Ian McNulty

Producer

Ian covers food culture and dining in New Orleans through his weekly commentary series Where Y’Eat. 

Ian is also a staff writer for the daily newspaper the New Orleans Advocate, covering the culture, personality and trends behind the city’s famous dining scene.

He is the author of two books - “Louisiana Rambles: Exploring America’s Cajun and Creole Heartland,” a travel narrative about south Louisiana culture, and “A Season of Night: New Orleans Life After Katrina,” an account of the first months in the city after Hurricane Katrina.

He has been a contributor to WWNO since 2009.

Ian McNulty

Ian McNulty

We here in Louisiana have never been bashful when expressing our feeling for oysters. We devour them fried, grilled, broiled and baked, and we ravish them raw. But look around the New Orleans restaurant scene these days and it feels like the relationship has reached a new level of affection, and even infatuation.

Ian McNulty

It sounds so fundamentally good, so easy, so natural — it’s dinner out on the town with someone special, with your sweetheart. Well, pull your head out of the clouds, lover boy, because this is no time to be getting all mushy. This is Valentine’s Day. And this is serious business.

Ian McNulty

Ian McNulty


Ian McNulty

For Antoine’s Restaurant, the oldest restaurant in New Orleans, 2015 marks its 175th birthday. And, naturally, events and promotions will unfold through the year tied to its long history and deep well of tradition. But, even as it celebrates its past, Antoine’s is also using this anniversary to introduce changes that are aimed squarely at the future, and even at its very survival.

Ian McNulty

Picture some friends sharing and sampling a progression of small plates and you have a very modern portrait of casual dining. But, in another example of how new trends at the dinner table often reflect old customs, you can assemble that same scene around Turkish flavors and see a very traditional view of social dining. That’s one on display in New Orleans these days at an Uptown eatery called Mezze.

Ian McNulty


Ian McNulty


Ian McNulty

For players and coaches, a football game starts long before kickoff. The same holds true for the food-minded Saints fan. For such fans, it starts with choosing what to cook and devoting the hands-on work to ensure a victorious feast.

It's really no wonder. Take the enthusiasm of the Who Dat Nation, add south Louisiana's endemic passion for food and the results are predictably over the top.

Pages