Peter Ricchiuti

Executive Council / Host of Out to Lunch

Peter Ricchiuti is the finance professor you wish you had back in college! He is the Assistant Dean at Tulane University's A.B. Freeman School of Business, and his insight and humor have twice made him the School's top professor. After a successful career on Wall Street, Ricchiuti served for five years as Assistant State Treasurer and Chief Investment Officer for the State of Louisiana. There he skillfully managed the State's $3 billion investment portfolio.

In 1993, Ricchiuti founded the Burkenroad Reports investment research program, where he leads a team of more than 160 business students in search of the investment "skinny" on undervalued stocks in six southern states. Ricchiuti and the Burkenroad Reports have been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Investor’s Business Daily, The Washington Post, CNN and CNBC.

Ricchiuti is a frequent contributor in financial and business media, including Marketplace, the nationally broadcast public radio program. He is a popular speaker at meetings and conferences throughout the United States and in Europe. His unique presentation style puts him in front of a wide variety of audiences, including his selection by the NFL to teach investment workshops to the New Orleans Saints.

Peter Ricchiuti and William Andrews, Director of the Ogden Museum of Southern Art.
Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

In New Orleans we often take pains to point out what makes us different from other places. It’s pretty common to hear comments like, “We’re not like the rest of the country” and “We’re not like the rest of the South.”

So it’s ironic that two of New Orleans’ newest icons are representative of The South, and the rest of the country. And they’re just a few blocks away from each other: The World War II Museum and The Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

Did you know that more people are scared of public speaking than are scared of heights or spiders? And that, when asked, people rank fear of public speaking as even greater than fear of commitment? Think about that. Many of us are more scared of standing up in front of strangers for 5 minutes than committing to a relationship for a lifetime.

Trey Fayard.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

There are places in the world nobody wants to be. Jail. Hospital. And stuck in an airport, which can feel like a combination of the previous two.

Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

We’ve seen major sectors of the US economy change over the last few years. Retail and energy have both been shaken up. But probably nothing has gotten more people shaken up than changes in healthcare.

Peter's guests on this edition of Out to Lunch are shaking up healthcare in New Orleans.

Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

Today on Out to Lunch Peter is talking with two business people who are taking old fashioned taste and recycling it for a new market. Their businesses couldn’t be more different. But their reinvention of products based on a more innocent past are strangely similar.

French Quarter Festival Executive Director Marci Schramm.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

When we talk about big events in New Orleans we typically say “Mardi Gras and Jazz Fest.”

Economically, though, if we’re going to bracket two events, we should say “Mardi Gras and French Quarter Festival.” French Quarter Festival’s economic impact on the city has become massive. It’s reportedly bigger than Jazz Fest.

Ashlee Arcenaux Jones and Peter Ricchiuti.
Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

If you’ve been shopping lately you might have noticed the growing number of stores that have creative chalkboard signs outside on the sidewalk. You might have also noticed similar creative chalkboard menus in restaurants.

There’s a good chance those groovy looking hand lettered chalkboard signs were made by a company called SmallChalk, the brainchild of Ashlee Arcenaux Jones.

Out To Lunch: Good News And Bad News
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

We've all seen this guy or woman on TV, and we've all said, "Thank God that's not me." The person sweating behind a bank of microphones, trying to explain away something bad. What if one day, maybe through no fault of your own, that person is you? Having to explain why things aren't quite how they look. How do you know what to do? What to say? You could call on crisis management PR specialist, John Deveney.

Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

Wherever you go in the world you find human beings have two things in common. We all like to eat. And we all like to incorporate into our living spaces non functional objects we call art.

In many countries we’ve institutionalized these traits. We dine in restaurants and we hang art in galleries. In New Orleans, as usual, we’ve gone our own way. We’ve turned dining into an art form. And our artists are increasingly hanging their works in their own spaces.

Peter's guests on Out to Lunch today represent both strands of this movement.

It's New Orleans

Property values are going up in New Orleans. Parts of the city that buyers have been avoiding for years are now desirable addresses. But by the time you spend your life savings on a house you don’t have a lot left over to do much else. Like pay movers to move your stuff in. You could do it yourself. Or you could hire Tim Colglazier to move all your stuff — on his bike.

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