Laine Kaplan-Levenson

Producer

Laine Kaplan-Levenson is a multimedia producer living in New Orleans. Laine is the host and producer of WWNO's history podcast TriPod: New Orleans at 300, and was formally the station's Coastal Producer. Laine also runs a live storytelling series called Bring Your Own, is a digital producer for The Listening Post, and has had work featured on MarketplaceHere and NowGravyNPRTakePart.com, and more. 

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Tune in Friday October 27 at 1pm  or Wednesday November 1 at 7pm

Once there was a slave uprising so epic, it led Napoleon to sell Louisiana to the United States, and brought thousands of refugees to New Orleans, doubling the city's population in just a few months.  The Haitian Revolution (1791-1804), the only successful slave rebellion in the Americas, had a dramatic and lasting effect on New Orleans and North America.  Today many New Orleanians, black and white, trace their ancestral roots to Haiti.  The Caribbean nation remains an important part of the story New Orleans tell about itself.  But is New Orleans a part of Haitian history?  Is the feeling mutual?  TriPod sent producer Laine Kaplan-Levenson to find out.

Wynne Muscatine Graham / WWNO

WWNO’s original history podcast TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns next week. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson traveled to Haiti this past summer and will launch the third season on Oct. 27, with an hour-long special about the relationship between Haiti and New Orleans. This documentary is called, "Haiti And New Orleans: Is The Feeling Mutual?" WWNO's Janae Pierre sat down with Laine to get a sneak peek of this TriPod special.

Andre Paultre

In this edition of TriPod Xtras, host Laine Kaplan-Levenson sits down with WWNO’s Janae Pierre to talk about a recent trip to Haiti, the end of TriPod’s second season, and a look at season three. To see photos from Laine’s reporting trip to Haiti, follow TriPod on Instagram at @TriPodnola. You can also tweet your favorite episodes at @tripodnola, and we’ll re-air them this summer, and give you a special shoutout! New TriPod xtras will be released between season 2 and season 3, but on the podcast only, so make sure you subscribe to the TriPod podcast wherever you get your podcasts. 

Mathew Brady Studio / National Archive

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a story about a monument that was supposed to be erected in the late 1800s, but never happened.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A third confederate monument in New Orleans was removed in the middle of the night. The statue of P.G.T. Beauregard that once stood at the entrance to New Orleans’ City Park is now gone.

It took almost 7 hours for workers to strap the statue of confederate general PGT Beauregard and his horse to a crane and lift it onto a flatbed truck. Karen Murray was there in protest. She wiped away angry tears as she watched workers set up in the dark.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Jefferson Davis statue was removed before sunrise on May 11th, 2017.  This is the second of four Confederate monuments slated for removal in New Orleans. Hours after the statue came down, WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson spoke to Mayor Mitch Landrieu about the safety precautions and controversy surrounding the monument removal, and how this fits into his larger vision of the city’s path towards racial conciliation.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with another edition of TriPod Xtras. Host Laine Kaplan-Levenson and Dartmouth history professor Rashauna Johnson have talked before for the show. This time, their conversation was taped live during the 2017 Organization of American Historians conference that took place earlier this year. The two discussed Johnson’s first book, Slavery's Metropolis: Unfree Labor in New Orleans during the Age of Revolutions, which won the 2016 Williams Prize for the best book in Louisiana history.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A second line parade took place on Sunday afternoon, May 8th in New Orleans to celebrate the removal of four of the city’s confederate monuments. The first confederate monument was removed in the early hours of April 24th. Three more are slated for removal. Those celebrating the removal of the monuments were met by protesters who oppose the removal process. Three people were arrested. 

The organizing group Take Em’ Down Nola held a parade to ‘bury white supremacy.’ Co-founder Malcolm Suber addressed the crowd.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A bill that provides for the conservation of public military memorials passed a state house committee this morning. The simple language of House Bill 71 doesn’t mention the word ‘confederate’, but it has everything to do with preserving the three remaining monuments that are slated for removal. Testimonies for and against State representative Thomas Carmody’s bill were directly related to the status of the PT Beauregard, Robert E Lee, and Jefferson Davis statues.

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