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The Two-Way
11:07 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Report Finds Commander Of U.S. Forces In Europe Violated Travel Regulations

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 6:00 pm

The Defense Department inspector general found that Adm. James Stavridis, the commander of all U.S. forces in Europe and the Supreme Allied Commander of NATO forces, violated travel regulations and accepted gifts from foreign governments without reporting them in a timely manner.

The AP reports that the IG found that "Stavridis never attempted to use his public office for private gain nor did he commit personal misconduct"

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The Two-Way
11:06 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Navy SEALs Disciplined For Role In Videogame

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 7:52 pm

Seven members of the elite Navy SEAL Team 6 have been punished for their role they played in the creation of the videogame Medal of Honor: Warfighter.

NPR's Tom Bowman reported on the charges Thursday for our Newscast Unit. Here's what he said:

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The Two-Way
11:06 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Iran Says It Shot At U.S. Drone, Because It Trespassed

In this Sept. 6, 2007 photo, an MQ-1 Predator unmanned aerial vehicle flies over a range in Nevada.
MSgt. Scott Reed AP

The Iranian defense minister confirmed today that his forces had shot a U.S. drone. But Brig. Gen. Ahmad Vahidi said it shot at the MQ1 Predator drone because it had trespassed into its airspace, The New York Times reports.

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NPR Story
11:02 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Oliver Sacks: Hallucinations

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 12:03 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman. In his new book "Hallucinations," Oliver Sacks writes that you see with your brain, not with your eyes. And his book suggests our brains can play some bizarre tricks on is. Dr. Sacks describes a musician who sees intricate but unplayable sheet music superimposed on his field of vision.

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NPR Story
11:02 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Hurricane Sandy Claims Thousands of NYU Lab Mice

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 12:03 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman, filling in for Ira Flatow this week. Last week, when Hurricane Sandy sent a surge of salty water into cities and towns up and down the East Coast, among the casualties were thousands of research subjects: lab mice. A building at New York University's Medical Center flooded, and thousands of mice and rats that were being used to study cancer, heart disease and all kinds of other medical disorders died.

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NPR Story
11:02 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Scientists Solve Mystery of Earth's Shifting Poles

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 12:03 pm

Did you know that Earth's solid exterior can move around over its core, causing the planet's poles to wander back and forth? Adam Maloof, associate professor of geosciences at Princeton University, discusses the consequences of these shifts, and what may be causing them.

NPR Story
11:02 am
Fri November 9, 2012

With Budget Cuts Looming, Is Science A Lame Duck?

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 12:03 pm

If Congress fails to act, some $15 billion will be cut from science funding in January 2013. Physics professor and Beltway insider Michael Lubell talks about how science can escape that "fiscal cliff," and what to expect for climate change, healthcare and space under four more years of President Obama.

NPR Story
11:02 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Climate Change Takes Flight in New Novel

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 8:53 am

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

Here's a big, giant question for you: Why do we believe what we believe? And how is it that two people can look at the exact same set of circumstances and see two completely different things? That philosophical question is at the center of a new book where, to put it another way, one person's beautiful miracle is another person's ecological crisis.

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NPR Story
11:02 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Bioengineering Beer Foam

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 12:03 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

And one last salute to science before the weekend. Here are some news you can raise the glass to. Microbiologist Tomas Villa and colleagues report that they may be able to bioengineer better beer foam. That's right.

TOMAS G. VILLA: Beer foam. Foam is what you like the most in a beer. And a beer drinker wants foam to stay longer, right?

LICHTMAN: Of course. And the secret to long-lasting froth, proteins, produced by barley and yeast during fermentation.

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This Is NPR
11:00 am
Fri November 9, 2012

How Public Radio Scotch-Taped Its Way Into The Public Broadcasting Act

Frank Wolfe LBJ Library photo

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 5:08 pm

Forty-five years ago this week, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967. Aligned with his vision for a Great Society, Johnson's signature on that legislation created the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, paving the way for the incorporation of National Public Radio, just a few years later.

In that historic document, approved by Congress and blessed by the president, the words "and radio" were literally Scotch-taped into the text following every mention of "television."

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