Eve Troeh

News Director

Eve Troeh is WWNO's first-ever News Director, hired to start the local news department in 2013. In this role, Eve assigns and edits the station’s expanding coverage of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana, including WWNO's Coastal Desk and education reporting. She edits the podcast and radio series "Tripod: New Orleans @300," and created, hosted and edited WWNO's Katrina +10 podcast and radio segment, "The Debris."  She also oversees special projects like community reporting tool "The Listening Post," and independent producer contributions like the Localore project "Unprisoned," and guides the newsroom in reporting stories of significance for national and international outlets. Follow on Twitter @evetroeh 

Ways to Connect

Courtesy: Center for Investigative Reporting

For several months, independent producer Eve Abrams, of Unprisoned, and WWNO news director Eve Troeh have been learning about and reporting on funding for public defense, and a drastic measure taken by the Orleans Parish Chief Public Defender this year.

The result: an hour-long collaboration with Reveal, from the Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX.

Listen here to "If You Can't Afford a Lawyer."

Or catch it on 89.9 WWNO Thursday, December 8 at 8 p.m. or Friday, December 9 at 1 p.m.

Richard Campanella

Each month Richard Campanella explores a different story of New Orleans' geography and architecture, with  WWNO News Director Eve Troeh.

After the sleek lines, steel and glass of Modern architecture was embraced by New Orleans in various forms from the 1920s to the early 1970s, it was firmly rejected as the century closed. Campanella chalks this up to sentiment about the city's economy, and its outlook for the future.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Eve Troeh/WWNO

It's been over 100 days since floodwaters rose up to the rooftops in parts of Baton Rouge, La. The so-called 1,000-year flood hit neighborhoods that had never seen such a disaster. But to some flood victims, it was all too familiar - those who moved to Baton Rouge from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina about a decade ago.

Cityscapes: How New Orleans Embraced The Modern

Nov 17, 2016
Courtesy NOPSI

Each month WWNO talks to Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column in Nola.com | The Times-Picayune. In a chronology exploring how various architectural styles swept the city, Modernism started its chapter in the 1920s. The ideas behind it, however, had roots in the 1800s.

MGN Julie Cardona

About 67 percent of Louisana's eligible voters turned out to cast ballots on Election Day. The state's eight electoral votes went to the Republican nominee, Donald Trump, as expected. This week's All Things New Orleans dives deeper into down-ballot races in Louisiana.

Kate Richardson

Right now, the Hispanic and Latino population in Baton Rouge is suffering with particular needs after the floods. Some of the problems are the same as those faced by Latino residents and workers after Katrina, and some are different. WWNO's "All Things New Orleans" asked Eduardo Courtade for insight on that situation, as well as other issues and events being talked about in the region's Spanish-speaking communities. He's Program Director for local stations Radio Tropical and La Fabulosa, which play music in addition to covering sports and news in Spanish.

Eve Troeh

This week on All Things New Orleans, we get into Cajun country rice fields with Tegan Wendland, for an update on ruined crops after the 2016 Louisiana floods. Public policy lawyer Jeffrey Thomas has made disaster a bigger part of his work after the levee failures of Katrina. He talks about the road ahead for long-term recovery and using federal funds to help flooded communities.

Eve Troeh

This week, as we mark another anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the levee breaches and floods, our minds turn to the tens of thousands of flood victims across south Louisiana. As they take first steps toward recovery, WWNO devotes this week's "All Things New Orleans" program to lessons learned, resources shared, and well wishes from our city to the deluged areas around Baton Rouge and Lafayette.

"It was wonderful to feel like I'd never have to be homeless again."

Myra Engrum is sitting in a McDonald's in Louisiana, steeling herself for another day of mucking out her flooded home. The parking lot is full of construction trucks and cars with a insurance company logos. A lot of meetings are happening here.

"I had over four and a half feet of water in my home, on the inside and outside," she says. "This is my first home that I ever purchased. I got the home right after Katrina."

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