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Deceptive Cadence
8:18 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

Can You Learn To Like Music You Hate?

Harmony — it's in the ear of the beholder, Australian researchers say.
iStock

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 6:23 pm

You hear some music you hate. That's fair. We all do on occasion. But can you learn to love — or at least not loathe — that music? Can you intentionally transform the visceral response you have to certain pieces and styles, or does that happen at some more incalculable, subtle level?

Researchers at Australia's University of Melbourne say that the more dissonance (which they describe as "perceived roughness, harshness, unpleasantness, or difficulty in listening to the sound") that we hear in music, the less we enjoy said music. Seems obvious enough, right?

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Song Travels
8:18 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

Aaron Neville On 'Song Travels'

Aaron Neville.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 12:55 pm

Aaron Neville has been a radio mainstay for more than five decades. Coming from a musical family in New Orleans, he got his start singing with The Neville Brothers and had his first No. 1 R&B hit in 1966 with "Tell It Like It Is."

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From Scratch
8:17 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

Mick Mountz, Founder Of KIVA Systems

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:03 pm

Jessica Harris speaks with Mick Mountz, founder of KIVA Systems, a mobile robotics company that automates the warehouse fulfillment process. He will talk about how he started his company. Later, we'll also heard form sculptor Andrew Goldsworthy.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This Is NPR
8:17 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

NPR In The News: The Traveler Edition

Screen shot of Ask Me Another Puzzle Guru Art Chung on Bloomberg TV.
screen shot of Bloomberg TV

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 8:48 am

NPR headquarters may be in Washington, D.C., but we've got correspondents, shows and coverage happening across the country and around the world. Here's a snapshot of how our journalists and reporting are making news cycles recently from LA to Austin and up the East Coast.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
8:17 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

Investigations Of Experience

The Berlin-Potsdam Railway (1847) by Adolph Menzel
Joerg P. Anders bpk Berlin/Alte Nationalgalerie/Art Resource

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:21 pm

The painter Adolph Menzel (1815-1905) is not well-known, even in his native Germany. He was tiny and ugly and never married; he wrote in his will that "there is a lack of any kind of self-made bond between me and the outside world." Perhaps this lack of bond is what made it possible for him to devote himself so totally to the task of making pictures.

Menzel drew constantly. He drew everything. He drew with his left hand and with his right. He drew on napkins and on the backs of menus. No social event was so formal, or so intimate, it seems, as to quiet his active hands.

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Shots - Health News
8:17 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

Don't Count On Extra Weight To Help You In Old Age

Extra weight is no defense against aging, says a demographer who argues that the apparent benefits from being overweight are a mirage.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 8:47 am

Wouldn't it be great, considering how many of us are overweight, if carrying a few extra pounds meant we'd live longer?

A recent analysis of nearly 100 published studies involving almost 3 million people found, surprisingly, that being a little overweight was associated with a lower risk of death than having a normal weight or being obese.

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The Record
8:17 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

A Brief History Of The Grammy Sales Bump

Marcus Mumford of Mumford & Sons, winner of Album of the Year at the 2013 Grammy Awards. To date, the band's winning album, Babel, has sold 1,737,000 copies, according to Nielsen Soundscan.
Jason Merritt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 4:21 pm

As televised prize-givers, the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences are slouches. The dozen prizes given out in a typical Grammy Awards telecast is the lowest of any major awards-show telecast, from the Oscars to the Emmys. NARAS gives out the bulk of its little gramophones in an untelevised ceremony.

But as sales-juicers? The Grammys are unparalleled.

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The Salt
8:16 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

How To Make A Chinese New Year-Worthy Potsticker

The finished dumplings, properly fried to a light crisp. The half-moon shape was meant to resemble ancient Chinese currency. Eating the dumplings was believed to bring fortune and prosperity.
Daniel M.N. Turner NPR

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 1:59 pm

Even though he estimates he's made hundreds of thousands of them, Scott Drewno says pork potstickers never get old. In fact, they are the food the executive chef of The Source by Wolfgang Puck, a fine dining Asian fusion restaurant in Washington, D.C., says he would take to a desert island.

"They're everything you want in a dish — salty, savory, filling," says Drewno, as he lovingly holds up one of three bowls of ground pork he planned to season and stuff into dumplings before our eyes.

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The Two-Way
8:16 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

After Outrage, Benjamin Netanyahu's Ice Cream Budget Melts Away

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu heads the weekly cabinet meeting in his office on February 10 in Jerusalem, Israel.
Uriel Sinai Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 8:42 am

It is perhaps one of the more frivolous stories out of the Middle East; still, it's tasty, so we'll tell you about it: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has angered his opponents by budgeting 10,000 Shekels ($2,716) to buy ice cream for his household.

As The Guardian reports, the news came at an inconvenient time for Netanyahu's coalition government: They had just proposed an austerity budget that cut benefits for public workers.

The Guardian adds:

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The Checkout: Live
8:16 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

Orrin Evans: Live From 92Y Tribeca

Pianist Orrin Evans performs at 92Y Tribeca as part of WBGO's The Checkout Live concert series.
John Rogers johnrogersnyc.com

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 10:12 am

The pianist Orrin Evans splits much of his time between Philadelphia, where he grew up, and New York, a much larger jazz scene where he gigs often. A hard-charging player, seasoned with the harmonic touch of fellow Philadelphian McCoy Tyner, Evans is in high demand in a lot of places. Last year saw him release his 19th album as a bandleader or co-leader, Flip the Script. It's a trio recording, a format which both intimidates and excites him; here, he takes up the three-man challenge anew.

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