Eve Abrams

Producer

Eve Abrams first fell in love with stories listening to her grandmother tell them; it’s been an addiction ever since.

Eve is a radio producer, writer, audio documentarian, and educator. Her work airs on WWNO, as well as on national programs such as the Tavis Smiley Show, Studio 360, The World, and This American Life. Her writing is published in the 2010 collection Where We Know: New Orleans as Home, as well as in Fourth Genre, Wesleyan Magazine, and the forthcoming New Orleans atlas, Unfathomable City. She is also the co-author of the book Preservation Hall.

Eve has taught in public and charter schools, both in New Orleans and New York City, and currently teaches writing at the Waldo Burton School and an audio workshop at Tulane University.

Eve Abrams

New Orleans has ten KIPP schools serving grades Kindergarten through 12th.. KIPP New Orleans also has a program called KIPP Through College, which supports KIPP middle school and high school alumni on their path to and through college.

Eve Abrams

Raintree House provides quality services to adolescent females between the ages of 10 to 17 years old who are in need of a therapeutic treatment program. Raintree House offers more restrictions than a foster home, but less restrictions than a residential facility or hospital. Raintree operates in conjunction with the the Department of Children and Family Services.

Eve Abrams

Grace House provides gender specific treatment to women who have become dependent on alcohol or drugs so that they may lead sober and productive lives.

Eve Abrams

The Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center was established in 1995 to eradicate housing discrimination in the Greater New Orleans area through education, investigation and enforcement. The Center is dedicated to fighting housing discrimination not only because it is illegal, but also because it is a divisive force that perpetuates poverty, segregation, ignorance, fear and hatred.

Eve Abrams

The New Orleans Family Justice Center Alliance is a partnership of agencies dedicating to ending family violence, child abuse, sexual assault and stalking by providing comprehensive client-centered empowerment services in a single location.

Eve Abrams

The Youth Development Program at Liberty’s Kitchen provides participants with occupational and employability skills training, and addresses the social issues that have created barriers to employment.

The objective of the Youth Development Program is to graduate students with a sense of purpose, tools and opportunities needed to thrive in gainful employment.

Eve Abrams / WWNO

Stand For Children educates and organizes parents, teachers and communities to demand excellent schools.

Up a flight of stairs in an airy meeting room overlooking Saint Claude Avenue, Dana Henry is getting ready for a gathering — the Orleans Parish parent endorsement committee training. It’s a get-together for parents to learn more about the Orleans Parish School Board: what it does, and who parents should back to be on it.

Eve Abrams

For 14 years, Gert Town Community Development Center has been instrumental in helping to enhance the total quality of life for residents in the Gert Town and surrounding community. They’ve advocated on behalf of issues of illegal dumping, education, blight and the return of recreational opportunities for youth and seniors.

courtesy of Henry Folse

In May, vandals defaced the new, gussied-up St Roch Market, spray-painting "YUPPIE = BAD" and breaking 

  all of the windows. And last month, when actor Wendell Pierce's plans for redeveloping a blighted property were rebuffed by the Faubourg Marigny Improvement Association, he tweeted, "Not hipster enough? Gentrification." The fear is that Post-K New Orleans is losing something essential -- something from Pre-K New Orleans. Eve Abrams examines what else we’re saying when we use these words.

Eve Abrams

Ten years after New Orleans flooded following Hurricane Katrina, the city has regained roughly 79 percent of its population. But that doesn’t mean it has 79 percent of the same people.

Much has changed about where New Orleanians live, but one of the biggest is that 97,000 fewer black people live in Orleans Parish than before the storm. It’s hard to pin down exactly where everyone went, but you can get a glimpse of why on one particular street corner. Eve Abrams investigats how who gets on the Megabus tells the story of New Orleans’ diaspora.

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