it as "art" — we more often call it a "sign" — and many commercial buildings have branding artwork inside too. Peter Ricchiuti's guests on Out to Lunch are responsible for some of the city's notable pieces of graphic art.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

Back in the 20th Century, when you wanted to fly somewhere you had two choices: you could call the airline and buy a ticket, or you could call a travel agent, who for some magical reason could get you the same ticket for less money.

Then along came the online travel site revolution. Now, instead of making a two minute phone call, we can spend hours, even days, comparing prices and airline schedules before buying a plane ticket.

Grant Morris / It's New Orleans

Now that the Katrina-darkened footlights are back on at the Saenger, the Mahalia Jackson and the Civic, theater is big business in New Orleans.

Peter's guests on Out to Lunch are two of the people who brought these theaters back to life and who operate them. Bryan Bailey is co-owner and Managing Partner of the Civic Theater. David Skinner is General Manager of the Saenger and the Mahalia Jackson theaters.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

There are a number of New Orleans businesses that are as much a part of the unique vocabulary of New Orleanians as "muffuletta" and "poboy." Some of them — like K&B and Schwegmans  — are in the "aint dere no more" category. One New Orleans institution that is still here is what we call either "Oxner" or "Oshner." However you say it, everybody in New Orleans knows what you mean. Its real title is Ochsner Health System.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

If you live in New Orleans you're familiar with this scenario: You're having a perfectly normal day when suddenly you groan, "Oh noooo." You're not watching the Saints' defense — it's that other sinking feeling you get as a New Orleanian: when the power goes off.

On this week's Out to Lunch Peter takes a look at the other 364 days, 23 hours in the life of New Orleans' Fortune 500 company, Entergy, with Mark Kleehammer, Entergy's Vice President of Business Development Services.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

Whatever era of boom or bust we’re in, it seems we never stop working on healthcare, or on education.

Locally, in education, New Orleans is the only city in the United States where 100 percent of our public schools are charter schools. What started out as a post-Katrina experiment has become a nationwide trend setting model. The Executive Director of the Louisiana Association of Public Charter Schools, Caroline Roemer Shirley, explains the revolutionary new business model to Peter Ricchiuti on this episode of Out to Lunch.

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