Kate Archer Kent

Kate launched Red River Radio's news division in January 2006. In her one-person shop, she gathers news and perspectives from around the Ark-La-Tex for weekday newscasts that air at 6:06, 6:38, 7:06 and 8:06 a.m.

Previously, she served as director of marketing and public relations for Louisiana Tech University. She also held a similar position at Northeast Iowa Community College. Before entering educational marketing and communications, she was communications coordinator for Regis Corporation in Minneapolis.

Kate has worked for several media outlets. In 2003, she became a contributing reporter and producer for KEDM Public Radio in Monroe, La., and Red River Radio. She was named Reporter of the Year by the Louisiana Associated Press Broadcasters Association in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012. She was a Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize finalist for a series on drug addiction.

Kate has also been an assignment desk editor for the Fox affiliate in Minneapolis. Through a fellowship with the International Radio and Television Society, she worked as a feed producer for CBS "Newspath" in New York.

Kate holds a master of journalism degree from Temple University and a B.A. in English and political science from the University of Minnesota. She lives in Shreveport with her husband, Alexandyr, and their two children, Bronwyn and Oliver. In her spare time, Kate enjoys teaching twice-weekly, free community yoga practices at Sadhu Vaswani Hindu Cultural Center in Shreveport.


The 30th season of the Texas Shakespeare Festival is underway on the Kilgore College campus.

In 32 days, this professional company stages 54 Shakespearian performances.

Artistic director Raymond Caldwell started the festival. He never imagined it would be so successful. Caldwell and his small staff sift through more than 3,000 resumes to fill 22 summer acting jobs. They go to New York and Chicago to hold auditions. Most of the actors, he says, are fresh out of college.

Nearly 9,000 educators from across the country will begin meeting Friday in Orlando, Florida, for the National Education Association’s Representative Assembly. The assembly is the decision-making body for the NEA, which has over three million members.

A children’s discovery center under construction in downtown Longview is closer to becoming a reality.

Volunteers of Longview World of Wonders or WOW have raised almost $1.7 million as part of a $2.4 million capital campaign launched a little more than two years ago. Much of that money to date has been used to renovate a building – a former furniture store. It’s now move-in ready and has an occupancy permit, according to LongviewWOW advisory board president Lisa Yarbrough.

LSU Shreveport and Caddo Parish Schools have inked an agreement that will streamline the process to secure a teaching job in one of the district’s 62 schools.

The memorandum of understanding was signed Tuesday morning in front of an audience attending Shreve Island Elementary’s kindergarten graduation.

LSU Shreveport chancellor Larry Clark said education majors will get preferential hiring treatment in Caddo Schools and will be privy to district hiring trends so they can tailor their degree program early on and become highly employable upon graduation.

The weeklong Louisiana Boys and Girls State leadership programs are underway on the Northwestern State University campus. More than 800 rising high school seniors from every parish have convened. Dozens of counselors lead the program. They’ve been a participant – or citizen – before. Citizen engagement staff member William Hogan teaches social studies at Simsboro High School in Lincoln Parish.

Today is Juneteenth, commemorating 150 years since emancipation in Texas. An exhibit at the Nacogdoches Railroad Depot brings to life the faces of 45 runaway slaves. The artwork is based on runaway slave newspaper ads in Louisiana and Texas from the mid-1800s. It’s part of the Texas Runaway Slave Project.

Stephen F. Austin State University special collections librarian Kyle Ainsworth compiled a database of 1,400 newspaper ads. These became the inspiration for a new exhibit “Portraits of Freedom.”

A week of pre-bidding is underway for a collection of space memorabilia owned by the late Leon Ford of Haughton, La.

A total of 104 items will be on the live auction block in Boston next week. Ford was considered one of the major collectors of NASA and Apollo artifacts, according to RR Auction executive vice president Bob Livingston. He expects the auction will bring in about $600,000.

Lake Bistineau in northwest Louisiana is above flood stage and closed to boat traffic, but the park remains open. The lake is connected to the Red River via Loggy Bayou. Lake manager David Jett is tracking a slow and steady decline in the lake level over the past two days. He’s seen a bigger Bistineau.

“Oh my goodness, I’ve seen it much higher than this. In fact, it was higher than this back in the early spring. In 2009, if I recall correctly, the lake level went up to 147 feet,” Jett said.

More than 100 bee colonies have perished in the Red River flood. Local beekeepers say this will greatly reduce the amount of honey produced in North Louisiana in the coming months. William Hummer owns Hummer and Son Honey Farm in Bossier City. He’s lost about 20 percent of his operation. Flood waters inundated 100 colonies.

“Normally we should be pulling honey in and just be tired, sweaty and sticky. Now we’re pulling a little honey in and building up more colonies at the same time,” Hummer said.

Hundreds of veterans who live in the rural reaches of the Ark-La-Tex may no longer have to drive to Overton Brooks VA Medical Center in Shreveport for routine appointments. Their doctor will be beamed in to a location in their town -- or perhaps their driveway -- thanks to a $2 million rural health grant.