Eve Abrams

Producer

Eve Abrams first fell in love with stories listening to her grandmother tell them; it’s been an addiction ever since.

Eve is a radio producer, writer, audio documentarian, and educator. Her work airs on WWNO, as well as on national programs such as the Tavis Smiley Show, Studio 360, The World, and This American Life. Her writing is published in the 2010 collection Where We Know: New Orleans as Home, as well as in Fourth Genre, Wesleyan Magazine, and the forthcoming New Orleans atlas, Unfathomable City. She is also the co-author of the book Preservation Hall.

Eve has taught in public and charter schools, both in New Orleans and New York City, and currently teaches writing at the Waldo Burton School and an audio workshop at Tulane University.

Eve Abrams

Orleans Public Education Network, OPEN, is committed to ensuring public engagement as a central element to building excellent public schools. Created in 2007, OPEN exists to serve as a catalyst and conduit for broad and diverse community engagement by facilitating more collaboration between community members, stakeholders, and policy makers.

Cyndi Nguyen and her son Sean are walking along the Borne Learning Trail in the Michoud Community in New Orleans East. 

“What shape is this?  Is this a rectangle?” Cyndi asks Sean.

“A diamond,” Sean answers.

Library of Congress

In certain worlds of New Orleans music, there is a special sound — a signal — which lets players know it's time to pick up their instruments and strike up the band. But where did this signal come from? We listened to chirps, whistles and musicians, hunting for this signal's origins and to learn: what is the chicken, and what is the egg?

When New Orleans musicians want to say a certain thing, instead of words, they use a four note phrase.  

“It’s a bugle call or a band call to assemble,” explains Leroy Jones.

Eve Abrmas

The Urban League’s Women’s Business Resource Center provides training, assistance and resources to aspiring and existing entrepreneurs. As an entrepreneur WBRC services can help improve your management skills, strengthen your enterprise, and increase your business’ capacity for success.

 

 

Gary Harrell is teaching a class called Empowering Communities One Entrepreneur at a Time at the Urban League’s Women’s Business Resource Center.

Eve Abrams / WWNO

New Orleans Works (NOW) is a workforce collaborative focused on building partnerships between employers, trainers, educators and workers to connect low-skilled workers to jobs that provide immediate economic security, and also prepare workers for professional growth and a focused career path.

 

Julia Pierce is a medical assistant at Ochsner Baptist Medical Center.

Eve Abrams

The mission of New Orleans Fatherhood Consortium is to develop comprehensive social supports, programs, public awareness, and policies that will assist fathers in reaching their fullest potential. It is a collaborative group of organizations and individuals who identify opportunities and support that enable fathers to be present, engaged and active in the lives of their families.

 

“It’s pretty common knowledge that children are born to two parents,” says Gregory Rattler, Jr., the director of New Orleans Fatherhood Consortium, which is based at Loyola University. 

Eve Abrams

The Broadmoor Development Corporation was created in 2006 by the Broadmoor Improvement Association to implement programs in response to the growing demand for housing advocacy and rehabilitation in the aftermath of the 2005 storms. Their mission is to enhance the economic wellbeing of the Broadmoor neighborhood.

 

Standing in Broadmoor, with a view of the Superdome in the distance and the Andrew Wilson Charter School across the street, is a newly renovated home ready to be rented.

Eve Abrams

Since 1896, Family Service of Greater New Orleans has offered an array of mental health counseling, psycho-educational and social service programs in the community, clients’ homes, and schools. It recently added a class called NOLA Dads to its long roster of services.

Lawrence is a father. A new father. He’s 22 years old, and his daughter, La’Naya, is one year old. He likes to tell her things.

Eve Abrams / WWNO

Linda Stone is the director of local office of Global Green USA. Jeff Supak works for Global Green on wetlands and water issues. The two give us a tour of the group's Holy Cross Project in the Lower 9th Ward dedicated to sustainable living in New Orleans.

“This is Global Green’s showcase sustainable village,” explains Stone. “We’re in the Holy Cross neighborhood, and we’re right next to the river, as you can see.”

Jonathan Traviesa

Over the course of 2013, I interviewed dozens and dozens of folks who live, or once lived, in the neighborhoods along both sides of St. Claude Avenue, roughly from St. Bernard to Poland Avenue. I asked them to share stories of their neighborhoods, what they’re like now, how they’ve changed, and how they feel about those changes. These voices became the makings of this seven-part radio documentary: Along Saint Claude.

Part 2: A Brief History Lesson

Jonathan Traviesa

Over the course of 2013, I interviewed dozens and dozens of folks who live, or once lived, in the neighborhoods along both sides of St. Claude Avenue, roughly from St. Bernard to Poland Avenue. I asked them to share stories of their neighborhoods, what they’re like now, how they’ve changed, and how they feel about those changes. These voices became the makings of this seven-part radio documentary: Along Saint Claude.

Part 1: What's in a Name

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