Laine Kaplan-Levenson


Laine Kaplan-Levenson is a multimedia producer living in New Orleans. She was the transmedia producer for the interactive documentary project LandofOpportunity, and later the managing editor for Laine was the first Coastal Producer for WWNO's Coastal Desk, and is now the host of TriPod: New Orleans at 300, WWNO's Tricentennial series. Laine's also a producer for the Listening Post, the Moth Storyslam, and runs her own live storytelling event, Bring Your Own. Her work has appeared on MarketplaceHere and Now, the podcast, and more. 

Ways to Connect

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Services / Wikimedia Commons

As we explore the Gulf Coast more comprehensively than ever before, trying to understand better the complex relationships inherent in the restoration process, there's a lot to learn and keep track of.

In order to both understand and talk about coastal erosion, an expanded vocabulary is needed — one filled with brand-new terms whose definitions are integral to absorbing the problems and solutions Louisiana faces around water and land loss.

New Orleans Parents Guide /

WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast and reports back on the community's response. This week the Listening Post explores School Choice and the school application process. 

Applications to New Orleans public and charter schools are due this month. Under the school choice model kids aren’t assigned to the school in their neighborhood. They apply to schools across the city,  and a computer system places them.

David Crabb /

The Moth StorySLAM takes place each month at Café Istanbul, where ten brave souls volunteer themselves to tell a true story in front on a live audience.

On Thursday, January 29 at the Joy Theatre, the winners of those StorySLAMs are going head-to-head at the Moth GrandSLAM. Comedian David Crabb is the special guest host of the evening, and WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down to find out why he loves telling stories and hosting Moth events.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A New Orleans organization is trying to help fund coastal restoration by quantifying Louisiana wetlands, using hard numbers as a way to offset global carbon emissions.

Companies that send lots of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere — such as power plants and oil refineries — need to offset some of that pollution. So they invest in green carbon projects by spending money on things like protecting forests. One Louisiana company wants to expand that tactic to the Gulf Coast.

shannonpatrick17 / Wikimedia Commons

Activists are gathering on Freret Street Tuesday night as part of a national day of action against the creation of the Keystone XL pipeline. 350 Louisiana, the Sierra Club, the Louisiana Bucket Brigade and other groups are coming together to ask President Obama to keep his promise to veto the pipeline.

The event is called a "projector action." Organizers will project images of Keystone and its consequences against the sides of buildings on Freret and Cadiz streets starting at 7:30 p.m.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

Jesse Hardman is the Coastal Reporter and Laine Kaplan-Levenson is the Coastal Producer for WWNO’s Coastal Desk. The desk launched in June, and with the end of 2014 the team curated a recap of coverage thus far.

Listen to the Coastal Team talk with WWNO News Director Eve Troeh:

Starting Out:

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The non-profit Public Lab is an environmental organization for the DIY community. They help people monitor the health of their natural spaces with low cost kits and materials. The organization launched after the 2010 BP oil spill with the goal of  making information available to the public about that disaster. 

As the 5th anniversary of the spill approaches, Public Lab is unveiling some new techniques for getting communities to document environmental issues.

Coastal experts met on Louisiana’s Avery Island yesterday to discuss the potential of private investment money to help restore and sustain the Gulf Coast. 

The meeting included representatives of federal and state agencies, universities, investment banking institutions, and non-profits.

The focus was a new report from America's WETLAND Foundation.

That organization is advocating the creation of an ecological marketplace for private investors looking to finance environmental projects.

Serge Ottaviani / Wikimedia Commons

Coastal experts met on Louisiana’s Avery Island to discuss the potential of private investment money to help restore and sustain the Gulf Coast. 

glynn424 /

The Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority, the state agency charged with implementing and maintaining Louisiana’s Coastal Master Plan, is applying for funding for five major restoration projects. The projects include creation of marshes adjacent to the Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans East, Lake Maurepas and Biloxi, and money for consolidated management of the Mississippi River.