Laine Kaplan-Levenson

Producer

Laine Kaplan-Levenson is a multimedia producer living in New Orleans. Laine was the first Coastal Producer for WWNO's Coastal Desk, and is now the host and producer of TriPod: New Orleans at 300, WWNO's Tricentennial series. She also runs a live storytelling series called Bring Your Own. Previously, Laine was the transmedia producer for the interactive documentary project LandofOpportunity, and the managing editor for Nolavie.com. Her work has appeared on MarketplaceHere and Now, the podcast GravyNPRTakePart.com, and more. 

Ways to Connect

Hard Road Pictures

‘Levee Acoustics’ is an outdoor, acoustic music video series that highlights local musicians and physical landmarks in New Orleans. Each performance takes place somewhere on or near or the levee along the Mississippi River, honoring the significance of the waterway that snakes its way throughout the city. The musicians choose their own material and location to play along the Mississippi, giving them the chance to honor a site that is meaningful on a personal level, and offer their audience a more intimate look into sources of spatial inspiration.

 A Tobacco Card from 1887
Joseph Makkos / NOLA DNA

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a profile of Eliza Jane Nicholson, a small town poet who became the first woman publisher of a major metropolitan newspaper.


In 1834, artist George Catlin witnessed Choctaw lacrosse in Indian Territory near present-day Oklahoma.
George Catlin / Smithsonian American Art Museum

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new story about an indigenous sport that became popular before the Civil War.


The Purple Knights pose on the court; Harold Sylvester is kneeling next to his coach.
Harold Sylvester / Amistad Research Center

TriPod -- New Orleans at 300 revisits the first integrated high school sports contest in Louisiana, on February 25, 1965.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod goes back to the days when Algiers was a stomping ground for bullfights and other forms of animal combat.

It’s a Sunday afternoon. The sun is out, you’ve already gone to church, and you’re not sure what to do next. Then you find out the ferry to cross the river to Algiers is running at half rate, on account of a sporting event. A fight. Between a bull. And a grizzly bear.

Brian Fountain / flickr

The Louisiana Association of United Ways released the ALICE report this week. ALICE stands for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed -- the population of individuals and families who are working but still unable to afford the basic necessities: housing, food, childcare, healthcare and transportation.

 1918 photo of Louis Mayer's father (Louis E. Mayer), and uncles Gus (Gustave John Mayer) and Rudolph Mayer on the stage at the Turnverein von New Orleans. Uncle Gus is top left, Louis Mayer is in the middle.
Louis Mayer

When you think about gymnastics — parallel bars, the pommel horse, ropes — what else pops into your head? Fighting Napoleon and frosted beer mugs? Me too!

Here's how the Germans brought gymnastics to New Orleans.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

For the past 50 years, there has been one place you could see, without fail, James Audubon, Marie Laveau, Huey P. Long and Dracula, together in one room.

But time is running out to mingle with Louisiana’s most notable historical figures. The Musée Conti Wax Museum is closing up shop at the end of the month.

Fighting For Health Care Reform, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, 2009.
Health Care For America Now / flickr.com

The mayor’s office is working to get more New Orleanians enrolled in health coverage, and is asking barbershops and beauty salons around the city to help.

Richard David Ramsey / wikimedia commons

On MondayJohn Bel Edwards was be sworn into office as the governor on his family Bible at the state capitol.

His inauguration festivities pale in comparison to the full-blown festival thrown by Bobby Jindal when he took office. Bel Edwards had a simple ceremony during the day, and a ball that night. Jan Moller, ​director of the Louisiana Budget Project, discusses whether the pared down celebration reflects the state's fiscal woes.

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