Eve Abrams

Producer

Eve Abrams first fell in love with stories listening to her grandmother tell them; it’s been an addiction ever since.

Eve is a radio producer, writer, audio documentarian, and educator. Her work airs on WWNO, as well as on national programs such as the Tavis Smiley Show, Studio 360, The World, and This American Life. Her writing is published in the 2010 collection Where We Know: New Orleans as Home, as well as in Fourth Genre, Wesleyan Magazine, and the forthcoming New Orleans atlas, Unfathomable City. She is also the co-author of the book Preservation Hall.

Eve has taught in public and charter schools, both in New Orleans and New York City, and currently teaches writing at the Waldo Burton School and an audio workshop at Tulane University.

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Community
7:30 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Learning To Swim, And Providing The Opportunity, Often A Challenge In New Orleans

Kids wait to jump into the pool under the watchful eye of a NORDC lifeguard.
Credit NORDC

 

Some kids spend more of their summers in water than on land. Yet in our city, surrounded by water, knowing how to swim, or simply finding a place to swim, can be challenging.

Some kids spend more of their summers in water than on land. Yet in our city, surrounded by water, knowing how to swim, or simply finding a place to swim, can be challenging.

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Arts & Culture
12:48 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

What Would Your Map Of Jazz Fest Look Like?

Allyce Andrew WWNO

Helen Regis is a cultural anthropologist who has been studying the Jazz and Heritage Festival for 10 years. In some ways, she says, you can think of the Jazz Fest as a city.

“The people who build the festival every year — the construction crew, the electricians — feel like they’re building a city. They do. It’s this physical infrastructure. It has lights. It has plumbing. Sort of.” Regis says, in some ways, it’s kind of a fantasy city. "In some ways it looks like New Orleans, but it’s not."

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Arts & Culture
9:55 am
Tue April 30, 2013

Allison Miner's Spirit Lives On In The Jazz & Heritage Festival Stage Named For Her

Allison Miner.
Jazz and Heritage Archive

When the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival first began in 1969, it was radical. Here in the South, still reeling from the Civil Rights movement and race integration, the festivals’ founders — Quint Davis, George Wein, and Allison Miner — created a safe space for New Orleanians to come together, to hear each others’ music and to party — together. Eve Abrams brings us this profile of Allison Miner, a titan in New Orleans music, and the only person with a Jazz Fest stage named for her.

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Community
8:25 am
Fri March 1, 2013

People vs. Pets? Plans For City Dog Parks Draw Growls From Some Owners

Dogs tussle at Mickey Markey Park
Katy Reckdahl

If you own a dog in New Orleans, there are two places where your dog can legally run around off-leash: your yard and City Bark, the private dog park in City Park.

The New Orleans Recreation Development Commission wants to change that. NORD-C has selected two off-leash dog-runs for each district, but with city money tight there’s no telling when they’ll be built.

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Features
8:54 pm
Sun February 10, 2013

Marching Bands Battle Before Parades Roll

Justing Smothers is one of 17 trumpet players in Warren Easton's marching band.
Eugenia Uhl

High school marching bands have two main seasons: football and Carnival. But unlike football season, where bands briefly entertain sports fans during half time shows, Carnival season is a marathon of long songs, marching, and discipline. It’s also a time when the musicians, not the athletes, compete.

Eve Abrams visited two of New Orleans’ rival high school marching bands: MacDonough 35 and Warren Easton.

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Features
4:41 pm
Thu January 10, 2013

Growing Home Helps New Orleans Invest Millions to Landscape Vacant Land

Linda and Chester Blunt built several raised vegetable beds on their new lot.
Abigail Feldman

You see it in your neighborhood or on your way to work: an abandoned house or empty lot — a small piece of New Orleans which once belonged to someone, but now, is sagging or overgrown or both.

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Features
9:00 am
Fri December 14, 2012

Discovery of Human Remains Delays Iberville Redevelopment

Charmaine Williams goes for a walk with her grandchildren and daughter in the Iberville public housing development. Archaeologists have confirmed that part of the housing complex sits on an old cemetery, likely once part of St. Louis No. 1.
Scott Threlkeld The Advocate

The Housing Authority of New Orleans received a Federal grant last year to redevelop the Iberville Housing Development, the city’s last traditional public housing complex, on the edge of the French Quarter. The plan was to keep about a third of the buildings, demolish the rest, and build new, mixed-income housing.

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Features
6:54 pm
Tue December 11, 2012

Grow Dat Youth Farm Nurtures Leaders

Grow Dat Youth Farm.
Dacia Idom

When teenagers look for a job, they often seek skills and training just as much as money. But for kids growing up without abundant resources, opportunities for developing confidence, humility, and a good work ethic can be hard to come by. Yet one New Orleans program, the Grow Dat Youth Farm, provides all of this and more in one fell swoop.

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Features
5:49 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

State Public Service Commission Considers Lowering "Sinful" Prison Phone Rates

Louisiana prisons receive kickbacks from collect phone calls made by prisoners to their families.
Eve Abrams WWNO

When a prisoner calls home to talk to his mother, son, or daughter, that call costs his family about 15 times more than it would if the same number were dialed outside the prison walls.  These costs vary from one jail to the next, but every Louisiana prison receives a hefty kickback from the collect phone calls inmates make simply to stay in touch with their friends and families.

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All Things New Orleans
4:54 pm
Mon October 8, 2012

Hurricane Isaac Aftermath Raises Questions About Louisiana Citrus Farming Future

Satsumas from Becnel Farms' 2012 crop.
Eve Abrams WWNO

When Hurricane Isaac blew through Louisiana, it caused an estimated $100 million worth of losses in agriculture. About 40% of the state’s citrus crop was destroyed, and in Plaquemines Parish, where most of our citrus comes from, nearly half the citrus acres were flooded.

Farmers in the worst hit areas are cleaning up. Meanwhile, the luckier farmers worry about the next time. All of them told Eve Abrams the future of Louisiana’s commercial citrus industry does not look good.

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