Laine Kaplan-Levenson

Producer

Laine Kaplan-Levenson is the host and producer of WWNO's history podcast TriPod: New Orleans at 300, and was formally the station's Coastal Producer. Laine also runs a live storytelling series called Bring Your Own,  and has had work featured on NPRMarketplace, Latino USA, BackStoryHere and Now, and more. 

Ways to Connect

Karen Gadbois

A new series of highly visible art, preservation and reconstruction projects in New Orleans have popped up throughout New Orleans since Hurricane Katrina — work that strives to retain the integral nature of the city’s culture and promote resilience. But things don’t always go according to plan, and sometimes projects are abandoned midway. This is a story of preservation gone wrong, one group’s response, and a look towards the future. 


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Need a good tip to keep the energy bill down? Leave the house:

FRIDAY, 6/14:

Kat Arnold

It’s hard to believe that May is over, and as summer creeps in the entertainment has yet to come to a lull. There’s music to hear, sports to watch, performances to bet on, and it all starts now:

FRIDAY, 5/31

It’s a holiday weekend, with a lot of opportunities to party — hopefully this three- (or four-, or five-) day vacation won’t go from being a long weekend to a lost weekend… So here are some things to keep you on your feet:

FRIDAY, 5/24

Graphic Design: Ian Hoch

This weekend, Bayou St. John gets one more hit before it’s slower summer/fall/winter season with the B-o-o-g-a-l-o-o. Go to that, but go to these things, too:

FRIDAY, 5/17

Nina Feldman

You may have seen it before: a behemoth of a vehicle, rolling at a snail’s pass up Canal Street blasting speaker smashing beats. Its violet exterior shields its partiers from the outside world — all that can be seen of them are their arms, flailing wildly from every open window. And then there is the noise: a penetrating boom that reverberates off the surrounding buildings, shakes the bus and compels riders and bystanders alike to bounce up and down.

Hear that? The birds chirping, the construction on Esplanade, yep — New Orleans is back to normal. Jazz Fest came and went, and now it’s up to us to keep having fun. Shouldn’t be that hard:

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Despite flash flood warnings and the Fairgrounds not looking to dry up until next year’s Fest, there’s still reason to celebrate. Music is everywhere, from the Bayou to Tchoupitoulas, and so much so that it’s almost impossible not to end up at one fest or another over the next few days. So whether you’re down to drop some dough, or are looking for a free ride, we’ve got your weekend:

The Kingsley House is holding its 4th Annual Friendraiser Luncheon on April 30, from 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.  Known as 'the oldest settlement house in the South', Kingsley House was founded in 1896 and started off as a settlement house for immigrants to overcome language cultural and social barriers as they came to settle in New Orleans.

Today, the mission is to educate children, strengthen families and improve community.  The organization  achieves this through childcare, healthcare for adults and seniors, after school teen programs, family counseling services... and that’s just the shortlist.

Nina Feldman / NolaVie

The people of Bayou St. John tell of merriment and traffic as the festival descends on their neighborhood. 

In shady Bayou St. John, the neighbors really know each other.  The same crew assembles each morning at the local coffee house to read the paper and debate its assertions; another crowd convenes at the various watering holes each evening.

“It’s one of the great things about this neighborhood,” says Fortin St. resident Jonas Bishop. “The fact that I know everyone on my block… It’s definitely a community-centric area that you don’t find a lot of places.”

Delanie Manuel, server at Liuzza’s by the Track and Jonas’ neighbor, agrees. “I thought I’d be a Quarter Rat forever,” she admits. “But no, I love it here.”

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