Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who works with NPR's Morning Edition and Digital Media group. In addition to coordinating Web features, he frequently contributes to NPR's blogs, from The Two Way and All Tech Considered to The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to leading the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell trains both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between departments. Other shows he has worked with include All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and Talk of the Nation.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, as well as editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division. He also worked at the network's video and research library.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as editor-in-chief of The Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Sat March 29, 2014

NCAA's Elite 8 Is Set; A Listing Of Weekend Games

Michigan's Caris LeVert (left) gets a shot past Tennessee's Jarnell Stokes (No. 5) and Jordan McRae (No. 52) in Friday night's NCAA Midwest Regional semifinal. Michigan advanced despite being outscored in the second half.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 8:18 pm

Kentucky came back to beat defending champ Louisville, and Michigan State upset Virginia Friday night, as the NCAA men's basketball championship finalized its Elite Eight lineup.

Those teams were joined by Michigan, which held off a second-half comeback by Tennessee, and Connecticut, which took out Iowa State. Four other schools had already advanced after Thursday's games.

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The Two-Way
10:18 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

David Brenner Dies; The Comedian Was 78

Comedian David Brenner, a staple of TV in the 1970s and '80s, has died at age 78. He's seen here hosting his Nightlife show, with musician Frank Zappa (center) and his children, Dweezil (left) and Moon Unit.
David Bookstaver AP

Originally published on Sun March 16, 2014 10:53 am

Comedian David Brenner has died at age 78. A favorite guest of Johnny Carson's on the Tonight Show in the 1970s and '80s, the lanky comedian was famous for balancing his wry jokes with a toothy smile. Brenner had been battling cancer.

When he introduced Brenner as a guest for the first time, Carson described him this way: "He's very clever. Somewhat warped. Which is — if you're going to do comedy, you should be a little bit warped, I think."

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The Two-Way
5:26 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Interior Secretary: 1 Percent Of Wildfires Take 30 Percent Of Funds

A U.S. Forest Service photo shows firefighters near the perimeter of the Elk Complex fire near Pine, Idaho, last summer. Lawmakers are calling for a change in the way America pays for wildfire disasters.
AP

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 5:44 pm

Western lawmakers and Interior Secretary Sally Jewell urge changes to the way America pays to fight and recover from wildfires, starting with preserving money that's meant for fire prevention. They met with fire officials Monday who predicted a busy fire season for much of the West.

NPR's Nathan Rott reports for our Newscast unit:

"Secretary Jewell says her department and the U.S. Forest Service spend more than $3 billion annually fighting fires. A third of that is spent on megafires, the biggest 1 percent of any season's blazes.

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The Two-Way
4:12 pm
Mon March 17, 2014

Army General Pleads Guilty To Adultery; Other Charges Dropped

Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Sinclair (L) leaves the Fort Bragg Courthouse with his attorney Ellen Brotman, after sexual assault charges against Sinclair were dropped after he pleaded guilty to lesser charges Monday.
Davis Turner Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 7:17 am

Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Sinclair, who was accused of sexually assaulting a subordinate, has pleaded guilty to lesser charges in a plea deal reached with government prosecutors. A judge accepted the plea deal Monday; the general's sentencing hearing will continue Tuesday.

NPR's Tom Bowman reports for our Newscast unit that the prosecution's case against Sinclair, 51, fell apart because of missteps by the Army command and credibility problems with his accuser:

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The Two-Way
11:41 am
Mon March 17, 2014

Attorneys General Ask Big Retailers To Pull Tobacco From Stores

CVS announced last month that it would no longer sell cigarettes and tobacco products in its stores beginning Oct. 1.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 12:53 pm

Attorneys general from 28 states are urging drugstores and large retailers to stop selling tobacco products. In letters sent to Kroger, Wal-Mart, and other store chains, the officials ask companies to follow the example of pharmacy chain CVS, which announced last month that it's going to stop selling tobacco products.

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The Two-Way
10:15 am
Mon March 17, 2014

Westboro Baptist Will Find Justification To Continue, Pastor's Son Says

Westboro Baptist Church founder Fred Phelps' followers believe "they're not going to feel the sting of death," one of his sons says. Phelps, who's now in hospice care, is seen here at the Topeka, Kan., church in 2006.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 10:44 am

Westboro Baptist Church founder Rev. Fred Phelps Sr. is in hospice care and near death, according to family and church members say. His estranged son says the longtime pastor's passing would put his followers in a crisis, because the church's members "think that death is a judgment from God."

"So far, that illusion has held because none of them has passed," Nathan Phelps continues in an interview with The Topeka Capital-Journal.

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The Two-Way
4:53 pm
Sun March 16, 2014

Bill That Bans Undercover Filming At Farms Enacted In Idaho

Dairy cows feed through a fence at an Idaho farm, in this 2009 file photo. Idaho's Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter enacted a bill Friday that criminalizes the act of secretly filming animal abuse at farms.
Charlie Litchfield AP

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 7:41 pm

Idaho's Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter has signed a bill that criminalizes the act of secretly filming animal abuse at agricultural facilities. The move comes days after the state's legislature approved the measure.

"Otter, a rancher, said the measure promoted by the dairy industry 'is about agriculture producers being secure in their property and their livelihood,'" according to the AP.

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The Two-Way
4:10 pm
Sun March 16, 2014

House Approves Anti-Regulatory Bills, With Eye On Elections

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 8:37 am

The House of Representatives has approved several bills that would limit and change the way the federal government regulates businesses. The Republican-backed measures were all passed by largely party-line votes; none are seen as likely to be enacted into law.

The legislation underscores "an increasingly symbolic thrust of legislation as Congress heads toward midterm elections," NPR's David Welna reports for our Newscast unit.

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The Two-Way
4:06 pm
Sun March 16, 2014

Westboro Baptist Founder Is 'On The Edge Of Death,' Son Says

Westboro Baptist Church founder Fred Phelps is reportedly in hospice care in Topeka, Kan. Members of the church protest outside the gates at Fort Campbell, Ky., in this 2006 photo.
Christopher Berkey AP

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 7:16 am

The Rev. Fred Phelps Sr., founder of the Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka, Kan., that became famous for its controversial protests at funerals, is ill and in hospice care, family members and church officials confirmed today.

Phelps' estranged son, Nathan, first announced his father's condition Saturday night.

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The Two-Way
3:35 pm
Sun March 16, 2014

Mapping Differences In America's Musical Tastes, State By State

A map of the U.S. lists the musical acts that set states apart from each other. It's not a matter of an artist's popularity, says Paul Lamere, who made the map, but of a state's distinct preferences.
Paul Lamere, Director of Developer Platform at The Echo Nest

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 12:24 pm

Are you streaming music right now? If you're in America's Pacific region, there's a much better chance you're nodding along with Cat Power rather than grooving to Fantasia, which you'd be more likely to be doing if you were across the country in the South Atlantic. Those observations come from a map titled "Regionalisms in U.S. Listening Preferences."

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