Laine Kaplan-Levenson

Producer

Laine Kaplan-Levenson is the host and producer of WWNO's history podcast TriPod: New Orleans at 300, and was formally the station's Coastal Producer. Laine also runs a live storytelling series called Bring Your Own,  and has had work featured on NPRMarketplace, Latino USA, BackStoryHere and Now, and more. 

Ways to Connect

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

TriPod put out an episode on the legendary Lastie family — a family that holds generations of iconic musicians. I talked to drummers and first cousins Herlin Riley and Joe Lastie about their experience growing up in this musical family, what it was like to hear Professor Longhair and Dr John play in their living room, what it was like to have their introduce drums into the spiritual church, and what it was like to get yelled at by that same grandfather when they tried to play James Brown in that same spiritual church.

Photograph by Michael P. Smith / ©The Historic New Orleans Collection

Tripod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new episode that spotlights a famous musical family, the Lasties. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with drummers, and cousins, Herlin Riley and Joe Lastie. This is the first in a series of episodes focusing on the rich history of New Orleans music. Listen to the full interview with Herlin Riley and Joe Lastie here

Joshua Brasted

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new TriPod xtra segment. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with Chris Kaminstein and Kiyoko Mccray, co-directors of a new play called 'The Stranger Disease' by local theater group Goat In the Road. The three met at the historic Madame John's Legacy home in the French Quarter, where the performance takes place. Laine begins the conversation by asking Chris Kaminstein to explain the play's title.

Janet Wilson / WWNO

Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with political commentator and New Orleans native Cokie Roberts. The two discussed everything from the Me Too Movement to the 2018 midterm elections, and started local, with the city's upcoming mayoral transition.

This evening (Thursday) kicks off the tricentennial symposium ‘Making New Orleans Home.’ Organized by The Historic New Orleans Collection and the City, the event highlights 300 years of New Orleans history. Cokie Roberts is the keynote speaker. Roberts is a political commentator and a native New Orleanian - who now lives in the DC area. She says the tricentennial’s a big deal, and even though people up north might not care about the tricentennial, "they care about New Orleans.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a look at the once secret history of Gay  Carnival Krewes.  Note: this episode contains a racially insensitive word that may offend some listeners. We have included it for context.

Barrett Delong Church is showing me a giant flamingo Mardi Gras float that his husband will be riding on in the Krewe of Armenius den. Armenius is an all male, gay krewe, and it celebrated its 50th anniversary this year. I met Barrett, this year’s krewe captain, at their den the day before their big ball. This year’s theme?

Image courtesy of The Historic New Orleans Collection

The Historic New Orleans Collection held a ribbon cutting ceremony, Tuesday, February 27th, to launch a tricentennial exhibition. French dignitaries, Mayor Landrieu, City Council members, and community partners gathered on Royal Street to usher in the opening.

Team New Orleans, US Army Corps of Engineers [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Tripod’s NOLA versus Nature series returns with a story of the construction of the Industrial Canal. Host Laine  Kaplan-Levenson looks at the ways this massive infrastructure project was invasive, above and below ground. Hear the Part I on Sauve's Crevasse and Part II on Baldwin Wood

Quinn Miller-Bedell

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new TriPod Xtra segment. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with writer Nathaniel Rich to talk about his newly released third novel, King Zeno.

US Patent Office

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with its NOLA versus Nature series. This week: WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson and Travis Lux look at the city’s drainage pumps, and the man behind their design -- Albert Baldwin Wood.

New Orleans is below sea level. You know this, and certainly, if you were here this past August, you really know this. Almost a foot of rain fell over a couple hours and parts of town were knee deep in water.

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