Laine Kaplan-Levenson

Producer

Laine Kaplan-Levenson is the host and producer of WWNO's history podcast TriPod: New Orleans at 300, and was formally the station's Coastal Producer. Laine also runs a live storytelling series called Bring Your Own,  and has had work featured on NPRMarketplace, Latino USA, BackStoryHere and Now, and more. 

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TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with another edition of TriPod Xtras. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson and Dartmouth history professor Rashauna Johnson have talked before for the show. This time, their conversation was taped live during the 2017 Organization of American Historians conference that took place earlier this year. The two discussed Johnson’s first book, Slavery's Metropolis: Unfree Labor in New Orleans during the Age of Revolutions, which won the 2016 Williams Prize for the best book in Louisiana history.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A second line parade took place on Sunday afternoon, May 8th in New Orleans to celebrate the removal of four of the city’s confederate monuments. The first confederate monument was removed in the early hours of April 24th. Three more are slated for removal. Those celebrating the removal of the monuments were met by protesters who oppose the removal process. Three people were arrested. 

The organizing group Take Em’ Down Nola held a parade to ‘bury white supremacy.’ Co-founder Malcolm Suber addressed the crowd.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A bill that provides for the conservation of public military memorials passed a state house committee this morning. The simple language of House Bill 71 doesn’t mention the word ‘confederate’, but it has everything to do with preserving the three remaining monuments that are slated for removal. Testimonies for and against State representative Thomas Carmody’s bill were directly related to the status of the PT Beauregard, Robert E Lee, and Jefferson Davis statues.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

New Orleans has taken down one of the four confederate monuments slated for removal. Last night, protestors and counter protesters clashed at the Jefferson Davis monument in Mid City. 

A small group protesting the removal of the monuments stood guard over a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. They lit candles and waved confederate flags. Some were armed with assault weapons. A crowd of over 200 counter protesters joined the demonstration yelling ‘take ‘em down.’

Karen Alesich watched the scene from across the street as tensions rose.

Pat Denton Collection, Newcomb Archives Tulane.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part II of its series on the battle over the Equal Rights Amendment. Listen to Part I here.

Pat Denton Collection / Newcomb Archives, Tulane University

This is the first in a two-part series on the local Second-wave feminist movement and the battle over the Equal Rights Amendment. Listen to Part II here. 

It’s July 3rd, 1982. Feminists are marching through downtown New Orleans in support of the Equal Rights Amendment, the ERA.

Infrogmation / Wikimedia Commons

This is another edition of TriPod Xtras. We’ve cut together some highlights from a really interesting panel we went to a little while back, put on by the Broadmoor Improvement Association and held at Propeller. This event was right up our alley, because it was like a mashup of oral history and community engagement, and gave space for elders to share their experiences alongside folks that are doing work today.

The Charles L. Franck Studio Collection / The Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a retrospective look at Mardi Gras, and the year that carnival took place in the dark. Hear the TriPod Xtras extended interview with Rien Fertel. 

Right now, you might not be itching for Mardi Gras, since it just happened and everything, but imagine what it will feel like six months from now when you haven’t caught any beads, or a shoe, or a light up clicky thing, and still have another six months to go. It can be rough.

The Charles L. Franck Studio Collection / The Historic New Orleans Collection

Tripod Xtras feature one on one interviews with special guests. This week’s TriPod episode focuses on Mardi Gras 1946 and the strike of the flambeaux carriers that left the major parades rolling with little to no light at all. This is an extended interview with Rien Fertel, writer, teacher, and historian from Louisiana. Rien just

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