Eileen Fleming

News Reporter

Eileen is a news reporter and producer for WWNO. She researches, reports and produces the local daily news items. Eileen relocated to New Orleans in 2008 after working as a writer and producer with the Associated Press in Washington, D.C. for seven years.

Her prior experience includes five years in Belfast, Northern Ireland, where she freelanced stories for U.S. publications. She also worked as a part-time reporter for the Belfast Telegraph during the Clinton-era peace process.

Eileen grew up in the Boston area, and then moved to California where she worked at newspapers throughout the state. Eileen received her Bachelor of Arts in Journalism from Northeastern University.

New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin is reviewing the budget approved after a 12-hour City Council session. Whether he signs it isn't clear. The mayor wanted a tax increase to fill a $24 million budget shortfall. The council instead plugged much of the deficit with the city's disaster loans. Nagin calls the tactic a "financial train wreck."

The council has control of about half the $1.1 billion budget. Federal and state grants make up the rest.

Borders Books is about to open a new outlet in the former Bultman Funeral Home on St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans. It is a neighborhood where independent bookstores have thrived over the years.

As in many communities across the country, this opens a debate about the pros and cons of how national chains and local businesses compete.

Louisiana voters will be choosing a U.S. Senator. with incumbent Democrat Mary Landrieu facing off against Republican John Kennedy.

Democratic voters will be choosing a candidate in the Second District to face off next month in a general election.

Nearly two dozen water and urban planning experts from the Netherlands have been reviewing the system in the city of New Orleans. They've come up with some ambitious concepts outlined today at Tulane University.

The New Orleans City Council will be discussing a possible moratorium on demolishing properties considered by officials to be in danger of collapse.

The New Orleans City Council has been asked to keep up the pressure on the state's Road Home program. Members heard an update yesterday on what is — and isn't – happening with getting funds to people still working on recovery from Hurricane Katrina.

New Orleans Police Superintendent Warren Riley says his department performed well during Hurricane Gustav; he checked with the department's Public Integrity Division and no complaints have been filed against officers. He says officers will continue to concentrate on anti-looting measures. About 50 people have been arrested for multiple counts of looting, and the number of incidents is declining.

Mayor Ray Nagin is taking a look at how the city handled Hurricane Gustav, while keeping a close eye on the track of Hurricane Ike.

While people in New Orleans get back to their routines after Hurricane Gustav, some in the Louisiana National Guard have put their own recovery on hold while they pitch in where they're assigned.

Some members of the 141st Field Artillery unit took a break from setting up distribution points for people to pick up food and supplies to speak with WWNO. They had all been in Baghdad when Hurricane Katrina hit.

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