Ian McNulty

Producer

Ian covers food culture and dining in New Orleans through his weekly commentary series Where Y’Eat. 

Ian is also a staff writer for the daily newspaper the New Orleans Advocate, covering the culture, personality and trends behind the city’s famous dining scene.

He is the author of two books - “Louisiana Rambles: Exploring America’s Cajun and Creole Heartland,” a travel narrative about south Louisiana culture, and “A Season of Night: New Orleans Life After Katrina,” an account of the first months in the city after Hurricane Katrina.

He has been a contributor to WWNO since 2009.

"Place-based initiatives" is a big buzz phrase in philanthropy circles these days. It means taking a comprehensive approach to improving a neighborhood, considering how factors like jobs, education, transportation and housing all interact in a specific place. But even if you've never heard that term before, if you live in the New Orleans area, chances are you already know what it means.

Ian McNulty

It's the dishes with a bit of a drawl that jump off the menu at High Hat Café — the Delta-style tamales napped neatly in their cornhusks, a pimento cheese plate, homey sides of beans and greens and the restaurant's centerpiece, fried catfish with hushpuppies, a dish that's practically the fish and chips of cotton country.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

If some people out there still don't yet appreciate the heritage of our cuisine and the natural abundance that fuels it, I really wish they would get with the program already. After all, I don't think our region can stand another brutal lesson in just how much it all means.

Arnaud's Restaurant

The holiday season is my favorite time to be in the French Quarter. The Old World architecture and the narrow streets seem especially evocative. Strings of lights curl around wrought iron balconies like ivy, carriageways are framed in green flocking and some gas lanterns even wear red Christmas bows as their orange flames flicker away against brick and reflect on flagstone paving.

The McKenzie's Pastry Shoppes of New Orleans were born in the Great Depression, not an easy time for a new business to get started. Maybe that has something to do with why the old brand is so darn tough.

The Vietnamese Po-Boy

Jul 15, 2010
Ian McNulty

Southern Food & Beverage Museum

People around south Louisiana know better than most how the feeling of a special place can endure even after it's been wiped from the map. Sometimes it's just the recollection of happy times or meaningful occasions spent there, like at family homes now plowed under or churches or schools disappeared from a city's landscape. And sometimes a bit more remains, something tangible like a memento from a landmark destination now vanished.

Schexnayder Meats

Aug 21, 2009
Photo courtesy of marketumbrella.org

Over the past hundred years, German surnames have been associated with meats, dairies and bakeries throughout Southeast Louisiana. One German name market shoppers associate with good flavor is Schexnayder, makers of traditional cured meat products.

You'll find them roasting and sampling in a number of area markets. Consider a quick drive to the Wednesday German Coast Farmers Market in St. Charles Parish to meet the Schexnayders on their home turf selling alligator sausage, hogs head cheese, and even beef jerky.

Pages