Ian McNulty

Producer

Ian is the host of Where Y’Eat and the Community Impact series at WWNO.

Each week, Ian shares his commentary on the intriguing food culture of New Orleans and south Louisiana with WWNO’s Where Y’Eat. He also shines light on the difference that innovative nonprofits are making across the New Orleans region through WWNO’s Community Impact series, interviewing nonprofit leaders and the people they serve.  Ian first became a WWNO contributor in 2009. He is a freelance journalist and a published author. A native of Rhode Island, Ian is a graduate of Rutgers University. He has lived in New Orleans since 1999.

Ian McNulty

The revival of a classic backstreet seafood restaurant helps restore more than just a roster of familiar dishes.

Ian McNulty

There is a growing number of options for New Orleans barbecue fanatics, and, at new shop in particular, a distinctly local view at the smoker.

It can be a tricky business to declare something a "golden age" while you’re right in the midst of it. That sort of analysis is usually better left to hindsight. But still, for barbecue fanatics, there has probably never been a better time to be alive and eating in New Orleans than right now.

Ian McNulty

After building familiarity and followings, one-time pop-up dining concepts are making the leap to become fulltime restaurants around New Orleans.

Food terms like pancit noodles, lumpia eggrolls and the pork and tamarind-based soup called sinigang are not exactly household words in New Orleans. But when the local chef Cristina Quackenbush debuted her new Filipino restaurant Milkfish she found a familiar crowd eager to dine on dishes like these, starting right on opening night.

Ian McNulty

New Orleans is obsessed with food and music, but how often do they share equal billing under the same roof here? We've scouted some new and old favorite options, from barbecue with blues to contemporary jazz with Creole flavors.

Ian McNulty

From physical expansions to spin-offs to a high-profile second concept, ambitious chefs are finding different ways to expand while keeping the dining options coming.

Open a burger joint or coffee shop and the path to expansion can be as clear as a roadmap: find a good location and replicate.

Ian McNulty

The enterprising neighbors and opportune eats in the colorful neighborhood around the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival make for an appetizing scene before or after the show.

Everyone knows you should be ready to eat during a day at Jazz Fest. But no one says you have to show up starving. And on the way back out, I’ve found it’s a good idea to have a little room in the tank too, to be ready for opportune eats.

Ian McNulty

Just as some fans of Jazz Fest plan their days to make the most of all the music available, the food obsessed must make their town blueprint the handle the cornucopia of Louisiana flavors around the event.

Ian McNulty

In a sea of diverse dining concepts, a small current of new eateries are dialing back to a much older model of New Orleans flavor.

Hogs for the Cause, a charitable cook-off and festival, has quickly established a niche in New Orleans restaurant subculture.

Pages