Ian McNulty

Producer

Ian covers food culture and dining in New Orleans through his weekly commentary series Where Y’Eat. 

Ian is also a staff writer for the daily newspaper the New Orleans Advocate, covering the culture, personality and trends behind the city’s famous dining scene.

He is the author of two books - “Louisiana Rambles: Exploring America’s Cajun and Creole Heartland,” a travel narrative about south Louisiana culture, and “A Season of Night: New Orleans Life After Katrina,” an account of the first months in the city after Hurricane Katrina.

He has been a contributor to WWNO since 2009.

Courtesy of Tekrema.

From a vintage corner store in the Lower Ninth Ward, a community arts center is inspiring new ideas.

Greek Festival New Orleans

Traditional food prepared by devoted home cooks sets the table for a toga party on the bayou at Greek Fest.

St. Anna's Medical Mission

A New Orleans church with a long history takes its social justice efforts on the road, bringing health care access and education to widely diverse local communities.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

The "salt-baked" dishes at a Gretna Vietnamese restaurant are neither baked, nor particularly salty, but they sure are delicious.

Houma Regional Arts Council

How a regional arts council is helping return arts programming to schools in small coastal Louisiana communities.

In a town where crab cakes are sometimes touted as a meatless option, this weekend’s Veggie Fest strives to give the vegan lifestyle its due.

By harnessing the wealth of resources, skills and compassion in the community, one nonprofit is helping New Orleans students stay on track for success.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

High style, edible exotica and a disarmingly fun approach power a unique new restaurant in downtown New Orleans.

Ian McNulty

What happens when your top Jazz Fest picks are on the plate instead of on stage? One hungry fest fan finds out.

Boiled seafood is a tradition in Louisiana with many of its own rituals.
Ian McNulty / WWNO

A visit to one West Bank seafood specialist can feel like a mini road trip out to crawfish-producing Cajun country.

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