Laine Kaplan-Levenson

Producer

Laine Kaplan-Levenson is a multi-media producer living in New Orleans. She began her career in New Orleans as an Assistant Design Producer for the production company Rehage Entertainment, and went on to work with the local online news and culture publication NOLADefender, where she served as Assistant Publisher for two years. Then, from June 2012 to October 2013, she worked as a producer for the interactive documentary project LandofOpportunity.

Laine is now a station producer at WWNO, the managing editor of Nolavie.com, producer of the Moth Storyslam, and runs her own live storytelling event called Bring Your Own.

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Latest News
11:53 am
Thu August 7, 2014

NOPD Seeks New Spokesperson: Extended Interview With The Advocate's Danny Monteverde

The NOPD is looking for a new spokesperson.
Credit tonbabydc / flickr.com

The New Orleans Police Department is looking for a new official spokesperson. This Thursday marks the deadline for submitting an application, and the NOPD will hire someone by the end of the month. We spoke with the New Orleans Advocate’s police reporter Danny Monteverde about who the police department is looking for to fill the position.

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Latest News
5:08 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

NOPD Seeks New Spokesperson With Social Media Skills

The New Orleans Police Department
Credit Quinn Dombrowski / flickr.com

The New Orleans Police Department is looking for a new official spokesperson. As it looks for a new mouthpiece, there’s something the NOPD realizes it’s been missing out on: Twitter.

Danny Monteverde is the police reporter for the New Orleans Advocate. He says the NOPD wants someone who knows how to send a message in under 140 characters.

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Coastal Desk
5:17 am
Fri July 25, 2014

Working Coast Camp In Houma Teaches Children About Big Industry

The Working Coast campers set out fishing on their last day.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

South Louisiana’s Terrebonne Parish has low unemployment — there are lots of jobs in offshore services. So many that there could be a shortage of locals with the skills needed. The Working Coast summer camp in Houma teaches kids about the big industries in their area, and aims to get them excited about those career paths.

About 30 kids hang their fishing poles over a small bridge outside the Water Life Museum in Houma, Louisiana. They’re enjoying their last day at the Working Coast Camp.

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Coastal Desk
5:00 am
Fri July 25, 2014

Coastal Rundown: Austin Badon, Marsh Buggies And Golden Meadow

Austin Badon overlooking the wetlands on Paris Road in New Orleans East
Credit Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Welcome to the Coastal Rundown, a new series exploring the people, places, gear, facts and suggested resources across the Gulf Coast.

 

Meet: Austin Badon

City Council Representative, District 100

State Rep. (D), Chairman of the House Education Committee

Motto: “Don’t wait for your ship to come in, swim out to it.”

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Bring Your Own
6:00 am
Thu July 24, 2014

Bring Your Own Presents: 'Something Fishy'

Laine on the eve before her surgery.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in living rooms, backyards and other intimate spaces within the community. Each month, seven storytellers have 7 minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

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Coastal Desk
5:37 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Funds Still Needed To Rebuild Cat Island, But Restoration Begins

The 2010 BP Oil Spill ruined the Cat Island bird sanctuary, a pelican nesting site.
Credit Ron Knight / Flickr

The 2010 BP Oil Spill ruined the Cat Island bird sanctuary, a pelican nesting site. Plaquemines Parish got initial funds to restore the island, but has failed to raise the rest needed. Now, the project leader is starting restoration anyway.

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Coastal Desk
5:56 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Environmentalists Trek 100 Miles To Governor's Mansion To Protest Block Of Levee Board Lawsuit

Kirk Green and Jenna DeBoisblanc walk along LA 1 towards Baton Rouge.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A group of environmentalists are walking 100 miles from Grand Isle to Baton Rouge, along Louisiana Highway 1. They’re protesting Governor Jindal’s signing of Senate Bill 469, which blocked a New Orleans levee board lawsuit against oil and gas companies.

The members hail from around Louisiana. They want Gulf residents to be more aware of decisions made in Baton Rouge that impact their coastal communities.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Thu June 5, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: George Barisich

George Barisich.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Wed June 4, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: Greg Miller

Greg Miller.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Tue June 3, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: John Taylor

John Taylor.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp.” Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

Read more

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