Krista Almanzan

Krista joined KAZU in 2007.  She is an award winning journalist with more than a decade of broadcast experience.  Her stories have won regional Edward R. Murrow Awards and honors from the Northern California Radio and Television News Directors Association.  Prior to working at KAZU, Krista reported in Sacramento for Capital Public Radio and at television stations in Iowa.  Like KAZU listeners, Krista appreciates the in-depth, long form stories that are unique to public radio. She's pleased to continue that tradition in the Monterey Bay Area.

All Tech Considered
7:17 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Out Of The Fields And Into Computer Science Classes

The inaugural class of the Computer Science and Information Technology program, scheduled to graduate in 2016.
Hartnell College

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 2:54 pm

To earn money for her family, Alicia Leon Rios worked in the fields in Salinas, Calif. Meanwhile, she sent her toddler, Leticia, to Mexico to be raised by her grandparents.

Even now, Alicia Leon Rios chokes up thinking about that difficult decision more than two decades ago. But it was worth it, she in Spanish, because her daughter "was able to choose another path."

That path led to college.

Fast-Track To A Degree

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Around the Nation
3:18 pm
Fri December 28, 2012

California Missions Undergo Upgrades To Resist Quakes

Scaffolding is seen at the basilica at a mission in Carmel, Calif., a sign of its multimillion-dollar seismic retrofit.
Krista Almanzan for NPR

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 4:06 pm

At California's nearly two dozen Spanish missions, conversion these days isn't just about religion; it's also about seismic retrofitting. That's because the missions — which date to the late 1700s, when Spain's king sent Franciscan missionaries to convert natives to Christianity — would not withstand a major earthquake.

At a mission in Carmel, a 220-year-old basilica is in the middle of an earthquake retrofit. Workers removed the structure's red tile roof and replaced it with scaffolding and a protective plastic.

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Music Interviews
3:58 pm
Wed July 25, 2012

The Practical Side Of The Great American Jam Band

The Grateful Dead circa 1970. The band's members were quintessential rock hippies — but, a new exhibit reveals, savvy businessmen as well.
Gems Redferns

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 6:29 pm

The Grateful Dead's eponymous live album started it all for Nicholas Meriwether.

It was 1985. He was studying history at Princeton and got hooked by psychedelic jams like "Wharf Rat." After his first concert, he knew: "I will spend the rest of my life thinking and studying this."

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London 2012: The Summer Olympics
4:21 am
Wed June 13, 2012

Fencing's Father-Son Duo Hones An Olympic Dream

Alexander Massialas (left) lands a touch on Britain's Keith Cook during last year's Fencing International Invitation in London.
Sang Tan AP

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 7:17 pm

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Around the Nation
2:17 am
Mon May 14, 2012

Santa Cruz Surfers Make Coastline A Reserve

A surfer rides a wave at Steamer Lane, with the Santa Cruz Wharf in the background. A long swath of Santa Cruz's coast has been designated a World Surfing Reserve.
Stephen Dunn Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 5:44 am

You may think of surfers as slackers. But in Santa Cruz, Calif., they're city council members and business owners. And they're also conservationists — who just got their piece of the central California coast named a World Surfing Reserve.

Long before surf music topped the charts and long before surfers had crazy nicknames, surfers have been riding the waves in Santa Cruz.

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Space
5:12 am
Sat February 11, 2012

A Real Estate Deal That Spans The Earth

The Jamesburg Earth Station closed in 2002, but the 10-story satellite dish still stands tall.
Courtesy of Bert Aronson

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 10:46 am

For sale: 160 acres of rolling hills in California perfect for a vineyard, cattle ranch or communication with outer space.

To understand how Silicon Valley businessman Jeffrey Bullis ended up owning the Jamesburg Earth Station — a former telecommunications center with a 10-story satellite dish — you have to think back to 2004.

The real estate market was booming. Bullis was visiting a friend in Carmel Valley on California's Central Coast, where homes can still sell for millions.

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