Eve Abrams


Eve Abrams first fell in love with stories listening to her grandmother tell them; it’s been an addiction ever since.

Eve is a radio producer, writer, audio documentarian, and educator. Her work airs on WWNO, as well as on national programs such as the Tavis Smiley Show, Studio 360, The World, and This American Life. Her writing is published in the 2010 collection Where We Know: New Orleans as Home, as well as in Fourth Genre, Wesleyan Magazine, and the forthcoming New Orleans atlas, Unfathomable City. She is also the co-author of the book Preservation Hall.

Eve has taught in public and charter schools, both in New Orleans and New York City, and currently teaches writing at the Waldo Burton School and an audio workshop at Tulane University.

Eve Abrams / WWNO

Edible Schoolyard New Orleans works to empower generations of New Orleans children to build and maintain healthy relationships with food, the natural world, themselves and their community.

Stefin Pasternak, is the lead chef educator at Samuel L Green Charter School, home of one of Edible Schoolyard’s two teaching kitchens, and one of their five school gardens. He directs two students to set the table for a communal meal.

Eve Abrams

The YMCA of Greater New Orleans is taking steps to reduce the burden of diabetes by offering a Diabetes Prevention Program, so that people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes don’t.

When you think YMCA, what comes to mind?

Volleyball, helping kids, swimming, gymnastics, the gym, the song.

Eve Abrams

Southeast Louisiana Legal Services helps people tackle civil legal issues for a stronger, safer, better life.

James Welch is a staff attorney at Southeast Louisiana Legal Services, and two days a week he works at a place called Single Stop.

“We have so many students who come in here when they just need a rest, a place to come where no one is snarling at them,” laughs Welch. “Unfortunately, it’s tough. This is like an oasis.”

Denny Culbert

Okay Louisiana: what’s the Cajun band that’s also psychedelic rock, or maybe even a little punk? Hint: they’re from Lafayette, they were started by two brothers 16 years ago, and they’re a huge force behind younger generations embracing Cajun culture. Still not sure? Think: roaming around slow moving water.

In collaboration with Louisiana Cultural Vistas, Eve Abrams brings us this profile of the Lost Bayou Ramblers.

Eve Abrams / WWNO

Since its formation in 2006, the Lower 9th Ward Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development has worked hard to advocate for a healthier, more sustainable Lower 9th Ward.

“We are in the Lower 9th Ward of New Orleans, Louisiana,” declares Arthur Johnson, CEO of the Lower 9th Ward Center for Sustainable Engagement and Development. “This is on the Holy Cross side. The river is right on my right. I can see the tall ships from here.  That’s how close we are to the river.

Paula Burch

There’s a joke that approximately 40 million Americans descend from Irish Immigrants, but on St. Patrick's Day, that number swells to 100 million.

In our latest collaboration with Louisiana Cultural Vistas, Eve Abrams leads us back to New Orleans’ first St. Patrick’s Day festivity and traces why, over 200 years later, we’re still celebrating come March 17.

New Orleans, we know, is a city made of layers. Historian Laura Kelley decided to peel off the Irish one. Why? She explains:

Eve Abrams

Carnival means costuming. And for many people, costuming means a visit to Jefferson Variety: the renowned emporium of fabric, feathers, glitter, trim and tassel.

Eve Abrams brings us this sound portrait of the place where Mardi Gras Indians, seamstresses, costumers and anyone in search of the perfect shade of bling finds the materials to make their Carnival visions come true. And in the spirit of Mardi Gras, a disclaimer: this story contains sensitive parts of female anatomy mentioned by name.

Andy Levin

Carnival is the season for flipping life on its head — a time when it’s natural to see people wearing wigs, boas, wings and beads. On Mardi Gras day, men dressed in suits made of feathers? Totally normal. And women dressed like little girls — in bloomers, short satin skirts and bonnets? Totally normal too, and part of a long, subversive tradition.

Eve Abrams shares this history of the Baby Dolls, who break race and gender barriers, all on a Mardi Gras day.

Kim Vaz is a dean at Xavier University. She literally wrote the book on Baby Dolls.

The sesquecentennial of the Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1965, with the remnants of Fazendeville visible in the background.
National Park Service

When Eldgridge Cager was growing up in Fazendeville in the 1950s, he and his friends would look for cannonballs, broken muskets and swords on the other side of the Mississippi River levee — just a few blocks from his house in the all-black community. They’d bring the rusty treasures to “Old Man” Linch, the Park Superintendent of the Chalmette Monument, a tall white obelisk towering over the cow pasture across from Fazendeville.

The youngsters called the monument “the Castle,” and in exchange for cannonballs the size of bowling balls, Linch let them run up the circular stairs, round and round to the very top. “We used to have races to see who gets up there the fastest,” recalls Cager. “I’m in my 60s now. I’ve tried to walk up there. Oh, boy.”

Greater New Orleans Housing Alliance

The Greater New Orleans Housing Alliance is a collaborative formed by the non-profit housing builders and community development corporations who are working diligently to rebuild the city of New Orleans.

“The Greater New Orleans Housing Alliance is a collaborative of non-profit, for-profit, builders and advocates of affordable housing here in the metro area,” says Andreanecia Morris. “We have been working together to create more affordable housing in New Orleans as we rebuild the city.”