Associated Press

The state's largest utility needs to come up with more power before the end of 2016.

And it needs to find even more by the end of 2019 to meet the demands of Louisiana's ongoing industrial boom.

That likely means building power plants for about $1 billion a piece. The 1 million customers of Entergy’s Louisiana companies will be expected to pay.

The Advocate reports Entergy is spending a couple of billion dollars over the next few years to move huge amounts of electricity to where the new manufacturing facilities will be located.

It’s a bit of a blue Christmas in New Iberia.

Some people are complaining that the city’s Christmas lights are too subdued this year.

But the blue lights lining trees, store windows and other decorations on Main Street are a memorial to a home-town artist — George Rodrigue. His blue dog paintings became internationally famous.

Rodrigue died a year ago.

Phyllis Mata of the Magic on Main committee tells The Daily Iberian that the change from white lights is temporary.

New Orleans police now say that only about half of more than 400 untested rape kits may need testing.

Police Superintendent Michael Harrison said over the weekend that the department is storing 220 of 429 kits. Most of the stored kits are from people who got tested by medical personnel but declined to press charges.

The untested rape kits were disclosed during a New Orleans City Council hearing last week on failings in the department's handling of rape and child abuse cases.

Governor Bobby Jindal is getting lawmakers’ support for his plan to use patchwork financing and modest cuts to close a $170 million budget deficit.

The House and Senate budget committees backed the proposal without objection yesterday. It comes only days before the budget had to be rebalanced to avoid a special session.

Minor changes were made to Jindal’s plan submitted last month. Financing sources were swapped. Agriculture department job cuts were scrapped. A cut to road maintenance work was eliminated.

bird flew / Flickr

The Biloxi City Council is considering an ordinance, based on a similar ordinance used in New Orleans, that would protect people riding on floats and marching in parades from throw-backs by spectators.

The Sun Herald reports a first reading of an ordinance came Tuesday without comment. Council President Kenny Glavan later said that he's had a couple of krewes ask for the protection.

The ordinance says people sometimes throw beads and other items back on the floats where participants are occupied, potentially injuring them.

It was an abrupt reversal of fortune that stirred lingering resentment and fresh tears more than nine years after Hurricane Katrina: Louisiana’s Supreme Court overturned rulings from two lower courts and tossed out a lawsuit that said roughly 7,500 New Orleans public school employees were wrongfully fired after levee failures during the 2005 storm led to inundation of the city.

National Park Service / Wikimedia

Scores of endangered turtles hurt by the unusual cold in Massachusetts have been brought to the Gulf Coast to be rehabilitated and eventually released into the wild.

Hundreds of cold-stunned young Kemp's ridley sea turtles have washed up on Massachusetts beaches since November. The condition, like human hypothermia, can be fatal.

The Audubon Aquarium of the Americas in New Orleans says it received 27 of the turtles on Monday. Institute for Marine Mammal Studies director Moby Solangi says 32 are in Gulfport.

The Pentagon says three Louisiana companies have contracts worth up to $200 million in total to armor levees in the New Orleans area.

The Pentagon says Bis Services of Kenner, Circle of Belle Chasse, and Shavers-Whittle Construction of Mandeville, were among 10 companies that bid over the Internet.

Their contracts are with the Army Corps of Engineers in New Orleans. They were on a list of contracts released last night by the Pentagon.

The work is to be done by December 2020. The amount paid for each job will be decided individually.

Republican Louisiana Senator David Vitter says he has been appointed to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

The assignment sets him in the middle of what likely will become major disagreements in the next Congress.

Those include fights over President Obama's nominee for the attorney general, and the president's immigration plan to help those living in the United States illegally.

Almost half of Louisiana students are missing out on millions of dollars of federal financial aid that could help them get skills training or college degrees after high school.

Education Superintendent John White said yesterday that only 44 percent of Louisiana's public high school seniors fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid.

That application is used to determine if students are eligible for Pell grants, work study programs and other types of aid.

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