Eve Troeh

News Director

Eve Troeh is WWNO's News Director. In this role, Eve oversees the station’s expanding coverage of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana news stories, and develops New Orleans Public Radio's capability to report news of national significance for NPR.

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Louisiana State Museum

Each month Richard Campanella explores an aspect of New Orleans’ geography. His Cityscapes column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune shines a light on structural, often-overlooked or invisible aspects of the city. This month: a flood in 1849. Up until Katrina it was the largest deluge in the city’s history.

Campanella says that disaster 165 years ago had something in common with Katrina.

Eve Troeh / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

Jesse Hardman

This week Louisiana opened its inshore waters for shrimping. Boats around the state are heading out hoping for a big catch of brown shrimp in the bayous.

It’s a late start to the season, due to the long, cold winter, meaning less time for shrimpers to make money. But some good news for shrimp boat captains: prices are high.

In some cases, prices are double what they were last year. After years of setbacks, shrimpers could use a break.

Lissandra Melo / <a href="http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-121588291/stock-photo-locker-room.html?src=I5BauM-UKx4diJFZCV45vw-1-8">Shutterstock</a>

As the school year ends, education writer Sarah Carr sought a different approach to perspectives on schools.

She asked the students themselves to write opinion pieces on controversial topics: Discipline in schools, Teach for America teachers versus veteran educators, whether all students should go to a four-year college, and school desegregation.

Teenagers at the Bard Early College program submitted their thoughts, and The Hechinger Report has been publishing these essays.

Jesse Hardman

A year ago this week, the City of New Orleans was reeling — at a second line, on Mother’s Day, shots were fired into the crowd, striking 19 people. Another was trampled in the chaos.

Today on All Things New Orleans, we explore some issues brought about by the Mother’s Day shooting. We hear from one person shot at the second line, and his thoughts on any type of justice that might come from such an event.

New Orleans District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro explains a new approach to prosecuting violent crime.

Flickr user midnightpeace_90

WWNO continues its series “Behind the Test” with a look at test security. The paper booklets, and students’ answers inside, can determine things like teacher pay or the very existence of a school. It takes a lot of effort — and people — to keep the testing materials secure through delivery, administering the test, turning them in and then scoring.

The booklets and answer sheets for Louisiana’s LEAP tests come from a company called Data Recognition Corporation in Minnesota. When the Recovery School District's tests arrive they go straight to a warehouse.

Courtesy Richard Campanella

This month's Cityscapes column in NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune from geographer and author Richard Campanella details the geography of the Greek community in New Orleans. Most city residents would probably first think of Greek Fest, the annual festival held on the grounds of Holy Trinity Eastern Orthodox Church overlooking Bayou St. John. The congregation marks its 150th anniversary this year.

Eve Troeh

Sure there’s the music line-up at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival this weekend. But for some, the most important notes are savory, sweet or tart.

Each one of the food and drink booths at the festival is a stage all its own — with long hours of preparation and hard work to put on a good show. We looked behind the scenes at one staple item of Jazz Fest: Joyce's Lemonade.

Private Schools Losing Students Across Louisiana

Apr 29, 2014
Gerald Bernard / Shutterstock.com

The Louisiana school voucher system, called the Louisiana Scholarship Program, is growing — NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune reports about 12,000 students applied to use vouchers next school year.

Eve Troeh

Louisiana Highway 1, or just LA-1, is the longest continuous road in the state, running from the northeast corner down to Grand Isle. One particular stretch of it poses a particular challenge: as coastal erosion and sea level rise continue at rapid rates in southern Louisiana, LA-1 is more consistently flooded. This leaves residents and anyone who needs to travel the road inconvenienced at best, and in peril at worst.