Laine Kaplan-Levenson

Producer

Laine Kaplan-Levenson is the host and producer of WWNO's history podcast TriPod: New Orleans at 300, and was formally the station's Coastal Producer. Laine also runs a live storytelling series called Bring Your Own,  and has had work featured on NPRMarketplace, Latino USA, BackStoryHere and Now, and more. 

Ways to Connect

Laine Kaplan-Levenson

More than eight years after it flooded and closed due to Hurricane Katrina, the Circle Food Store on the corner of Claiborne and St. Bernard Avenues is about to reopen its doors. The historic landmark served the 7th Ward from 1938 up until the storm, and it’s said to have been the first New Orleans grocery owned and operated by African-Americans. Long time residents and customers voice their reactions to the long-awaited return of this neighborhood staple.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson

The 195 year-old First Presbyterian Church in Broadmoor is growing. It's in no small part thanks to a new pastor, who is reaching out to new communities and luring more people with special events. Like a square dance. With red beans... and beer... in a church? 

Svetlana Volic

Local theater companies Mondo Bizarro and Artspot Productions have collaborated for the third time with Cry You One. A three-hour experience that takes place completely outdoors, Cry You One focuses on the people and cultures of South Louisiana.

Ann Harkness

The Angola 3 refers to three men convicted of murdering a prison guard at the Louisiana State Penitentiary more than 40 years ago, in 1972. Robert King, Herman Wallace, and Albert Woodfox were accused of the crime, and then held mostly in solitary confinement for decades.

King’s conviction was overturned in 2001, and this month a federal judge released Herman Wallace, saying he did not receive a fair trial. Wallace died three days later in New Orleans from liver cancer.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson

 School lunch has remained a topic of national discussion since First Lady Michelle Obama helped encourage Congress to pass the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act in 2010. While schools may have had success integrating healthier options into lunch rooms, getting kids to like those options is a whole different challenge.

The Abeona House is a New Orleans preschool that’s working to address this issue, by introducing farm-to-table values to children from the very start.

Never heard of Filthy Linen Night? That's because it's the first ever (not to be confused with "Dirty" or "White"), presented by the Frenchmen Art Market. The event has chartered a retro party bus to shuttle folks from the Frenchmen to St. Claude Art Markets, and back. 

Laine Kaplan-Levenson

Every summer the NFL Foundation and USA Football Youth Summit choose 50 high school coaches of the year, one to represent each state, and they meet to talk about best practices for young players. The 2013 Louisiana coach of the year is Dominic Saltaformaggio, of the East Jefferson Warriors. He’s been with the team for five seasons, but has yet to win a state championship.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson joined the Warriors in pre-season practice to find out why a man waiting for a trophy is still number one. 

Todd Seelie / http://www.todseelie.com/

New Orleans thinks of brass band music as its own, the unmistakable mix of live horns and percussion, and the traditional brass band songs. But a 20-piece brass band from Rhode Island swept through town recently, with Balkan, Klezmer and Bollywood beats thrown in the mix. These Providence musicians call New Orleans their sister city, and play a different kind of brass when they're here.

Jeffrey Schwartz and Jessica Fisch

If you’re driving down Broad Street in the evening, you might notice some new bright neon signs. They're a collaboration between the Arts Council of New Orleans, local designers and a local community development non-profit.

As more businesses boast neon signs along this historic corridor, The Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Club is the most recent organization to partner with Broad Community Connections and the Iconic Signage Project.

Karen Gadbois

A new series of highly visible art, preservation and reconstruction projects in New Orleans have popped up throughout New Orleans since Hurricane Katrina — work that strives to retain the integral nature of the city’s culture and promote resilience. But things don’t always go according to plan, and sometimes projects are abandoned midway. This is a story of preservation gone wrong, one group’s response, and a look towards the future. 


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