Laine Kaplan-Levenson

Producer

Laine Kaplan-Levenson is a multimedia producer living in New Orleans. Laine was the first Coastal Producer for WWNO's Coastal Desk, and is now the host and producer of TriPod: New Orleans at 300, WWNO's Tricentennial series. She also runs a live storytelling series called Bring Your Own. Previously, Laine was the transmedia producer for the interactive documentary project LandofOpportunity, and the managing editor for Nolavie.com. Her work has appeared on MarketplaceHere and Now, the podcast GravyNPRTakePart.com, and more. 

Ways to Connect

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

It's been five years since the 2010 BP oil spill. On the day of the actual anniversary, a march and rally took place in the Central Business District to commemorate the people and places impacted by the spill. Marchers went from Lafayette Square to Jackson Square, dressed in all black to represent the 210 million gallons of oil that spilled into the Gulf of Mexico.

Bart Everson / Wikimedia Commons

There have been flash flood warnings for Southeast Louisiana this week. And while areas around town flood, the city of New Orleans is poised to pass a new zoning ordinance that will help with some of that water. But not all of it. 

Between 2-4 inches of rain are expected to fall over the next few days, and that makes it hard to do some basic things. Like get in your car.   

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

Monday, April 20 marks the fifth anniversary of the 2010 BP oil spill that sent millions of gallons of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

Right after the spill, seafood restaurants were bombarded with concerns about the safety of what was being served, and where it came from. Today, the public has stopped asking questions and is ready to eat, but now there’s a supply issue. While marketing campaigns are spreading a message of safe and bountiful Gulf seafood, others in the industry worry about the future.

Gulf Restoration Network

American Rivers came out with its 2015 list of top 10 most endangered rivers. The Pearl River that runs through Louisiana and Mississippi is included on this national list.

Each of the ten rivers are called "endangered" because they face some kind of big change on the horizon. In the case of Pearl River, it’s whether a new dam will be built in Jackson, Mississippi.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Last Sunday, longtime sound engineer Bill Deputy died of lung cancer at the age of 58. Deputy served as All Things Considered’s technical director for many years, and traveled all over the world capturing sound, including the first Mardi Gras after Hurricane Katrina in 2006.

Emily Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

Last weekend, Spring Break vibes descended upon the riverfront in the form of neon, midriffs and pounding bass. The BUKU Music and Art Project swarmed Mardi Gras World with big names like STS9, TV On the Radio, and A$AP Rocky, and more underground acts like Run the Jewels and Odesza, for a mostly collegiate (and younger) crowd to rejoice in. 

Listening Coast

Earlier this month, the Wetlands Youth Summit took place at the South Louisiana Wetlands Discovery Center in Houma, Louisiana. High school students interested in the challenges gulf coast communities are facing came together to learn from each other, and talk solutions.

The #ListeningCoast teamed up with the summit to see what these teenagers are most concerned with, and whether or not they see themselves living on the coast later on down the road.

Here’s what people wrote in via text:

NASA / Wikimedia Commons

The Disaster Resilience Leadership Academy at Tulane University received $1.4 million from the BP Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative to fund research about impacts of the 2010 oil spill in Louisiana and Alabama. 

This three year program will focus on three coastal communities. Two areas in Louisiana and one in Alabama will be selected to study the impact of the oil spill.

Listening Coast / WWNO

WWNO’s Listening Post community media project has mostly covered issues related to New Orleans. But WWNO’s signal reaches far beyond the city, and we want to explore what people along the Louisiana coast are thinking.

Naturally, our expansion is called the Listening Coast, and it has its own number: Text "hello" to 985-200-2433 (or call and leave a voicemail!) to get in touch.

Serguei S. Dukachev / Wikimedia Commons

A report published last month found that an unusually high number of bottlenose dolphins have been dying all along the Gulf Coast since February 2010. This unusual mortality event, or UME, began two months before the 2010 BP oil spill, but groups including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say the spill is responsible for the continued die-off of this species.

Pages