Ian McNulty

Producer

Ian covers food culture and dining in New Orleans through his weekly commentary series Where Y’Eat. 

Ian is also a staff writer for the daily newspaper the New Orleans Advocate, covering the culture, personality and trends behind the city’s famous dining scene.

He is the author of two books - “Louisiana Rambles: Exploring America’s Cajun and Creole Heartland,” a travel narrative about south Louisiana culture, and “A Season of Night: New Orleans Life After Katrina,” an account of the first months in the city after Hurricane Katrina.

He has been a contributor to WWNO since 2009.

In a town where crab cakes are sometimes touted as a meatless option, this weekend’s Veggie Fest strives to give the vegan lifestyle its due.

By harnessing the wealth of resources, skills and compassion in the community, one nonprofit is helping New Orleans students stay on track for success.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

High style, edible exotica and a disarmingly fun approach power a unique new restaurant in downtown New Orleans.

Ian McNulty

What happens when your top Jazz Fest picks are on the plate instead of on stage? One hungry fest fan finds out.

Boiled seafood is a tradition in Louisiana with many of its own rituals.
Ian McNulty / WWNO

A visit to one West Bank seafood specialist can feel like a mini road trip out to crawfish-producing Cajun country.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

The barroom setting and vegan approach is a little unorthodox, but the Korean flavors at the Wandering Buddha are easy to love.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

As interest in barbecue billows around New Orleans, the city is seeing a a wide range of regional styles take root and meld with local traditions.

The reputation New Orleans enjoys for great food has long carried the asterisk that this just isn’t a barbecue town. But things may be starting to change.

A Forecast of Food

Mar 15, 2012
Cabbages will be flying as St. Patrick's Day parades roll in New Orleans. Just watch your face!
File photo

Long before we thought much about food culture, learned to crave complex flavors or even did our own ordering at restaurants, many of us began to fantasize about food thanks to one enduring classic of a book, "Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs."

Ian McNulty

A category of café I call "Viet Orleanian" are run by Vietnamese people, specialize in New Orleans staples and, increasingly, are started to weave a little of their own native flavors into the mix too.

Pages