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The Picture Show
12:07 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

The Visual South, Part II: Photography Is Like Chicken

"Letter Never Sent" is Hamrick's most recent hand-bound series. "The viewer has an intimate relationship with the book by holding it, feeling its textures and turning its pages, instead of just standing across the room staring at it," he says.
Frank Hamrick

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:48 am

The current issue of Oxford American magazine, known as "the Southern magazine of good writing," is nicknamed the "Visual South Issue." In its 100 under 100 list, the magazine identifies "the most talented and thrilling up-and-coming artists in the South." This week, we'll take a look at five of the photographers on that list.

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The Two-Way
11:43 am
Tue May 8, 2012

GOP Senators Block Democrats' Student Loan Bill

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 2:22 pm

Senate Republicans gave a thumbs down to a Democratic plan that would have frozen interest rates for 7.4 million students taking out new federally subsidized Stafford loans.

The vote was 52-45. Sixty votes were needed to avoid a certain Republican filibuster and to move the bill toward debate.

From the Republican perspective, it wasn't the idea of keeping the rate at 3.4 percent rather than letting it double starting in July. The impasse was over how to fund the one-year rate freeze, which would cost the government $6 billion, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

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The Two-Way
11:38 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Labor Department: Employers Advertising More Jobs

Another piece of data to fit into a confusing employment jigsaw puzzle: this time, it's advertising for new jobs – U.S. companies in March posted the highest number of those in four years.

The Labor Department says some 3.74 million job openings were advertised for the month, the most since July 2008, about six months after the recession officially began but still just ahead of the financial meltdown.

What does it mean?

If you're an optimist, it means employers are feeling a bit more "robust" about the economy and want to add workers.

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The Two-Way
11:24 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Albanian Who Tried To Help Bring Down Mobster Gets Asylum In U.S.

An Albanian man who more than a decade ago agreed to help the U.S. Justice build a case against a mobster accused of human smuggling has finally won his long-sought quest for asylum in the U.S.

Edmond Demiraj, his wife and adult son have been granted full asylum, NPR's Carrie Johnson reports.

As Carrie reported last year:

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The Two-Way
11:05 am
Tue May 8, 2012

What's Your Favorite Sendak Memory?

'Where the Wild Things Are' by Maurice Sendak.
NPR

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 11:30 am

The death of children's author Maurice Sendak has brought back many memories for many of us.

This blogger remembers nephew Ben reading Where the Wild Things Are back in the late '60s and being fascinated by what seemed to be a very different, much more interesting, kind of book than I'd been used to as a kid just a few years before.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
10:55 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Avenging Reality: Building The Awesome Universe In Fact and Fiction

Thor (Chris Hemsworth, left) and Captain America (Chris Evans) join up with Iron Man and the Hulk to save the Earth in The Avengers.
Walt Disney Pictures

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 4:34 pm

Way back in 1992, the great saxophonist Branford Marsalis was trying to explain to an interviewer how jazz improvisation always works within constraints. "There's only freedom in structure, my man," he said. "There's no freedom in freedom." Now it might seem like a stretch to some of you, but I think Marsalis' point holds just as true for the great new Avengers movie as it does to Bebop.

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Energy
10:52 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Falling Oil Prices: A Blip Or A Hint Of The Future?

Oil and gas production in the U.S. is rising, and the U.S. is expected to be less dependent on foreign energy in the coming years. This oil drilling rig, shown in October 2011, is outside Watford City, N.D., a state that has seen a boom in energy production.
Matthew Staver Landov

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 2:42 pm

World oil prices have been falling recently — and that's good news for oil consumers such as the U.S., Europe and China, and a potential challenge for the big exporters like Saudi Arabia and Russia.

The oil market is notoriously volatile, and the factors driving prices down are temporary. But some energy industry analysts are posing a much larger question: Is the world, and the U.S. in particular, entering a new phase of expanding energy supplies and more moderate prices?

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NPR Story
10:38 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Remembering Children's Book Author Maurice Sendak

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 1:13 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally today, we want to honor someone who's work fired the imaginations of many children and their parents. Award-winning author and illustrator Maurice Sendak died today at the age of 83.

Maurice Sendak is best known for that classic children's book "Where the Wild Things Are." He wrote and illustrated the story of the mischievous hero Max, who gets sent to bed without dinner and his imagination takes him to a land of colorful giant monsters.

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NPR Story
10:38 am
Tue May 8, 2012

When The Political Becomes Very Personal

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 1:13 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we know that minorities have been hard hit by the effects of the recession in everything from employment to foreclosure rates. There's a new office within the agency that's been charged with looking out for consumers that's supposed to take a look at how financial practices affect minorities and women. We'll speak with the new head of that office in just a few minutes.

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NPR Story
10:38 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Can Mo' Money Really Mean Mo' Problems?

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 1:13 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We turn now from consumer protection to personal finance. It's been weeks since that huge lottery jackpot made just a few people millionaires and left many of the rest of us with worthless tickets stuffed in our junk drawers. But if the disappointment of not being a few hundred million dollars richer is still on your mind, this conversation is for you.

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