Laine Kaplan-Levenson

Producer

Laine Kaplan-Levenson is a multimedia producer living in New Orleans. She was the transmedia producer for the interactive documentary project LandofOpportunity, and later the managing editor for Nolavie.com Laine is now a station producer at WWNO, producer for the Listening Post, the Moth Storyslam, and runs her own live storytelling event, Bring Your Own.

Ways To Connect

RADiUS-TWC

"The Great Invisible" is a new documentary about the 2010 BP Oil Spill opening on December 12 at the Prytania Theater. Margaret Brown, the movie's director, grew up on the Alabama coast and saw the impact the spill had on her family and neighbors.

But, as Brown continued to pay attention, she realized this was not just a story about the victims, and that the oil executives were not the only enemies.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

There’s a new push to get tourists in New Orleans off Bourbon Street and into nature. Eco-tourism is the new way to explore Louisiana, according to a new statewide campaign. And as commercial fishermen are seeing numbers drop in catch and profit, they’re considering the tourism industry as a way to make a living.  

PO3 Patrick Kelley / US DOD

The Governor’s Advisory Commission met Wednesday to receive an update on the RESTORE Act from Chris Barnes, a legal advisor from the governor’s office.

Barnes reminded the group that of the three pots of money going to the five gulf coast states, only one is tied to impact from the oil spill.

Those funds will be distributed to the gulf coast states based on a formula established by the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council.

Stephen Luna / Wikimedia Commons

The University of New Orleans hosted the Governor’s Advisory Commission on Coastal Protection, Restoration and Conservation on Wednesday. They met to discuss the RESTORE Act and receive an update about an LSU study on how land loss will impact the economy of Louisiana’s coast.

King Milling is chairman of the Governor’s Advisory Commission. He posed the question that everyone is thinking about, but no one wants to ask:

Infrogmation / Wikimedia Commons

WHAT: The Landscape Architect

A landscape architect is trained to design everything outside of a building — where pedestrians flow, where plants grow, seating, parks, playgrounds, sports fields, etc. Everything outside of the building is "landscape." This work includes the manipulation of spaces like grading and terrain modeling. The idea is to create outdoor spaces for people to use.

HOW it relates to green stormwater management and infrastructure:

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

On Tuesday, November 18, environmental reporter Bob Marshall of The Lens sat down with Gladstone Jones, the lead attorney in the lawsuit against oil and gas companies for coastal damages.

Gladstone Jones signed his contract with the levee board based on a sliding scale. The 16 lawyers on the levee board’s legal team will be paid between 22-32 percent, depending on the amount recovered.

Thanks to a quirk of history — and a love of bananas — New Orleans has had a Honduran population for more than a century. But that population exploded after Hurricane Katrina, when the jobs needed to rebuild the city drew waves of Honduran immigrants. Many of them stayed, and nearly a decade later, they've established a thriving — if somewhat underground — culinary community.

Signs of that community abound, if you know where to look.

Arpingstone / Wikimedia Commons

Over the weekend, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries launched its new Get Out and Fish! program in Lafayette’s Girard Park. A fishing competition and other family friendly activities all served to celebrate a new initiative to increase the number of people with access to quality fishing.

They say video killed the radio star. Mike Wood of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries says video games killed the fisherman.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The French Embassy in the United States and Tulane University came together earlier this week to present the French American Climate Talks, or FACTS. The conference series travels to cities in the United States and Canada to engage scientists and policymakers in discussions about the impacts of climate change, and how we can prepare to face them.

Lane Lefort / U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack was in Norco, Louisiana on Monday to announce a new environmental initiative aimed at private landowners along the Gulf Coast.

The Department of Agriculture and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation are looking to fund conservation projects as part of the ongoing recovery from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

Pages