State and National News

Muslim men in India will no longer be able to terminate their marriages in a matter of moments, after a split decision by the country's Supreme Court overruled the practice of "triple talaq."

Previously, Muslim men (and only men) could irrevocably end their marriages by repeating "talaq," the Arabic word for "divorce," three times. Women's rights advocates in India have fought to end the practice.

Six years after a fatal crash caused China to throttle back its high-speed rail service, the country is relaunching the world's fastest inter-city lines, including one between Beijing and Shanghai that cuts an hour off the current travel time.

The operating speed of the new bullet trains, known as "Fuxing," or "Rejuvenation," will be 217 mph, according to Chinese media.

It was not until his late 20s that Vincent Doyle discovered that his dead godfather, a priest based central Ireland, was in fact his biological father. And Doyle, a Catholic himself, says that startling discovery inspired in him an abiding mission: to offer support to other children of Roman Catholic priests, who are bound by a vow of celibacy — and to ensure the church supports them, too.

The horror of recent events was a wake-up call for many Americans about the rise of American groups dedicated to the tenets of fascism.

After a number of public comments warning of the dangers of artificial intelligence, Tesla CEO Elon Musk has now spearheaded an effort to ban automated weapons. Musk, along with over 100 tech leaders, penned an open letter Monday to the United Nations asking the international body to consider banning so-called “killer robots,” due to their potential power, speed and vulnerability to hacking.

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In 2015, Kiana Hayeri was living in Kabul and noticed something strange. She was helping her roommate, an Australian TV producer, with a script translation. The main character, a mother of three who divorces her abusive husband, was always described in a way that referred to a male relative.

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