Eve Troeh

News Director

Eve Troeh is WWNO's News Director. In this role, Eve oversees the station’s expanding coverage of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana news stories, and develops New Orleans Public Radio's capability to report news of national significance for NPR.

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Undeterred by the devastation, second line clubs returned to New Orleans a few months after the flood, determined to uphold the city's cultural traditions. This photo is of the 2009 Prince of Wales second line parade.
Jason Saul

Well, we’ve made it. Almost. It’s been a long, hot summer and this is our last episode as we come up on the tenth anniversary of Katrina.

The city is abuzz with journalists and experts and NGOs and politicians. We thought we’d use this last bit of The Debris to explore a word they’re all using to talk about New Orleans: resilience.

After being picked up from the curb, 'Katrina refrigerators' were hauled to landfills, stripped of rotted food and chemicals, and the metal and plastic were recycled.
Alice Welch / USDA

This week on Katrina: The Debris, we're exploring the actual debris — the stuff left behind when the winds died down and the floodwaters receded.

Katrina changed our relationship with that "stuff" — the tangible things that make up our modern lives. Some things became much more important, while so much else became just trash to be left on the curb for pickup.

Mallory Falk

Of all the changes New Orleans has seen in the ten years since Katrina, the restructuring of the city's public school system is perhaps the most drastic. In place of a traditional school district, most Orleans Parish schools are now governed by a loose confederation of charter operators. What does this new model mean for students, teachers and parents in New Orleans?

Kate Richardson / WWNO

New Orleans is a family city. Grandparents and grandkids, cousins, aunts and uncles often live in the same house, share the same traditions. When Katrina hit, many families evacuated together — three generations crammed into one car.

Photo of Gustave Blache III work / Flawlessentrprs

The root of the word “restaurant” is in fact the French verb restaurer​, to restore. And New Orleans restaurateurs, the proprietors, were seen as key figures in restoring the life and spirit of the city. But in those first months after the flood, nobody was sure how or even if the city's most famous restaurants were going to reopen. 

Bring New Orleans Back Commission / Urban Land Institute

The first comprehensive map for rebuilding New Orleans came out in early 2006, about six months after the flood. Saying it was highly anticipated would be an understatement. On it, some symbols that appeared as a death knell for some neighborhoods: green dots.

National Weather Service

Incredible by Modern Standards— June 1

New Orleans is a weather town. As hurricane season begins, hear the most emotional federal weather bulletin ever written. Plus, more on how the National Weather Service is using social science to improve forecasts. And hear from New Orleans residents who say the argument to call our 2005 disaster “The Federal Flood” instead of just “Katrina” still holds water. Why that weather wording matters.

Eve Troeh / WWNO

Crowds filled the Fairgrounds as the 46th annual New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival started its annual seven days of festing.

From a homegrown showcase for local talent, Jazz Fest has grown to include top national pop stars (which the festival officially calls “guest artists") alongside New Orleans' favorite jazz, blues, rock, gospel, hip hop, brass band and other talent. The nonprofit Jazz and Heritage Foundation has produced the festival in partnership with international production company AEG since 2004.

Cityscapes: Richard Campanella On A 7th Ward Puzzle

Apr 10, 2015
Nola.com/The Times-Picayune

Each month we talk with Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune. This month the Professor of Geography at the Tulane School of Architecture delves into a bizarre street pattern that pops up in the 7th Ward.

Seen from above, he says, this particular parcel of land and the way its streets intersect looks like the floor of a messy tailor's shop, scraps and remnants rather than any type of clear-cut pattern.

Jason Saul

Hear that?

It’s a pop, the sound of air rushing in. A thick, heady smell. Like when you open a vacuum-sealed pack of coffee and chicory.

Did you wince? So did we. But the seal has been broken on New Orleans clichés — in newsrooms across the city and, yes, the nation and presumably the world, journalists are staring down blank whiteboards with the headline: Ten-Year Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.

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