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Planet Money
12:33 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Household Debt In America, In 3 Graphs

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 7:38 pm

For more, see What America Owes In Student Loans

U.S. households owe a bit less than they did at the peak of the bubble. But they still owe a lot: $11.4 trillion, give or take a few billion. Mortgage and home-equity debt is still by far the biggest chunk of that debt.

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Shots - Health News
12:29 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Some Kids Bounce Straight To The Emergency Room

First the kids pile in, then the bouncing begins.
Nationwide Children's Hospital

If your kids absolutely must jump around at their next birthday party, an inflatable moonwalk or bounce house may be a safer bet than a backyard trampoline. But only a little safer.

The wildly popular mosh pits for the school-age set have become a common source of injuries that send kids to the hospital.

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Krulwich Wonders...
12:20 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Ferocious Flowers

A screen-grab from Andrew Zuckerman's Flower project.
Andrew Zuckerman Studio Vimeo

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 8:07 am

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The Two-Way
11:54 am
Mon November 26, 2012

In One Corner Of Syria, A Rebel Victory Results In Friction

A Syrian rebel fighter is shown in the northeastern Syrian border town of Ras al-Ayn on Nov. 11, several days after the rebels captured it. The rebel takeover has created friction with the town's Kurdish population.
Murad Seezer Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 5:49 pm

When Syrian rebels seized the border post at Ras al-Ayn on Nov. 8, they celebrated the victory and went on to "liberate" the town, a place where both Arabs and Kurds live on Syria's northeast border with Turkey.

But the Kurdish inhabitants quickly saw their "liberation" as a disaster. Within days, dozens were dead in clashes between Kurdish militias and the rebels.

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Monkey See
11:46 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Making The Comedy Podcast: Julie Klausner's Life Of Conversation

Julie Klausner has written for television, traditional media, new media, and Joan Rivers. But she's also a very popular comedy podcaster — a job that, only a few years ago, barely existed.
Ari Scott Julie Klausner

Originally published on Tue November 20, 2012 5:14 pm

Julie Klausner's podcast, How Was Your Week?, has been featured on all manner of lists of the best shows of its kind — in Rolling Stone, in GQ, and in The New York Times. Comedy podcasting is a field growing so fast that, as NPR's Audie Cornish mentions in talking to Klausner on today's All Things Considered, comedian Colin Quinn recently commented that the only thing comedians talk about anymore is doing each other's podcasts.

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Planet Money
11:46 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Ask A Banker: Are The Banks Still Too Big To Fail?

Paul Goyette Flickr

Originally published on Tue November 20, 2012 2:45 pm

Hi! I'm back again. I'm a former banker, now a writer at Dealbreaker and an answerer of real and imagined questions about the financial world here. You can send questions to planetmoney@npr.org with "ask a banker" in the subject line, or ask on Twitter (@planetmoney).

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This Is NPR
11:45 am
Mon November 26, 2012

2013 NPR Wall Calendar: October

Bill Carman NPR

Originally published on Tue November 20, 2012 12:03 pm

"Turning on NPR in the morning is as important as turning on the lights. Most radio has become noise; it's about who can scream or play the loudest. I hate noise. So now I choose my own music and eavesdrop on people I admire by listening to NPR."

Bill Carman
Listens to KBSX, Boise, ID

Music Interviews
11:44 am
Mon November 26, 2012

The Key To Zen For Tony Bennett: 'Life Is A Gift'

Legendary singer Tony Bennett has won 17 Grammy Awards. He had his first No. 1 hit in 1951 with the song "Because of You."
Marion Curtis AP

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 1:36 pm

At 86, legendary singer Tony Bennett says he's at the top of his game and more passionate than ever about his art.

"I want to try to prove that at 100, I could sing as well as I was singing when I was 45 or 43," he tells NPR's Neal Conan. "I'd like to prove that if you take care of yourself, you can actually not regret the fact that you've become an old-timer, but you can just still improve and actually get better."

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The Salt
11:43 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Why Americans Go Crazy For Pumpkin And Pumpkin-Flavored Stuff

Pumpkins for sale at the Mt. Rogers Pumpkin Patch in the a parking lot in Centreville, Va.
Paul J. Richards Getty

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 3:03 pm

At Thanksgiving, many of us will dig into the pointy tip of our first piece of pumpkin pie for the season. However, this Thursday, that nostalgic moment might feel a little less special.

This year, the word "pumpkin" seems to be creeping its way into hundreds of foods, drinks, and other products. As The Huffington Post noted recently, you can now find pumpkin-inspired beers, teas, marshmallows, soy milk, Pop-Tarts, and Pringles.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:41 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Calculated Instability: The Pioneering Sonatas Of C.P.E. Bach

The special effects in Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's music helped forge a new cutting-edge style.
De Agostini/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 20, 2012 7:56 am

If Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach wrote a dull piece of music, I've not yet heard it. And even if there is a workaday piece or two lurking within his 300 keyboard sonatas, you certainly won't find it on this new album by British pianist Danny Driver, who deftly uncovers the surprising restlessness of the music.

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