Kate Archer Kent

Kate launched Red River Radio's news division in January 2006. In her one-person shop, she gathers news and perspectives from around the Ark-La-Tex for weekday newscasts that air at 6:06, 6:38, 7:06 and 8:06 a.m.

Previously, she served as director of marketing and public relations for Louisiana Tech University. She also held a similar position at Northeast Iowa Community College. Before entering educational marketing and communications, she was communications coordinator for Regis Corporation in Minneapolis.

Kate has worked for several media outlets. In 2003, she became a contributing reporter and producer for KEDM Public Radio in Monroe, La., and Red River Radio. She was named Reporter of the Year by the Louisiana Associated Press Broadcasters Association in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012. She was a Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize finalist for a series on drug addiction.

Kate has also been an assignment desk editor for the Fox affiliate in Minneapolis. Through a fellowship with the International Radio and Television Society, she worked as a feed producer for CBS "Newspath" in New York.

Kate holds a master of journalism degree from Temple University and a B.A. in English and political science from the University of Minnesota. She lives in Shreveport with her husband, Alexandyr, and their two children, Bronwyn and Oliver. In her spare time, Kate enjoys teaching twice-weekly, free community yoga practices at Sadhu Vaswani Hindu Cultural Center in Shreveport.

 

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NPR Story
9:32 am
Wed February 11, 2015

LSU Health Shreveport surgeon finds deviation in breast cancer care in national study

LSU Health Shreveport surgeon Dr. Quyen Chu and his colleagues reviewed data from the national cancer database for a year.

Breast cancer patients who undergo a mastectomy should receive radiation treatment if the cancer has spread to four or more nearby lymph nodes. That’s standard care. But only 65 percent of women get post-mastectomy radiation therapy, according to a new study released Tuesday by the American College of Surgeons.

Dr. Quyen Chu, a surgery professor at LSU Health Shreveport, analyzed almost 57,000 cases of locally advanced breast cancer occurring between 1998 and 2011, housed in the National Cancer Data Base.

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Red River Radio
8:25 am
Tue February 10, 2015

Federal funds flow into dredging the Red River

Originally published on Tue February 10, 2015 10:34 am

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is allocating $2.4 million on top of congressional spending this year for dredging the Red River. The J. Bennett Johnston Waterway Navigation Project received the additional funds for operation and maintenance. The head of the Red River Waterway Commission, Ken Guidry, says the funding is critical to keep industries based at the Port of Caddo-Bossier and the Alexandria Port.

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Red River Radio
8:53 am
Mon February 9, 2015

'Krewe de Quit' is Louisiana's latest effort to curb smoking

A group of health organizations trying to help Louisianans quit smoking has formed a krewe in the Mardi Gras tradition. The new Krewe De Quit is an online initiative that brings smokers together around the shared bonds of a krewe. Ochsner Clinic’s Dr. W. Brooks Emory has been a pulmonary care specialist for 45 years. He says tobacco is ten times more addictive than heroine, which makes it very difficult to break the habit. He says it helps to have people doing it with you.

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NPR Story
9:23 am
Fri February 6, 2015

Horticulturists to explain how to simplify Louisiana gardens at Ruston workshop

Horticulturist Greg Grant of Arcadia, Texas, says he's always digging up and moving around plants in his country cottage garden, but that's just because he likes to.

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 9:37 am

A half-day workshop Saturday at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston will show gardeners how to simplify their landscape so that maintaining it takes less time.

Greg Grant, a research associate at Stephen F. Austin State University’s Pineywoods Native Plant Center, is all-consumed by his country cottage garden in Arcadia, Texas. But he’s OK with that. He will tell gardeners to exercise discipline when they buy plants at the nursery, and to think about how the foliage will look well into the future.

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NPR Story
9:22 am
Thu February 5, 2015

African American history in Marshall, Texas, chronicled in new video

The Marshall Historic Landmark Preservation Board will debut a 30-minute video Thursday that showcases the city’s African American heritage. It’s called “The Buard History Trail.”

The video is a montage of interviews and historic photos that highlight the local Civil Rights leaders whose work altered America’s racial divide. The trail shows some of the places where this history happened, and makes the case that African Americans made a remarkable contribution to Marshall’s growth and development.

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NPR Story
10:06 am
Wed February 4, 2015

LSU Shreveport historian completes Russian war memoirs anthology

LSU Shreveport military historian Alexander Mikaberidze is an expert on the Napoleonic Era, and has a doctorate from Florida State University.

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 1:22 pm

A military historian at LSU Shreveport is out with his third volume in an ongoing anthology of Russian memoirs that are part of the “Eyewitness Accounts” series.

Alexander Mikaberidze read more than 4,200 pages of Russian diaries, memoirs and reports about Napoleonic Wars involving Russia for his latest effort.

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Environment
5:16 pm
Tue February 3, 2015

EPA Push For Massive Munitions Burn Ignites Opposition In Louisiana

Melissa Downer and her family moved to Camp Minden, La., 11 years ago and live on three acres. The mother of three young daughters says they'll move if the M6 is burned in the open air.
Kate Archer Kent Red River Radio

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 7:17 pm

Explosions used to be no big deal for residents of sleepy rural towns in north Louisiana's piney woods near the Arkansas border. Blasts meant jobs.

The Army's Camp Minden was the site of a former ammunition factory built during World War II. The factory closed in the 1990s. Still, the place is littered with millions of pounds of leftover artillery waste.

The stuff in question is called M6, a toxic propellant in grenades and artillery rounds. The Army doesn't use it anymore, and tons of M6 are stored in bunkers at Camp Minden.

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NPR Story
10:15 am
Tue February 3, 2015

Nacogdoches embraces trail vision with 'Ab Abernethy Day'

Sometimes called a Renaissance man and trailblazer, Dr. F.E. "Ab" Abernethy is pictured in the creek in 2011.

The preservation society Friends of Historic Nacogdoches Inc. is blazing a trail to honor a Nacogdoches resident who has created walking trails along two creeks one ax swing at a time.

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NPR Story
11:28 am
Mon February 2, 2015

Centenary's 'The Forum' to delve into diversity and race relations

The Forum will feature Michigan State University philosophy professor Kristie Dotson.

Diversity and racial justice will be discussed Monday as part of “The Forum,” an annual event put on by Centenary College’s philosophy department.

The event, over two Mondays, includes a speech from a guest author and a and community panel discussion. Centenary philosophy professor Chris Ciocchetti says it’s time for philosophers tackle the ongoing discussion about diversity.

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Red River Radio
9:10 am
Fri January 30, 2015

Obesity toolkit to help Louisiana's pediatricians address weight issues head on

LSU’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge has launched a new initiative aimed at helping reduce obesity in children.

The center released its new Childhood Obesity Treatment Toolkit Thursday. It gives the state’s primary care physicians tactics for evaluating childhood obesity and approaches to treatment. The center is distributing more than 2,000 toolkits statewide, according to Pennington’s pediatric obesity researcher Dr. Amanda Staiano.

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