Corey Dade

Corey Dade is a national correspondent for the NPR Digital News team. With more than 15 years of journalism experience, he writes news analysis about federal policy, national politics, social trends, cultural issues and other topics for NPR.org.

Prior to NPR, Dade served as the Atlanta-based southern politics and economics reporter at The Wall Street Journal for five years. During that time he covered many of the nation's biggest news stories, including the BP oil spill, the Tiger Woods scandal and the 2008 presidential election, having traveled with the Obama and McCain campaigns. He also covered the 2007 Virginia Tech shootings and Hurricane Katrina, which led to a nine-month special assignment in New Orleans.

At the Journal, Dade also told the stories at the intersection of politics, culture and commerce, such as the Obama presidency's potential to reframe race in America and the battle between African-American and Dominican hair salons for control of the billion-dollar black consumer market.

Dade began his reporting career at The Miami Herald, writing about curbside newspaper racks and other controversies roiling the retirement town of Hallandale, Fla., pop. 30,000. He later covered local and state politics at the Detroit Free Press, The Boston Globe and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

No stranger to radio, over the years Dade has been a frequent guest commentator and analyst on NPR news, talk and information programs and on several cable TV networks.

As a student at Grambling State University in Louisiana, Dade played football for legendary coach Eddie Robinson. He then transferred to his eventual alma mater, the University of Maryland.

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U.S.
6:27 pm
Tue June 26, 2012

Future Murky For Arizona's Immigration Law

A defiant Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio answers questions about the Justice Department's lawsuit against him during a news conference in Phoenix last month.
Ross D. Franklin AP

As Arizona officials prepare to apply the one provision of the state's immigration law upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court, some local authorities doubt they can properly enforce it.

"We will do our best to enforce the law. But we are in uncharted territory on this issue," Tucson Police Chief Roberto Villasenor said in a statement released by the Police Executive Research Forum, a nonprofit organization of police chiefs. The group says the law "will seriously undermine local law enforcement."

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It's All Politics
5:10 pm
Fri June 15, 2012

President Obama's Immigration Shift Could Bolster Latino Support In November

Supporters of President Obama's announcement on immigration policy rally outside the White House Friday.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 3:00 pm

President Obama's decision to stop deporting young, otherwise law-abiding illegal immigrants could help rebuild his support among electorally important Latinos after 18 months of futile efforts, some activists said Friday.

"There is overwhelming support for the protection of these children, as there is in the rest of the country. I think this could have an energizing effect on Latino voters," says Clarissa Martinez del Castro, director of immigration and national campaigns for National Council of La Raza.

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It's All Politics
3:07 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

Fla. Gov. Rick Scott Defends Efforts To Clear Noncitizens From Voter Rolls

"Not one U.S. citizen has been eliminated from the voter rolls," Florida Gov. Rick Scott tells NPR's Michel Martin. "Not one."
Chris O'Meara AP

Originally published on Wed June 13, 2012 5:48 pm

Florida Gov. Rick Scott is defending his effort to prevent non-U.S. citizens from voting in his state after the Justice Department filed a lawsuit to stop him on Tuesday.

Scott told NPR's Michel Martin on Tell Me More Wednesday that after learning his state didn't verify the citizenship status of registered voters, he's trying to ensure that the ballots of U.S. citizens aren't diminished:

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It's All Politics
5:38 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

Obama's Deportation Policies Have Failed, Immigrant Advocates Say

Audience members listen to President Obama speak about immigration reform in El Paso, Texas, in May 2011. The Obama campaign is wooing Hispanics ahead of the November elections, but the president's deportation policy is being criticized by immigrant advocates.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 7:16 pm

Criticism of the Obama administration's deportation policies continues to pour in as previously supportive groups called the latest government effort a failure.

Immigrant advocates on Monday condemned the administration's recent findings that a policy designed to reduce the deportations of otherwise law-abiding illegal immigrants has had almost no effect.

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It's All Politics
2:32 pm
Sat June 2, 2012

Battles Over Voter ID Laws Intensify

Attorney General Eric Holder addresses the Congressional Black Caucus Faith Leaders Summit and National Black Churches Annual Consultation on Wednesday in Washington.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

As both parties turn to the general election, and the potentially pivotal role of minority voters, battles over voter identification and other new state election laws are intensifying.

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It's All Politics
7:36 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

After Cory Booker's Remarks, Press Aide Resigns

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 7:41 am

Perhaps Newark, N.J., Mayor Cory Booker's gaffe on NBC's Meet the Press has caused collateral damage, with the resignation Tuesday of his communications director.

The aide, Ann Torres, insists her departure isn't related to the mayor's remarks, or his subsequent clumsy backpedal, saying on Twitter that such rumors are "ridiculous...come on folks."

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It's All Politics
4:46 pm
Sun May 27, 2012

Polls Show Obama's Support For Gay Marriage Influencing Blacks

President Obama is seen on a monitor in the White House briefing room May 9. In an interview with ABC, he said he supports gay marriage.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 10:27 am

In this space earlier this month, I wrote about whether President Obama would face a backlash from African-Americans for his endorsement of same-sex marriage. (He hasn't.) I made mention of a random field experiment in which 285 black people in Cook County, Ill., were polled about gay marriage.

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It's All Politics
3:56 pm
Wed May 23, 2012

Romney Pivots To Education Platform In Seeking Latino Votes

Mitt Romney speaks at the Latino Coalition annual economic summit Wednesday in Washington, D.C.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 3:39 pm

Declaring that a "national emergency" exists in public education, presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney shifted from his usual economic message to outline his education platform during a speech to a Latino business group Wednesday.

Romney pledged to provide federal funding for "every" child from low-income families, or those with special needs, to attend the public, public charter or, in some cases, private school of their parents' choice. The proposals are boilerplate Republican Party planks.

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U.S.
5:26 pm
Tue May 22, 2012

Blacks, Gays And The Church: A Complex Relationship

The Apostolic Tabernacle Mass Choir performs in Oakland, Calif., in 2010.
Christopher Polk WireImage via Getty Image

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 6:14 pm

Fairly or not, African-Americans have become the public face of resistance to same-sex marriage, owing to their religious beliefs and the outspoken opposition of many black pastors.

Yet the presence of gays and lesbians in black churches is common. And the fact that they often hold leadership positions in their congregations is the worst kept secret in black America.

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Around the Nation
2:36 pm
Fri May 18, 2012

Will Population Shifts Alter Immigration Debate?

Hispanic residents walk by a law office in Union City, N.J., specializing in immigration in March. Union City is one of the state's largest cities, and has a Hispanic population of more than 80 percent.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court's expected ruling in June on Arizona's immigration law will set the blueprint for states where many officials say they face a crisis in trying to crack down on rising numbers of illegal residents.

Yet population changes and various research indicate that the great flow primarily of Latino illegal immigrants, which lasted at least two decades, ended several years ago.

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