Laine Kaplan-Levenson

Producer

Laine Kaplan-Levenson is a multi-media producer living in New Orleans. She began her career in New Orleans as an Assistant Design Producer for the production company Rehage Entertainment, and went on to work with the local online news and culture publication NOLADefender, where she served as Assistant Publisher for two years. Then, from June 2012 to October 2013, she worked as a producer for the interactive documentary project LandofOpportunity.

Laine is now a station producer at WWNO, the managing editor of Nolavie.com, producer of the Moth Storyslam, and runs her own live storytelling event called Bring Your Own.

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Coastal Desk
5:37 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Funds Still Needed To Rebuild Cat Island, But Restoration Begins

The 2010 BP Oil Spill ruined the Cat Island bird sanctuary, a pelican nesting site.
Credit Ron Knight / Flickr

The 2010 BP Oil Spill ruined the Cat Island bird sanctuary, a pelican nesting site. Plaquemines Parish got initial funds to restore the island, but has failed to raise the rest needed. Now, the project leader is starting restoration anyway.

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Coastal Desk
5:56 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Environmentalists Trek 100 Miles To Governor's Mansion To Protest Block Of Levee Board Lawsuit

Kirk Green and Jenna DeBoisblanc walk along LA 1 towards Baton Rouge.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A group of environmentalists are walking 100 miles from Grand Isle to Baton Rouge, along Louisiana Highway 1. They’re protesting Governor Jindal’s signing of Senate Bill 469, which blocked a New Orleans levee board lawsuit against oil and gas companies.

The members hail from around Louisiana. They want Gulf residents to be more aware of decisions made in Baton Rouge that impact their coastal communities.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Thu June 5, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: George Barisich

George Barisich.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Wed June 4, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: Greg Miller

Greg Miller.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Tue June 3, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: John Taylor

John Taylor.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp.” Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
9:00 am
Mon June 2, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?

Destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned the Bayou Bienvenue freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, leaving mostly just open water.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Mon June 2, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: Amanda Moore

Amanda Moore.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Features
7:58 am
Wed May 21, 2014

This 7th Ward Skate Park Comes With A Water Management Plan

A rendering of the 'Sunny Side' section of Parisite Skate Park.
Credit Harmon-DeCotiis studio team / Tulane City Center

There are many ways to handle neighborhood flooding, beyond pumping stations and sewers. Some cities have realized that skate parks, of all places, can be used to manage water rather well. New Orleans’ new skate park is being designed as a water management tool.

It's loud underneath I-610 at Paris Avenue. Cars and trucks barrel overheard, and the overpass rumbles and thumps. But there are other noises contributing to the sea of sound: skateboards.

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Jazz Fest 2014
9:42 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Photos From The Fairgrounds: Sunday At The Jazz Fest

A giant puppet parade entering into the Casa Do Brasil area.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

Photos from the third day of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, presented by Shell. Sunday, April 27, 2014.

   

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NolaVie
5:19 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Actor Yolonda Ross Talks 'Go For Sisters' And 'Treme'

Yolonda Ross as Fontaine in the John Sayles film Go For Sisters.
Credit Kevin Long

Along with Jazz Fest comes the Sync Up Conference, several days of workshops and discussions on the business of entertainment, at New Orleans Museum of Art.

This year’s Sync Up Cinema event features John Sayles newest film, Go For Sisters, screening tomorrow afternoon. It stars actor Yolanda Ross, who also appeared in HBO's Treme. She started with how she got the role in John Sayles' new movie.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson: What was your connection to John Sayles before this film?

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