Ian McNulty

Producer

Ian covers food culture and dining in New Orleans through his weekly commentary series Where Y’Eat. 

Ian is also a staff writer for the daily newspaper the New Orleans Advocate, covering the culture, personality and trends behind the city’s famous dining scene.

He is the author of two books - “Louisiana Rambles: Exploring America’s Cajun and Creole Heartland,” a travel narrative about south Louisiana culture, and “A Season of Night: New Orleans Life After Katrina,” an account of the first months in the city after Hurricane Katrina.

He has been a contributor to WWNO since 2009.

Fish Tales at Kanno

Feb 3, 2012
Ian McNulty / WWNO

Along the diverse, densely-packed blocks of Fat City you’ll find a creative Japanese chef crafting exquisite compositions.

In 2009, St. Bernard Parish resident Elizabeth Richardson was the victim of extreme violence. She feels blessed to be alive, though she still grieves for her daughter, India Mahoney, who did not survive.

 

“He came in at 5:30 in the morning and he shot me in the face three times and my 18-year-old daughter was killed that morning, point blank,” Richardson says. “And then this man left the house and locked the door and ran off like nothing happened.”

Caribbean Creole

Jan 26, 2012

Writer Ian McNulty  checks out the West Bank restaurant Taste of the Caribbean 

Ian McNulty / WWNO

Giselle Nakhid leads a community dance class early one evening at the Ashé Cultural Arts Center in the Central City neighborhood of New Orleans. The class is called Sistas Making a Change, and as the name suggests, the ladies who participate in this free, weekly gathering get more than a few dance moves. They hear from experts on health topics, they share a healthy meal and they bask in a sense of togetherness.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

As word got around last year that a new restaurant called Redemption would open at the Mid-City address that had for so long been Christian's, it naturally kindled expectations, and even specific food cravings. Christian's was one of the few major restaurants that didn't return after Hurricane Katrina, and its setting, inside a century-old church, gave it an ambiance like nowhere else in town.

If you couldn't find someplace new and different to eat around New Orleans in 2011 it's probably your own fault. Certainly, our chefs and restaurateurs did their part this year to bring new options, new flavors and whole new concepts to the scene, and if you had a highly-specific craving in mind when setting out to sample them that was all the better.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

You might expect meatloaf at a pub, and the way things are going with the gastropub trend these days you might even expect a few high-brow touches along with it.

Still, I wasn't initially expecting one made of heritage cattle from a family-run ranch in New Iberia, nor that it would be slathered with foie gras butter, balanced on fried walnut bread, and served at the Irish House bar by the same guy who just took the two minutes necessary to properly draw off my Guinness pint.

"Place-based initiatives" is a big buzz phrase in philanthropy circles these days. It means taking a comprehensive approach to improving a neighborhood, considering how factors like jobs, education, transportation and housing all interact in a specific place. But even if you've never heard that term before, if you live in the New Orleans area, chances are you already know what it means.

Ian McNulty

It's the dishes with a bit of a drawl that jump off the menu at High Hat Café — the Delta-style tamales napped neatly in their cornhusks, a pimento cheese plate, homey sides of beans and greens and the restaurant's centerpiece, fried catfish with hushpuppies, a dish that's practically the fish and chips of cotton country.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

If some people out there still don't yet appreciate the heritage of our cuisine and the natural abundance that fuels it, I really wish they would get with the program already. After all, I don't think our region can stand another brutal lesson in just how much it all means.

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