Josh Jackson

'Treme' Ep. 31: To Call It Quits

Nov 29, 2012

At the end of Treme's season three, with only an abbreviated season four to come, we find many characters walking away from opportunities. Spoiler alert for what follows.

'Treme,' Ep. 29: Heckuva View

Nov 13, 2012

After the musical bonanza that was the Mardi Gras episode, things slow down for some plot development in episode eight of Treme's third season. The writing team sticks to its other strengths: the minutiae of a broken police system, how to run a restaurant, bureaucracy in action and various romantic interludes.

But a few live music scenes do make it to screen. Here's Josh Jackson of WBGO for some analysis.

'Treme,' Ep. 27: Fat Tuesday 2008

Nov 5, 2012

The three seasons of Treme have all found their way to Mardi Gras; appropriately, the day is always depicted with all the spectacle, vice and musical mayhem you might expect. Josh Jackson of WBGO returns to break down the many musical scenes in this year's go-round.


Patrick Jarenwattananon: So many flashes of live music this episode. Let's start at the beginning. Did you recognize the band where Lieut. Colson and his fellow officer are talking, and there are (clothed) women on poles in the French Quarter?

'Treme,' Ep. 26: That's What Buddy Bolden Said

Oct 22, 2012

Certain episodes of Treme seem to wear their ideological hearts on their sleeves, and this was one. You open with Desiree's mother's house getting torn down in a city mix-up; you have Davis throwing around phrases like "preservation through neglect"; you see housing projects torn down amid protest with the implication of a corrupt deal; you get protagonists like the Bernette family being harassed by police; you witness clueless developers trying to build a national jazz center while waiting for the other shoe to drop.

If you've been watching the HBO series Treme with us, welcome back.

If you're new here, welcome in the first place. WBGO's Josh Jackson, a New Orleans native, and I have been watching the music-saturated program set in post-Katrina New Orleans for two years now. After every episode, we try to establish some context for the many musical references and live performances the show features.

When Baron Toots Thielemans, the Belgian harmonica legend, guested on Gregoire Maret's self-titled debut, the sense was that Maret himself had been knighted. He'd already proven himself worthy on recordings with Pat Metheny and Jacky Terrasson, but until recently, the 37-year-old didn't have his own singular statement to drive the point home.