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2:22 am
Tue January 15, 2013

Training Program Aims To Prep Soldiers For Civilian Jobs

Minnesota National Guard Capt. Jeff Pratt, who has nearly 20 years of military service under his belt, found a civilian job with the help of a new jobs program led by the Minnesota National Guard.
Jennifer Simonson for NPR

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 9:11 am

Thousands of Minnesota soldiers deployed in Kuwait woke up to a surprise last spring. Just weeks before the end of their tour, a group of corporate recruiters in business-casual attire showed up on base. The first-of-its kind visit was part of a new strategy to help returning service members find civilian jobs before their feet even hit U.S. soil.

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It's All Politics
5:54 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Poll Says Gun Rights Supporters Fund Their Cause; Opponents Don't

Rifles are displayed at a gun show in Marietta, Ga., on Dec. 22, 2012. A new poll shows overwhelming and bipartisan support for requiring criminal background checks before the sale of firearms at gun shows, as is already required before store sales.
Mike Stewart AP

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 6:20 pm

A Pew Research Center survey on gun laws shows overwhelming support among Americans on a few issues, like closing the so-called gun show loophole; a wide partisan split on more contentious measures, like banning assault weapons; and a glimpse into why the nation's gun lobby may be so successful.

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The Two-Way
5:38 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

U.S. Military's Suicide Rate Surpassed Combat Deaths In 2012

U.S. military suicides rose in 2012. Here, the Army's "Generating Health and Discipline in the Force" report, right, is seen last January. The reports was a follow-up to its "Health Promotion/Risk Reduction/Suicide Prevention" report.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 5:47 am

The number of suicide deaths in the U.S. military surged to a record 349 last year — more than the 295 Americans who died fighting in Afghanistan in 2012. The numbers were first reported by the AP; NPR has confirmed them.

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It's All Politics
4:58 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Obama's Woman Problem Is A Problem Of His Own Making

President Obama holds a news conference Monday in the East Room of the White House.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 1:45 pm

Does President Obama have a problem with women?

On the level of appearances, he certainly does. Which is why at his Monday news conference, he found himself responding to criticisms about the lack of diversity in his picks so far for his second-term Cabinet — State, Treasury, Defense and CIA — who have all been white men.

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Shots - Health News
4:29 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

How Long Does It Take To Shake A Cough?

A health poster from World War II carries a message that still rings true.
National Archives

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 4:15 pm

Antibiotics only work against bacteria, but many people get the drugs to treat viral infections, too.

More than half of people coughing and wheezing from acute bronchitis are treated with antibiotics, even though less than 10 percent of the cases involve bacterial infections.

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Energy
4:21 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Five Years Into Fracking Boom, One Pa. Town At A Turning Point

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 4:40 pm

The natural gas fracking boom has sped up life in Towanda, Pa. There are positives and negatives to that fact — Towanda's unemployment rate stayed low throughout the recession, but its crime rate jumped, too. And now that natural gas prices have slowed down drilling, Towanda is wondering whether its boom is already turning into a bust.

Around the Nation
4:21 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Homeless Seek Shelter, Crops Suffer Amid Southwest Cold Snap

James Truman inspects a grapefruit tree for frost damage on his 21-acre citrus farm northwest of Phoenix.
Peter O'Dowd KJZZ

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 5:33 pm

Cold has descended on an area of the country that is known for its near-perfect weather this time of year.

For several nights in a row, subfreezing temperatures have sent homeless people in Arizona to warming centers, while farmers in Southern California are preparing for a possible crop freeze.

It's Cold Outside

Toni Eskeli tries to keep warm, wrapped in a scarf and a peacoat near downtown Phoenix. She and her boyfriend huddle around a picnic table, rolling cigarettes, doing what they can to stay warm.

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The Salt
4:21 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Women With A Berry-Snacking Habit May Have Healthier Hearts

Regular consumption of blueberries, such as these found at Butler's Orchard in Maryland, may prevent heart attacks in middle-aged women.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 9:08 am

When it comes to supernutritious foods, the blueberry has long had a health halo floating over it.

Going back to Colonial times when Native Americans and English settlers ground up blueberries and added them to porridge, in both dried and fresh forms, there have been hints of health-promoting effects.

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'Radio Diaries'
3:56 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

'Segregation Forever': A Fiery Pledge Forgiven, But Not Forgotten

During his inaugural address on Jan. 14, 1963, newly elected Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace vowed "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever."
Bettmann Corbis

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 7:17 pm

It was just a single line in a speech given 50 years ago today. But that one phrase, "segregation now, segregation tomorrow and segregation forever," is remembered as one of the most vehement rallying cries against racial equality in American history.

The year was 1963. Civil rights activists were fighting for equal access to schools and the voting booth, and the federal government was preparing to intervene in many Southern states.

And on Jan. 14, in Montgomery, Ala., newly elected Gov. George Wallace, a Democrat, stepped up to a podium to deliver his inaugural address.

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NPR Story
3:56 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Obama Warns Of Dangerous Consequences If Debt Limit Isn't Raised

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 4:21 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

We begin this hour with the end of President Obama's first term. He's got less than a week before next Monday's inauguration. This morning, he capped things off with an hour-long news conference in the White House East Room. As NPR's Ari Shapiro reports, most of the focus was on a rash of recent financial crises that Washington itself has created.

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