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Author Interviews
8:21 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

'Noble Savages': A Journey To Break The Mold Of Anthropology

Cover of Noble Savages

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 9:44 am

When Napoleon Chagnon first saw the isolated Yanomamo Indian tribes of the Amazon in 1964, it changed his life forever. A young anthropologist from the University of Michigan, he was starting on a journey that would last a lifetime, and take him from one of the most remote places on earth to an international controversy.

That controversy would divide his profession and impugn his reputation. Eventually he would come to redefine the nature of what it is to be human.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
8:20 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

Al Gore Plays Not My Job

Axel Schmidt AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 16, 2013 9:35 am

Since Al Gore's term as the 45th vice president of the United States ended in 2001, he has starred in an Oscar-winning documentary, won a Grammy Award and received the Nobel Peace Prize. But obviously he won't be satisfied until he wins the NPR news quiz, so we've invited him to play a game called "Maybe you can beat Bill Clinton at this."

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Favorite Sessions
8:19 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

Sidi Touré: Magic Music From Mali

Sidi Touré performed live at KEXP in Seattle.
Morgan Schuler KEXP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:23 am

Every day at KEXP, we're witnesses to the gifts of musicians from around the world. On one balmy day in Seattle, the bluesy, hypnotic spirit of Sidi Touré brought something extraordinary, as he offered an intimate look into the spiritual influences that guided the creation of Koïma, his newest album.

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The Picture Show
8:19 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

The March On Washington In Pictures

Photos from This Is the Day: The March on Washington, Aug. 28, 1963
Leonard Freed J. Paul Getty Museum

Originally published on Mon February 18, 2013 5:37 am

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, when Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his historic "I Have a Dream" speech. Documentary photojournalist Leonard Freed was one of the 200,000 people in the crowd that day. He died of prostate cancer in 2006, but a new book of his photos from that day, This Is The Day: The March On Washington, was released in February.

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Books
8:19 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

Uncovering A Dead Father's Secrets In 'After Visiting Friends'

peeterv iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 2:22 pm

Michael Hainey was 6 years old when his uncle came to his house and told him and his brother that their father was dead. Bob Hainey was just 35. He was the slot man — a high-pressure, high-profile position overnight on the Chicago Sun-Times, a newspaper that in 1970 was the quintessence of roustabout Chicago journalism. Bob Hainey had died of a heart attack on a North Side street, as one of the obits put it, "while visiting friends."

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Planet Money
8:19 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

Episode 436: If Economists Controlled The Borders

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 12:20 pm

For the first time in a while, there's political momentum building to change the U.S. immigration system. On today's show, we ask three economists: What would the perfect system look like? If we could scrap the mess of a system that we currently have and replace it with anything, what would it look like?

Among the answers:

  • Let in lots more doctors and engineers
  • Auction off immigration slots to the highest bidders
  • Open the gates, and let everyone in
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Deceptive Cadence
8:18 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

Can You Learn To Like Music You Hate?

Harmony — it's in the ear of the beholder, Australian researchers say.
iStock

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 6:23 pm

You hear some music you hate. That's fair. We all do on occasion. But can you learn to love — or at least not loathe — that music? Can you intentionally transform the visceral response you have to certain pieces and styles, or does that happen at some more incalculable, subtle level?

Researchers at Australia's University of Melbourne say that the more dissonance (which they describe as "perceived roughness, harshness, unpleasantness, or difficulty in listening to the sound") that we hear in music, the less we enjoy said music. Seems obvious enough, right?

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Song Travels
8:18 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

Aaron Neville On 'Song Travels'

Aaron Neville.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 12:55 pm

Aaron Neville has been a radio mainstay for more than five decades. Coming from a musical family in New Orleans, he got his start singing with The Neville Brothers and had his first No. 1 R&B hit in 1966 with "Tell It Like It Is."

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From Scratch
8:17 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

Mick Mountz, Founder Of KIVA Systems

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:03 pm

Jessica Harris speaks with Mick Mountz, founder of KIVA Systems, a mobile robotics company that automates the warehouse fulfillment process. He will talk about how he started his company. Later, we'll also heard form sculptor Andrew Goldsworthy.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This Is NPR
8:17 pm
Sat February 16, 2013

NPR In The News: The Traveler Edition

Screen shot of Ask Me Another Puzzle Guru Art Chung on Bloomberg TV.
screen shot of Bloomberg TV

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 8:48 am

NPR headquarters may be in Washington, D.C., but we've got correspondents, shows and coverage happening across the country and around the world. Here's a snapshot of how our journalists and reporting are making news cycles recently from LA to Austin and up the East Coast.

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